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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 6, 1959, 12:30 p.m., Governor's Office, State House 

PRESENT ; Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Cashin, Crowley, Fox, Haigis, 
Kiernan, McDermott, McNamara, 
Miss Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, 
Governor Furcolo, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Gillespie, Commissioner of Administra- 
tion Mahoney 

In an informal session of the Board, Governor Furcolo 
explained why he called the special meeting. He described the 
critical financial condition of the Commonwealth and related the 
current fiscal needs as against higher education increased cost 
proposals as contained in the report of the Presidents of public 
higher educational institutions. A rough estimate of the 
educators' proposals would cost $1,250,000 at a time that the state 
is trying to find $90,000,000 in new additional revenue to operate 
existing state programs. 

The Governor said that leading members of the Legislature 
are suggesting a tuition increase of $200, $300 or $500 in order to 
help meet current operational expenses. The Governor asked the 
Trustees to consider the $100 tuition rate established in 1933 in 
terms of the purchasing power of $100 in 1959 with the idea of in- 
creasing it. He felt that the tuition should be adjusted in terms 
of the changing value of the dollar. 

President Mather stated the position of the administra- 
tion on a tuition increase. He explained that Chairman Bartlett, 
who was absent due to illness, was adamantly opposed to a tuition 
increase, and as president he had always been in agreement with the 
policy position taken by Chairman Bartlett. Chairman Bartlett con- 



2053 



Tuition 



2054 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tends that the function of the board of Trustees is to formulate 
policies and make recommendations that will improve the University 
and it is not the function of the Board of Trustees to attempt to 
solve the fiscal problems of the state government. 

President Mather said that he had long supported the ex- 
treme philosophy of no tuition in a public institution of higher 
learning. Nominal tuition rates were established at the University 
when college education was not considered a necessity. He pointed 
out that a college degree today is comparable with a high school 
diploma twenty-five years ago. The President indicated that his 
firm stand against no tuition increase could only be modified by 
some University problem with a higher priority. The most immediate 
problem now confronting the University is an increase in faculty 
salaries - thus he would agree to a tuition increase if the in- 
creased revenue could somehow be related to solving the problem of 
increasing faculty salaries and salary limitations. He pointed out 
that the adverse effect of a tuition increase that will be felt by 
many students should be mitigated by increasing the Commonwealth 
Scholarships and empowering the administration to waive $75,000 in 
tuition charges for an additional 375 needy and able students per 
year. This would be in line with the original recommended amount 
for the Commonwealth Scholarships. President Mather felt that the 
salary program would fail in the Legislature if the administration 
held out for no tuition increase. 

The Board of Trustees then met in formal session after 
signing a waiver of meeting notice. Upon a motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden, Chairman pro 
tern for the meeting. 

After a general discussion of tuition and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To increase the resident undergraduate 
tuition from $100 to $200 per academic 
year (two semesters) and to increase 
resident graduate tuition proportionately, 
effective September 1, 1959. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:50 p.m. 



2055 



Boyden, 
Frank L. 



Tuition 







Secretary 



Chairman 
pro tem 



2056 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 13, 1959, 12:30 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Brown, Cashin, Crowley, 

Fox, Haigis, Kiernan, Hoftyzer, McDermott, 
McNamara, Miss Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Gillespie 

In the absence of the Chairman, President Mather called 

the meeting to order and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden as Chairman 
pro tem of the Board of Trustees. 

President Mather announced that the University of Massa- 
chusetts received two grants from the National Science Foundation 
totaling $105,500 to conduct summer institutes for biology teachers 
and for secondary school mathematics teachers. The University is 
the only land-grant institution that he knows of receiving National 
Science Foundation funds for two summer institutes. The University 
also received a grant from the Atomic Energy Commission in the 
amount of $38,567 for a sub-critical reactor and other equipment to 
be used in teaching nuclear physics and engineering courses. 

The President summarized the financing of research at the 
University. In 1953 all funds designated for research amounted to 
$83,000. In October, 1958 the amount had increased to $1,223,000. 
The tremendous increase in the amount of money being used to finance 
research came about primarily as a result of the professional com- 
petence of the faculty of the University. This indicates but one of 
the many advantages that a university gains by having top -quality 
people on its staff. 

The President explained in detail his proposals for the 
personnel actions as listed on attached Schedule A to these minutes 
and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 



2057 



Boyden, 
Frank L. 



National 

Science 

Foundation 



Atomic 
Energy 
Commission 



Teachers 
Research 



2058 



Personnel 
Actions 



TRUSTEE 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Hampshire 

Inter-Library 

Center 



Four College 

Cooperative 

Agreement 



Faculty & 
Married Student 
Housing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions, merit 

increases, step-rate increases, extra compensa- 
tion and other personnal actions contained in 
Schedule A which is attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 

To fill the place of a Commonwealth Scholarship student 

who withdrew from the University because of poor health and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award Miss Nova Farley, Class of 1960, 
a Commonwealth Scholarship. 

Inasmuch as the University of Massachusetts will derive 
great benefits from having the Hampshire Inter-Library Center lo- 
cated on its campus, and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To continue the University's participation 
with Amherst, Mount Holyoke, and Smith 
Colleges in the fostering and development 
of cooperation among the four institutions 
and the continued cooperative sponsorship 
of the Hampshire Inter-Library Center by 
providing space and facilities in the addi- 
tion to Goodell Library for the book collection, 
offices and reading rooms. 

To implement further the four college cooperative agree- 
ment and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the President to enter into 
a contract with Smith College in the 
amount of $1,621.40 for the teaching 
services of Gwendolen Carter for teaching 
one course during the second semester. 

According to law, the Trustees must authorize terms for 

occupancy in faculty and married student housing. On motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 3 of Chapter 456 of the Acts of 1958 
the terms and conditions of occupancy for 
faculty and the terms and conditions for 
married students as set forth in the forms 
Schedule B and Schedule C which are attached 
to these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes; said terms and conditions 
being in addition to the rental rates pre- 
viously adopted by the Trustees. 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To establish a special rental rate of $35.00 
per month for a one-bedroom apartment in 
Lincoln Apartments for the resident janitor. 

Treasurer Johnson announced an additional gift for the 

Murray D. Lincoln endowment fund of approximately eight acres of 

land adjoining the land near Columbus, Ohio that he gave the 

Trustees a year ago. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
accepting on December 31, 1958 a gift of 
an additional 7.998 acres of land in 
Blendon Township, Franklin County, Ohio, 
adjacent to the land already held by the 
Trustees from Murray D. and Anne H. Lincoln 
and to authorize that this land be placed 
in the Murray D. Lincoln endowment fund at 
$16,795.80 (1957 appraised value of $2100 
per acre). 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize an amendment to the lease with 
Murray D. Lincoln to include the additional 
7.998 acres of land under the same terms and 
conditions as the existing lease. 

The Massachusetts Chicken and Turkey Broiler Test, Inc. 

was organized for poultry tests and research. It was located 

adjacent to the University of Massachusetts so that it could take 

advantage of the professional talent there. All its research and 

tests are now completed and the corporation is in the process of 

liquidation. It has offered its land, building and equipment for 

sale to the University for $14,000. This amount has already been 

appropriated as part of the University's capital outlay program. 

The property and equipment have been appraised by Selwyn Graham who 

set the following valuations: land, $2,300; building, $14,700; and 

tools and miscellaneous equipment, $1,000. Upon motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 



2059 



Lincoln 
Apartments 



Lincoln, 
Murray D. and 
Anne H. 



Land 



Massachusetts 
Chicken and 
Turkey Broiler 
Test, Inc. 



2060 



TRUSTEE 



Lincoln 
Apartments 



National 
Defense 
Education Act 



Lone -term 
Loan Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To buy from the Massachusetts Chicken and 
Turkey Broiler Test, Inc., approximately 
5.81 acres of land with a right of way to 
East Pleasant Street in Amherst and 
situated adjoining the northern boundary 
of the University Tillson Poultry Farm in- 
cluding a 40' x 120 ' one-story, cinder- 
block poultry building equipped with cer- 
tain tools and equipment for $14,000 using 
the appropriation authorizing this purchase 
in Chapter 650 of the Acts of 1958, Item 
No. 8259-58. 

In order that the Lincoln Apartment Building be available 
for occupancy on January 1, 1959, the President, Treasurer and 
Trustee Whitmore inspected the units. As a result of their in- 
spection and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept from the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Association the Lincoln 
Apartment Buildings #1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 
9 and 10 as completed on December 30, 1958, 
subject to the correction of certain condi- 
tions and discrepancies contained in a 
list dated December 30, 1958 in the hands 
of the University Treasurer, a copy of 
which has been forwarded to the Building 
Association architect. 

In order that the University of Massachusetts may 

participate in the loan program provided by the National Defense 

Education Act of 1958, it was recommended that the money in the 

Murray Lincoln Loan Fund be used as the University's matching share. 

Lincoln gave this money to the University as an unrestricted gift. 

The Trustees used the money to set up a student loan fund. Use of 

the money in conjunction with the Federal Grant will enable the 

University to set up a long-term loan program which it does not now 

have. Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

V OTED : On receipt of federal student loan funds 
under the provisions of the National De- 
fense Education Act of 1958 (Public Law 
85-864, 85th Congress) to establish a 
new trust fund to be a long-term loan 
fund for students who qualify for loans 
under the National Defense Education Act 
of 1958 and to transfer so much of the 
principal of the Murray D. Lincoln Student 
Loan Fund in the amount of $5,305.93 to 
this fund as may be necessary for the 
University's matching share as needed on 
a 9-1 basis as required by law. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the following schedule of tuition 
increases, effective September 1, 1959, to 
bring these rates into line with the $100 
per academic year (two semesters) increase 
adopted by the Trustees on January 6, 1959: 

Schedule of Tuition Fees 
Effective September 1, 1959 



Unit 



Residents of 
the Commonwealth 



2061 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Student 
Loan Fund 



Tuition 
Increase 



Undergraduate : 
Four Year 
Special Students 
Special Students 

School of Nursing 

First & Fifth Years 
Second, Third & Fourth 
Years 



Two Semesters 
Per Credit Hour 
Maximum per Semester 



Two Semesters 
Two Semesters plus 
summer program 



$200 

10 

100 



200 
260 



Stockbrid ge Sc hool of Agriculture (non-deg ree) : 
Two Year (full program) Two Semesters 
Two Year (% Semesters) Per % Semester 
Special Short Courses Per Week 



Graduate School 
Graduate School 



Per Credit H Q ur 
Maximum per Semester 



Summe r School (Graduate and Unde rgra duate ) : 

Degree Courses Per Credit Hour 

Degree Courses Maximum per Term 

Special Non-Degree Courses Per Week 



200 
50 
10 

10 
100 



10 

100 

10 



The Henry W. Ranger Fund purchases paintings of promising 
young artists. The paintings in turn are given to institutions tha 
maintain art collections or galleries. The Fund reserves the right 



t 



2062 



Henry W. 
Ranger Fund 



TUITION 
INCREASE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to reclaim paintings within five years of the artist's death. The 
Henry W. Ranger Fund has agreed to give the University of Massachu- 
trustee setts one such painting. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To accept a painting "Harvest Time, 
Extremadura" by Eileen Monaghan 
Whitaker under the terms of the 
Henry W. Ranger Fund. 

President Mather critically discussed recent comments by 
private college presidents and by participants in the Ford Founda- 
tion sponsored seminar on costs of higher education directed by 
Dr. Seymour Harris calling for increased tuition in order to approach 
more nearly the full cost of higher education. He read a letter 
from University of New Hampshire President Eldon L. Johnson to the 
Ford Foundation which pointed out the belief of presidents of land- 
grant institutions that tuition costs should be kept nominal. 

President Mather said the number one need at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts is an increase in faculty salaries. By 
raising the tuition, the Trustees have made available to the legis- 
lature funds that could fulfill this need. On motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt as a policy statement, the state- 
ment entitled Schedule D which is attached 
to these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes concerning an increase in 
tuition. 



The meeting adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



Chairman 
pro tem 



] 



Schedule A 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees 
January 13, 1959, 12:30 noon, Statler Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Personnel Actions 
PROMOTIONS 

DEMINOFF, William, from Instructor of English to University Editor, effective 
February 1, 1959 at $6,006 per year. 

KUCINSKI, Karol J. , from Assistant Professor "A" Agronomy to Associate Pro- 
fessor "A" Agronomy, effective January 15, 1959 at $8,060 per year. 

0'HARE, William G., Jr. from Assistant Director of Bureau of Government Re- 
search to Director of Bureau of Government Research, effective March 1, 1959 
at $7,644 per year. 

SACHS, Allen 0., from Instructor to Instructor "A", effective March 1, 1959 
at $5,538 per year. 

CHANGE OF APPOINTMENT & PROMOTION 

BURKHARDT, William H. , from Instructor to Instructor" A" (Assistant to Dean of 
Men), effective March 1, 1959 at $5,304 per year. 

G0N0N, Mrs. Isabelle L. , from Instructor (% time) to Instructor"A" (full time) 
- Assistant to the Dean of Women - effective January 27, 1959 at $5,070 per year. 

APPOINTMENTS 

ALLEN, Albert, Special Instructor in Agronomy for 6 weeks period beginning 
January 12 and ending February 21, 1959 at rate of $100 per week or total of 
$600. Will teach course in Care and Use of Turf Machinery for Winter Turf School 

CLANCY, Elizabeth B. , Instructor in Physics (1/3 time), effective December 8, 

1958 to August 31, 1959 at $944.08 for the period. M.A. Boston University. 
Mrs. Clancy is filling in on an emergency measure to help out in the Physics 
Laboratory during Dr. Trimmer's illness. 

DAILY, Allan, Instructor in Physics (.^ time) (Teaching Associate), effective 
December 1, 1958 for five weeks at $337.18 for the period. B.A. and Bachelor 
of Engineering, Yale. Presently employed at Kollmorgen Co., Northampton, Mass, 

HOFFMAN, Edward, Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time) (Teaching Associate), 
effective January 28, 1959 at $1,438.66 for second semester only. B.A. 
Amherst College. He is at present working toward his Master of Arts degree. 

HOWE, George R. , Instructor "A" in Dairy and Animal Science (% time) (Research 
Associate), effective February 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of 
Vermont, will complete M.S. from Pennsylvania State University in January of 

1959 and will then work toward his Ph.D. at University of Massachusetts. 

HULL, Anne, Instructor in Romance Languages (% time) (Visiting Instructor), 
effective January 25, 1959 at $2,158 for second semester only. B.A. University 
of Toronto, Certificat de Litterature Contemporaire, University of Paris, which 
is roughly equivalent to M.A. here. This is an emergency appointment to re- 
place, in part, Dr. Meyers tein who has resigned. 

TRASK, Corridon F. , Visiting Lecturer in Education (1/3 time), effective 
January 28, 1959 at $845.00 for second semester only. Ed.D. Boston University. 
He has had several years of experience in public school teaching and ad- 
ministration and he is gaining considerable recognition in his present 
position as Director of Secondary Education in Greenfield. 



I 



Schedule A, page 2 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

DAVIS, Lloyd H. , Associate Director of Extension Service, effective April 1, 
1959 at $10,777 per year (4 steps above minimum) . B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Cornell 
University. Assistant Professor, Agricultural Economics, Cornell University 
1951-53; Associate Professor, Agricultural Economics, Cornell University, 
1953-56; Chief, Fruit and Vegetable Marketing and Utilization Branch, Division 
of Agricultural Economics Programs, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D.C., 1956 to date. 

FENTON, John H. , Professor of Government, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$7,436 per year (2 steps above minimum). A.B. and M.A. University of 
Kentucky; Ph.D. Harvard. Budget Analyst, State of Kentucky, 1949-51; Head of 
Management Services Department, Oak Ridge Institute of nuclear Studies, 1951- 
53; Instructor in Political Science, Tulane University, 1955-57 and is 
currently Assistant Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University. 

HUNTING, Ward M. , Instructor !I A", Food Technology, effective January 25, 1959 
at $5,538 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. and M.S. University of 
Massachusetts. Member of Chemistry Department staff, Eastern Nazarene College, 
1949 to January 1957; Instructor, Food Technology, University of Massachusetts 
under U.S. Army Research Contract and Glass Container Manufacturers Institute 
funds from January 1957 to date. 

WEEKS, Martin E. , Professor "A a , Agronomy, effective January 14, 1959 at 
$9,828 per year (maximum). B,S. South Dakota State College; Ph.D. University 
of Wisconsin. He was successively, Assistant Agronomist, Agronomist, and 
Head of the Department of Agronomy at the University of Kentucky from 1937 to 
1952. Presently Assistant Director, Division of Agricultural Relations, 
Tennessee Valley Authority. 

MERIT INCREASES 

DiMAGGIO, Gellestrina T. , Assistant Professor "A" of Maternal & Child Health, 
effective March 1, 1959 from $5,435 to $6,981 (2 steps). 

DRIVER, Edv;in D e , Assistant Jrofessor of Sociology, effective February 1, 1959 
from $6,240 to $6,474 (1 step). 

GOSS, Albert E. , P-ofes<?or of Psychology, effective February 1, 1959 from 
$8,060 to $8,372. (1 ste;^). 

CHANGE TO FULL-TIME EM? 3 tfYMENT 

FERRIGNO, James M. , Professor of Romance Languages, effective January 26, 1959 
at $8,372 per year. Approved for 3/^ time September 2, 1956. 

CHANGE TO ONE -HALF TIMS EMPLOYMENT 

SETHARES, George, Instructor in Mathematics (Teaching Associate) effective 
March 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. Approved for 1/3 time at July 1, 1958 
meeting. 




1 



Schedule A, page 3 
STEP INCREASE 

FENNER, Heinrich, Instructor "A", Dairy and Animal Science, effective 
February 8, 1959 from $5,538 tp $5,772 (1 step). Dr. Fenner's last step in- 
crease was February 10, 1958. During part of his employment at the Univer- 
sity he has been paid on private grant funds and because of this fact a 
special recommendation for a step increase is required. 

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION 

LILLY, Dennis, Lecturer in Physical Education during illness of Lawrence 
Briggs, to be employed for balance of semester on a part-time basis at $4.00 
per hour for a maximum of 24 hours and to be paid from 03 funds. 

SUMMER INSTITUT E 

_ — | r . m r . m 

WAGNER, Robert W. , Professor of Mathematics, as Director of the Summer Insti- 
tute for High School Mathematics Teachers for the period March 1 through 
August 31, 1959, payment of partial salary of $41.75 per week, to be paid from 
the funds provided by the grant from the National Science Foundation referred 
to as NSF-G6726. Salary as Professor of Mathematics to be reduced to $125.25 
per week (3/4 time) for above period. 

APPOINTMENTS FOR G. E. PITTSFIELD PROGRAM 

# BLOWE, Frank A., Instructor in Physics, second semester of academic year 

1958-59 at $359.66. 

# EDWARDS, Frederick H. , Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 

second semester of academic year 1958-59 at $1,040.00. 

# K0E&LER, G, Stanley, Associate Professor of English, second semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $906.75. 

# LANE, Robert P., Associate Professor of English, second semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $604.50. 

# LEAHY, John, Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic year 

1958-59 at $377.00. 

# LITTLEJOHN, Lyance G. , Jr., Instructor in Physics, second semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $754.00, 

# MARKS, Louis W. , Instructor in Electrical Engineering, second semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $754.00. 

# PHINNEY, Arthur B. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, second semester 

of academic year 1958-59 at $845.00. 

# PRUYNE, Granville S. , Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic 

year 1958-59 at $377.00. 

# ROYS, Carl S. , Professor of Electrical Engineering, second semester of 

academic year 1958-59 at $1,447.33. 

# SINGER, Joseph, Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic year 

1958-59 at $565.50. 

* U of M staff member 

# Previously employed on same program 



I 



I 



Schedule A, page 4 
RESEARCH CONTRACT 

KAWAI, H. , Assistant Professor ,; A" of Chemistry for research under Navy con- 
tract #NONR 2151(00) for the period January 2 to June 30, 1959 (3/4 time) at 
$84,93 per week, 

EMERITUS 

JONES, Linus H, , Assistant Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology, 
Emeritus, effective January 3, 1959. Mr. Jones has been at the University 
since September 1, 1926, 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of January and February, 1959, 



I 



I 



1 



1 



Schedule B 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Faculty Housing 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF OCCUPANCY 

The following Terms and Conditions of Occupancy (hereinafter 
called Terms) are made a part of the registration certificate signed by 
the occupant. 

Part I. - GENERAL 

1. USE OF DWELLING 

a. An occupant shall use this apartment as a home for his family 
only. Occupants shall follow rules and regulations which have been 
made for the safety, comfort, and welfare of all the tenants. 

b. Occupancy of the new garden type apartments is limited to new 
staff members of instructor and assistant professor grades. The maximum 
period of occupancy is three years in these units. These limitations do 
not apply to the University Apartments. 

2. TERMS OF PAYMENT 

a. Rates of Payment . - Rent is payable in advance at the 
Treasurer's Office on or before the first day of each month without 
further notice. Charges for partial periods shall be computed on the 
basis of l/30th of the monthly rate per day for incoming tenants only, 
each month being considered as having thirty days for the purpose of 
this computation. Payroll deduction of rent may be arranged with the 
Housing Office. 

b. No Refunds . 

3 . UTILITIES 

a. Water, hot water and heat will be furnished by the University 
and are included in rent without extra charge. In the garden type 
apartments electricity is also included in the rent. The cost of 
including such utilities in the rent has been based on normal use under 
ordinary conditions. Any abnormal use in excess of usual requirements 
shall be subject to an extra charge. 

b. Any failure to furnish utility services shall not be considered 
to be a violation of this condition. 

k. TERMINATION OF OCCUPANCY 

a. The University reserves the right £o terminate occupancy of any 
tenant upon thirty days' notice, 

b. When the tenant wishes to move from the project he must give 
the University notice of his intent not less than thirty days in advance 
or be subject to rental charge for that period. 



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c. On the date of termination, the tenant must remove himself, 
his family and his property from the project. The dwelling and equip- 
ment shall be left in good order allowing for reasonable wear. If the 
occupant leaves personal property in the dwelling or on the project 
after termination of occupancy by notice or otherwise such property 
shall be disposed of in accordance with local laws on the abandonment 
of personal property. 

5. OCCUPANTS' RESPONSIBILITIES 

a. Aid in Maintenance . - The University and the occupant shall 
cooperate in care of the apartment and grounds. The occupant shall 
notify the University of damage or need for repair of the property. 

b. Alterations by Occupants . - Occupants s hall not make alter- 
ations or repairs to the apartment or its equipment. 

°* Entry . - The occupant shall permit the duly authorized repre- 
sentatives of the University to enter the apartment without notice 
during reasonable hours when necessary in order to provide efficient 
service (repairs, improvements, etc.), or for inspection purposes. 

d. Transfer or Subletting . - Occupants may sublet apartments only 
upon approval in writing by the Supervisor of Housing. They shall not 
give accommodations to roomers, boarders, or lodgers. 

e. Rubbish. Garbage and Waste . - Occupants shall dispose of 
rubbish, garbage, and waste in the proper manner in the interests of 
health, sanitation, and appearance of the project, as determined by the 
University. 

f . Care of Property . - The occupant is responsible for keeping 
University owned equipment and furnishings in good condition and may be 
required to receipt for them. The University reserves the right to levy 
reasonable charges for any damage or for any special services that may 
be required of the University due to the negligence of tenant. 

6. INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

The occupants shall submit to the University upon request, signed 
statements setting forth the pertinent facts concerning the occupant's 
household composition and employment status. The University may 
re-examine such information periodically for the purpose of determining 
whether the occupant has the right to continue to occupy the apartment. 

7. REPRESENTATIVES AND WAIVERS 

Representatives of the University have not made any promises with 
respect to the premises or dwelling other than mentioned herein: The 
failure of the University to enforce any of these terms shall not be 
considered as a waiver of the Terms, but same shall continue in full 
force and effect. 

The University reserves the right to change these rules or to make 
such other rules as are necessary for the safety, care, and cleanliness 
of the premises, and for securing the comfort and convenience of all 
occupants. 



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-3- 

The Treasurer of the University shall be the representative of the 
University to whom occupants shall pay rental, or submit notices as 
required by the Terms. 

8. INJURY, LOSS OR DAMAGE 

The University shall not be liable for any injury, loss, or damage 
to any person or property in the University Housing or on the premises 
on account of the condition of said buildings and premises. 

Part II. - OTHER 

*• Aerials . - Outside radio and television aerials are not permitted. 
Indoor aerials may be installed provided no damage is done to the 
interior of the apartment. 

2. Automobiles . - Occupants using or keeping automobiles within the 
project shall conform to the legal and proper practices applicable to 
public streets, and shall park cars only in such areas as may be 
designated by the University. 

3- Business . - Apartment may not be used as location for a commercial 
business. No signs, placards nor the like shall be displayed. 

**-. Fire Hazard . - Occupants shall take every care to prevent fires, 
particularly with regard to the proper disposal of inflammable rubbish. 
No hazardous inflammable material shall be kept on the premises. 

5» Heating; . - Occupants may not substitute any other facilities for 
heating than those provided. 

6. Electricity . - The circuits provided are adequate only for lighting 
and low consumption appliances. Use of heavy duty cooking appliances 
will result in blowing fuses. The occupant will be liable for charges 
for fuse replacements. 

7. Freezing . - Occupants will be held responsible for damage of frozen 
pipes, as it is deemed to be the tenants responsibility to keep windows 
closed during freezing weather. 

8 « Laundry . - Clothes shall be dried only in designated drying areas. 

9* Pets . - Occupants are not allowed to keep cats, dogs, or other pets 

10. Storage. - No household or other property may be stored on the 
premises outside the dwelling. 

11. Entrances. Stairs and Porches . - Personal property including 
children's toys, carriages, bicycles, etc., shall not be left or stored 
in these areas at any time in a manner that blocks the passage or in 
any way constitutes a hazard or a nuisance. 

12. Janitor Service . - Entrances, stairs, porches, walks and laundry 
room shall be maintained by the janitor as to cleanliness. Cleaning of 
apartments and waxing of floors in apartments is the responsibility of 
the tenant. 

10/8/58 



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* . ■ 



Schedule C 



THE UNIVERSITY OP MASSACHUSETTS 
Married Student Housing 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF OCCUPANCY 

The following Terms and Conditions of Occupancy (hereinafter 
called Terms) are made a part of the Registration Certificate signed by 
the occupant. 

Part I. - GENERAL 

1. USE OF DWELLING 

a. An occupant shall use his dwelling as a home for his family 
only. Occupants shall follow rules and regulations which have been 
made for the safety, comfort, and welfare of all the tenants. Occupants 
shall enjoy the use of this dwelling and join with the University in 
making it a desirable place to liveT 

b» Occupancy P eriod - The rental period for each dwelling unit 
shall be monthly, beginning on the first day of the month. The initial 
period shall be from the day of occupancy to the last day of that month. 
Apartments are rented on a continuing basis only. There will be no 
abatement of the monthly rent?! charge due to non-occupancy during the 
various University recess periods, 

2. TERMS OF PAYMENT 

a. Rates of Payment - Rent is payable in advance at the Treasurer 1 . 
Office on or before the first day of each month. Charges for partial 
periods shall be computed on the basis of l/30th of the monthly rate per 
day, each month being considered as having thirty days for the purpose 
of this computation. 

b. No Refunds 

■""■* ^ w tmmrnm^ -^m^ttm 

3. UTILITIES 

a. Electricity for lighting purposes, water, and heat will be 
furnished by the University and are included in rent without extra 
charge. The cost of including such utilities in the rent has been based 
on normal use under ordinary conditions. Any abnormal use in excess of 
usual requirements shall be subject to an extra charge. 

b. Any failure to furnish utility services shall not be considered 
to be a violation of this condition. 

4. TERMINATION OF OCCUPANCY 

a. An occupant who has completed his course at the University 
shall vacate his apartment by the end of the month in which the comple- 
tion of his course occurs, with the following exceptions: 

(1) If a new term begins within the same month as the 
completion of an occupant's course, he shall vacate Immediately 
to make the apartment available for another occupant at the 
beginning of a new term, unless there are no applicants for the 
apartment . 



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I 



Schedule C 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Married Student H ousing; 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OP OCCUPANCY 

The following Terms and Conditions of Occupancy (hereinafter 
called Terms) are made a part of the Registration Certificate signed by 
the occupant. 

Part I. - GENERAL 

1. USE OF DWELLING 

a. An occupant shall use his dwelling as a home for his family 
only. Occupants shall follow rules and regulations which have been 
made for the safety, comfort, and welfare of all the tenants. Occupants 
shall enjoy the use of this dwelling and join with the University in 
making it a desirable place to liveT 

b. Occupancy Pe riod - The rental period for each dwelling unit 
shall be monthly, beginning on the first day of the month. The initial 
period shall be from the day of occupancy to the last day of that month. 
Apartments are rented on a continuing basis only. There will be no 
abatement of the monthly rental charge due to non-occupancy during the 
various University recess periods. 

2. TERMS OF PAYMENT 

a< Rates of Payment - Rent is payable in advance at the Treasurer'. 
Office on or before the first day of" each month. Charges for partial 
periods shall be computed on the basis of l/30th of the monthly rate per 
day, each month being considered as having thirty days for the purpose 
of this computation. 

b. Np_ Refund s 

3. UTILITIES 

a. Electricity for lighting purposes, water, and heat will be 
furnished by the University and are included in rent without extra 
charge. The cost of including such utilities in the rent has been based 
on normal use under ordinary conditions. Any abnormal use in excess of 
usual requirements shall be subject to an extra charge. 

b. Any failure to furnish utility services shall not be considered 
to be a violation of this condition. 

4. TERMINATION OF OCCUPANCY 

a. An occupant who has completed his course at the University 
shall vacate his apartment by the end of the month in which the comple- 
tion of his course occurs, with the following exceptions: 

(1) If a new term begins within the same month as the 
completion of an occupant's course, he shall vacate Immediately 
to make the apartment" available for another occupant at the 
beginning of a new terra, unless there are no applicants for the 
apartment. 



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-2- 

(2) If at any time on completion of the occupant's course, 
there are no unfilled applications for apartments, the occupant 
may stay on a month to month basis by agreement with the 
University. 

b. Any occupant who withdraws or is dropped from his status as a 
University student shall vacate the apartment at the end of the month. 

c. Any student whose conduct or the conduct of whose family is 
regarded as undesirable to the best interests of the community shall 
vacate his apartment forthwith on written notice from the University. 
Conduct in this sense shall include cleanliness, sanitation, morals, 
or any other phase of conduct which may reflect on the safety, health, 
or welfare of other occupants of the community or of the University. 

d. When an occupant wishes to move from the project he must give 
the University notice of his intent by filling out a "Notice of Intent 
to Vacate" not less than thirty d ays in advanc e. 

e. On date of termination, an occupant must remove himself, his 
family and his property from the project. The dwelling and equipment 
shall be left in good order, allowing for reasonable wear and tear. If 
the occupant leaves personal property in the dwelling or on the project 
after termination of occupancy by notice or otherwise such property 
shall be disposed of in accordance with local laws on the abandonment 
of personal property. 

5. OCCUPANTS' RESPONSIBILITIES 

a » Aid in Maintenance - The University and the occupant shall 
cooperate in care of the dwelling and grounds. The occupant shall 
notify the University of damage or need for repair of the property. 

b. A lterations by Occupants - Occupants shall not make alterations 
or repairs to the dwelling or its equipment. 

c. Entry - The occupant shall permit the duly authorized repre- 
sentatives of the University to enter the dwelling without notice 
during reasonable hours when necessary in order to provide efficient 
service (repairs, improvements, etc.), or for inspection purposes. 

<*• Transfer or Subletting - Occupants may sublet apartments only 
upon approval in writing of the Supervisor of Housing. They shall not 
give accommodations to roomers, boarders, or lodgers. 

e. Hubblsh. Garbage, and Waste - Occupants shall dispose of 
rubbish, garbage, and waste in the proper manner in the interests of 
health, sanitation, and appearance of the project, as determined by the 
University. 

f . Care of Property - The occupant is responsible for keeping 
University owned equipment, and furnishings in good condition and may 
be required to receipt for them* The University reserves the right to 
levy reasonable charges for any damage or for any special services that 
may be required of the University due to the negligence of tenant. 



' 



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-3- 

6. INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

The occupants shall submit to the University upon request, signed 
statements setting forth the pertinent faces concerning the occupant's 
household composition and employment status. The University may 
re-examine such information periodically for the purpose of determining 
whether the occupant has the right to continue to^ occupy the dwelling. 

7. REPRESENTATIVES AND WAIVERS 

Representatives of the University have not made any promises with 
respect to the premises or dwelling other than mentioned herein: The 
failure of the University to enforce any of these Terms shall not be 
considered as a waiver of the Terms, but same shall continue in full 
force and effect. 

The University reserves the right to make such other rules as are 
necessary for the safety, care, and cleanliness of the premises, and 
for securing the comfort and convenience of all occupants. 

The Treasurer of the University shall be the representative of the 
University to whom occunants shall pay rental, or submit notices as 
required by the Terms. 

8. INJURY, LO^S 0^ DAMAGE 

The University shall not be liable for any injury, loss or damage 
to any person or property in the housing buildings or on the premises 
on account of the condition of said buildings and premises. 

Part II. - Other 

1. Aerials. - Outside radio and television aerials are not permitted. 
Indoor aerials may be installed provided no damage is done to the 
interior of the apartment. 

2. Automobiles . - Occupants using or keeping automobiles within the 
project shall conform to the legal and proper practices applicable to 
public streets, and shall park cars only in such areas as may be 
designated by the University* 

3. Business . - Apartment may not be used as location for a commercial 
business. No signs, placards nor the like shall be displayed. 

4. Fire Hazard . - Occupants shall take every care to prevent fires, 
particularly with regard to the proper disposal of inflammable rubbish. 
No hazardous inflammable material shall be kept on the premises. 

5. Heating . - Occupants may not substitute any other facilities for 
heating than those provided. 

6. Electricity . - The circuits provided are adequate only for light- 
ing and low consumption appliances. Use of heavy duty cooking 
appliances will result in blowing fuses. The occupant will be liable 
for charges for fuse replacements. 



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7« Freezing . - Occupants will be held responsible for damage of 
frozen pipes, as it is deemed to be the occupant's responsibility to 
keep windows closed during freezing weather. 

8. Laundry . - Clothes shall be dried only in designated drying areas. 

9- Pets . - Occupants are not allowed to keep cats, dogs, or other 
pets, 

10. Storage. - No household or other property may be stored on the 
premises outside the dwelling. 

11. Entrances. Stai rs an d Porches . - Personal property including 
children's toys, carriages, bicycles, etc., shall not be left or stored 
in these areas at any time in a manner that blocks the passage or in 
any way constitutes a hazard or a nuisance. 

12. Janitor Service . - Entrances, stairs, porches, walks and laundry 
room shall be maintained by the janitor as to cleanliness. Gleaning of 
apartments and waxing of floors in apartments is the responsibility of 
the tenant. 



10/8/58 



"... 
; . . ■ 



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Board of Trustees 
University of Massachusetts Schedule D 

TUITION POLICY 
(adopted, January 13, 1959) 

It is the policy of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
to offer the highest quality education obtainable at the lowest feasible cost to will- 
ing and meritorious students. Thus the two important elements at the University are 
talented teachers and able students. While attempting to maintain these two essential 
factors, the Board must constantly be alert to conditions that might impair either 
the faculty or the student body. 

The most acute problem facing the University is obtaining and retaining 
outstanding professors and professional staff members. If this problem is not 
solved, chronic deterioration will set in and the University will in the long run be 
offering ready-mixed courses and granting counterfeit degrees. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is committed to an increased enrollment 
at the University. This compounds the personnel problem. Not only is competition 
for faculty more intense than ever before in our history so that the University must 
constantly be on guard to protect its staff, with flexible and adequate salary scales, 
from competitive raiding by other institutions, but the University of Massachusetts 
must also recruit additional high caliber faculty members fron a rapidly depleting 
market. 

The University can solve its most compelling problem only through an in- 
crease in salary and salary ranges. 

The duty of the Board of Trustees is to recommend policies that will obtain 
and preserve a first-class educational institution. It is not charged with the 
responsibility of solving the fiscal problem of the Commonwealth. Nevertheless the 
Board when requesting additional revenue to solve its problems cannot ignore the 
financial condition of the state. Thus the Board of Trustees has increased tuition 
at the University of Massachusetts to $200 a scholastic year. It is not coincidental 
that the increased revenue derived from the tuition change could finance/the salary irar 
provements that the Board is requesting. The Board of Trustees is ever mindful of its 
dedication to the public education concept of nominal charges. Only by a low total 
charge can the Commonwealth meet its obligation to provide higher educational opportu- 
nity for the rapidly increasing number of able young people from lower and middle in- 
come families. The former $100 tuition rate was set by the Board of Trustees in 1933. 
Since that time the value of the dollar has depreciated substantially. By doubling tha 
tuition for 1959, no greater relative tuition burden is placed upon the students at 
this time than was placed on them in 1933. Through an increase in tuition, the Uni- 
versity is still able to offer education at nominal rates, and at the same time the 
Legislature has an opportunity to increase salary requirements with no direct burden 
on the taxpayer. 



I 



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I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
February 17, 1959, 1:30 p.m., Hotel Statler Hilton, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 

Cashin, Crowley, Fox, McDermott, 
McNamara, Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Gillespie 

All the provisions of Chapter 629, Acts of 1958, having 

been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, President 

Mather called the meeting to order. Upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden as Chairman 
pro tem of the Board of Trustees. 

Dr. Boyden appointed the following Nominating Committee: 
Trustee Whitmore, chairman, Trustees Crowley and Taber. 

Mr. Austin Broadhurst, representing the University of 
Massachusetts Building Association, was invited to discuss the 
terms of leases executed between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and the University of Massachusetts Building Association for two 
parcels of land and for two dormitories. By the terms of the lease 
agreement, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides heat, light 
and all maintenance for the buildings and will pay insurance pre- 
miums in excess of $1,370. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
assumes an obligation to pay rent for the buildings even if the 
buildings are not completed on schedule or if the buildings are 
damaged. The lease agreement extends one year beyond the maturity 
of the bonds issued to pay for the buildings. The building lease 
is for dormitory #18 to house 164 women and dormitory #19 to house 
442 men. Completion date for dormitory 18 is January 1, 1960 and 
for dormitory 19 November 1, 1959. The term of the lease is 29 



2063 



Boyden, 
Frank L. 

Nominating 
Committee 



206 



TRUSTEE 



Land 
Lease 



Building 
Lease 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

years, 7 months and will expire September 14, 1988. The annual 

rental will be $113,500. The lease on the land continues as long 

as the building lease, and the rent is $1.00. On motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the form of lease from The Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts to University of Massachusetts 
Building Association of two parcels of land for 
the erection of two dormitory buildings, all 
pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as 
amended or supplemented by Acts of 1945, 
Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by 
Acts of 1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, 
Chapter 414, by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by 
Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, 
Chapter 400, by Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, by 
Acts of 1957, Chapter 517 and by Acts of 1958, 
Chapter 456, be and hereby is approved as pre- 
sented to this meeting; and that the Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts, or a 
majority thereof, be and hereby are authorized, 
in the name and on behalf of The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to execute, acknowledge and 
deliver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, said lease of land 
from The Commonwealth to the Association and 
to cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the form of lease of two dormitory 

buildings, by University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts pursuant to Acts of 1939, 
Chapter 388, as amended or supplemented by 
Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, 
Chapter 352, by Acts of 1948, Chapter 185, 
by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by Acts of 
1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, Chapter 
356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, by Acts 
of 1955, Chapter 444, by Acts of 1957, 
Chapter 517, and by Acts of 1958, Chapter 
456, said buildings to be erected by said 
Association on two parcels of land to be 
leased to it by the Commonwealth, be and 
hereby is approved as presented to this 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, or a majority 
thereof, be and hereby are authorized in 
the name and on behalf of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to execute, acknowledge 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and deliver, in or substantially in the form 
presented to this meeting, said lease of two 
dormitory buildings from said Association to 
the Commonwealth and to cause the common seal 
of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 

Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, re- 
ported on actions of his committee taken on February 13, 1959 and 
on the recommendation of the Committee on Finance, it was 

VOTED : To accept the gift of Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait, 
Class of 1885, of 47 shares DuPont stock and 
$118.25 cash making a total of $10,000 to be 
added to the Vincent Goldthwait Student Loan 
Fund. 

It was 

VOTED : To transfer 47 shares common stock of E. I. 
DuPont de Nemours Co. from the Vincent 
Goldthwait Student Loan Fund to the Endowment 
Fund portfolio at 210% using $9,881.75 from 
the Amherst Savings Bank account. 



2065 



It was 



VOTED : 



To purchase 15,000 high grade bonds with re- 
maining $17,601.75 from savings banks and 
uninvested cash as follows: 



10,000 - 
5,000 - 

5,000 - 



AA Commonwealth Edison 4 5/8 - 2009 
(5 yr. non-ref.) @ 102 - yield 4.53. 
AA Southern Natural Gas 4 3/4 - 1979 
(5 yr. non-ref.) @ 103.75 - yield 4.45 

or 
AA Public Service of Indiana 4% - 1989 
yield approximately 4.50. 



It was 



I 



VOTED : To authorize the use of any funds that may be 
received from the Federal Government as match- 
ing funds for Graduate Fellowships under the 
National Defense Education Act of 1958 for 
the furtherance of the Graduate School program 
including the awarding of additional fellow- 
ships. 



Vincent 
Goldthwait 
Student 
Loan Fund 



Endowment 
Fund 



Bonds 



Graduate 
Fellowships 

National De- 
fense Educatioi 
Act 



2 



TRUSTEE 

RSO Funds, 
Athletic 
Trust Fund, 
Student Union 
Reserve Fund 



Research 
Trust Fund 



Dormitories 
18 & 19 



School of 
Education 
Building 



Cold Storage 
Building 



Inf irmary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to place in 
savings banks balances of funds not re- 
quired for current operations from the 
Recognized Student Organizations Funds, 
the Athletic Trust Fund, and the Student 
Union Reserve Fund and to credit the 
respective funds so deposited the in- 
terest earned thereon. 

It was 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to pay the 

publication cost of "Your State Univer- 
sity Reports" from the Research Trust 
Fund Overhead account. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds, reported on actions of his committee taken on 

February 13, 1959 and on the recommendation of the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve final plans of Dormitories 
#18 and #19. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the plans of the School of 

Education and Laboratory Practice School 
subject to the corrections on the plans. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the plans of the Cold Storage 
Building subject to corrections. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the plans of the Infirmary 

subject to the corrections on the final 
plans. 

It was 






TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize dormitories to be constructed 
by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association to house approximately 950 
students (350 women and 600 men) to be com- 
pleted by September 1, 1960. They are to 
be located (1) in back of Dormitory #19, 
(2) north of Wheeler House (3) south of the 
Dining Commons. 

It was 

VOTED ; To adopt the 1960-61 program as listed in 
Attachment A and to consider the 1962, 
1963, 1964 and 1965 projects, as amended, 
as part of the projected five-year program. 

It was 

VOTED ; To direct Treasurer Johnson to explore the 
status of Eastman Lane and North Hadley 
Road in case the Board of Trustees seeks 
to have them abandoned to the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To have Treasurer Johnson explore the 

feasibility of establishing a post office 
on the campus. 

It was 

VOTED ; To accept - 

U-702-Contract #12 - Addition to Steam Distribution 

System, Hartwell Co. January 28, 1959. 
U-602-Addition to Chemistry Building, M.S. Kelliher 

Co. 
U-702-Contract #8 - Coal & Ash Handling Equipment, - 

Wm. T. Donovan Co. January 29, 1959. 
U- 70 2 -Contract #4 - Boiler - Union Iron Works - 

substantially completed. 
U-702-Contract #7 - Addition to Boiler Plant - 

John Capobianco- substantially completed. 
U-805-Vegetable Gardening Building and Greenhouse - 

D. A. Sullivan & Sons. 

President Mather presented his Annual Report for 1958 and 



20G7 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Eastman Lane 
and North 
Hadley Road 



Post Office 






it was 



VOTED ; To accept the report as presented. 

On the recommendation of the faculty of the University 
and of the President, it was 



Contracts 



Annual Report 



TRUSTEE 



Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Grace A. 
Buxton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To confer baccalaureate degrees on persons 
as listed in Attachment B to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes 
effective February 17, 1959. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School and of the President, it was 

VOTED : To confer the appropriate graduate degrees 
upon persons as listed in Attachment C to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes effective February 17, 1959. 

On recommendation of President Mather and upon motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make appointments, promotions and take 
other personnel actions included in the 
list Attachment D attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of President Mather and upon motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award sabbatical leaves as included in 
the list entitled, Attachment E, on these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes. 

The Trustees unanimously 

VOTED : To adopt the following resolution: 

"Be it resolved that the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts express their 
deepest sorrow at the death of their beloved 
friend and colleague, Miss Grace A. Buxton. 

"Since her appointment to the Board in 
February, 1954, she has furthered the cause 
of higher education with wisdom, understand- 
ing and tact. Endowed with innate perspicacity 
and an abundant knowledge born of wide ex- 
perience as a teacher and public servant, she 
performed her duties in a high spirit of responsi- 
bility and dedication. Her great concern for the 
essential values underlying a society's striving 
for the good life was discerningly translated 
into practical counsel and action which earned 
the highest esteem of this Board - and indeed 
of all who knew her. 



' 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"In token of our deepest regard and 
affection for Miss Buxton, we direct that 
this resolution be inscribed in the records 
of the Board and that a copy be sent to her 
family. " 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm all official actions of the 
£ President and of the committees of the 
Board of Trustees for the previous year. 

Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the minutes of the Board of 

Trustees as written in the Official Minute 
Book and signed by the Secretary for the 
meetings of June 1, 1957; June 24, 1957; 
September 30, 1957; November 21, 1957; 
January 16, 1958; February 20, 1958; 
April 21, 1958; May 31, 1958; July 1, 1958; 
September 9, 1958; October 11, 1958; and 
November 20, 1958. 

President Mather described the program of cooperation 

among Smith, Mt. Holyoke and Amherst Colleges and the University 

of Massachusetts. A committee was appointed by the Presidents of 

these institutions to develop a new college program. The committee 

was supported by a grant from the Fund for the Advancement of 

Education. It submitted a report, The New College Plan, on 

November 15, 1958. This report in its printed version has been 

widely distributed and has had very favorable reaction. Copies 

were sent to the members of the Board of Trustees. The committee 

was recently granted additional funds to make further studies. 

On recommendation of President Mather and upon motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the following policy statement: 

"Whereas, the University of Massachusetts has 
found it of great benefit to pursue a policy of 
full cooperation with Amherst, Smith and Mount 
Holyoke Colleges in various programs and enter- 
prises which strengthen its own program, 



2009 



Approval of 
Minutes 



New 
College 



Statement of 
Policy 



2070 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"And whereas, a committee appointed by the 
Presidents of the four cooperating colleges has 
developed a plan for a fifth college and has 
recommended the establishment of such a new 
college in this area, 

"Therefore, The Board of Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts approves a policy 
of encouragement of such a development. This 
policy will entail continued cooperation (a) by 
the President of the University with the Presi- 
dents of Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith in 
sponsoring study and planning committees, (b) 
by the Provost, Deans and Faculty members with 
persons from the other colleges in carrying out 
such studies and planning and, (c) subject to 
the approval of appropriate administrative officers, 
of Faculty committees, and of students, by conduct- 
ing certain experiments designed to test out some 
of the features of The New College Plan. It is 
clearly understood that such cooperation will not 
entail any major financial obligation on the part 
of the University, though it will be of benefit 
to the development of the University's own educa- 
tional program. 

"Moreover, The Board of Trustees agrees that 
if such a New College is in fact established, the 
University will adopt a policy of extending to it 
the same degree of cooperation which it now ex- 
tends to the three neighboring colleges. Such a 
policy will enable such a New College to be a 
part of the Hampshire Inter-Lib rary Center, 
University classes will be open to New College 
students on an exchange or payment basis, Uni- 
versity faculty members with appropriate 
financial arrangements will be allowed to take 
part in teaching programs at the New College, 
and New College will take part in certain exist- 
ing or contemplated programs of cooperation in 
calendar coordination, transportation facilities, 
inter co liege radio and TV programs, and ad- 
ministrative arrangements which lead to greater 
efficiencies." 

The Nominating Committee reported and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one ballot 
for the following slate of officers and 
committee members for the Board of Trustees 
of the University of Massachusetts for the 
year 1959: 



r 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President, Foster Furcolo 
Chairman, Joseph W. Bartlett 
Secretary, John Gillespie 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman Owen B. Kiernan 
Dennis M. Crowley Victoria Schuck 

John W. Haigis, Jr. 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 

Harry D. Brown, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 
Alden C. Brett Charles H. McNamara 

Dennis M. Crowley 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis, Jr. 

Committee on Finance 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 
J. John Fox 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



F. Roland McDermott 
Ralph F. Taber 



Committee on Recognized Student Activities 

Dennis M. Crowley, Chairman Ernest Hoftyzer 
Frank L. Boyden Ralph F. Taber 

Harry D. Brown 



Committee on Legislation 

William M. Cashin, Chairman 

J. John Fox 

John W. Haigis, Jr. 

Executive Committee 

Joseph W. Bartlett, Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden 
Alden C. Brett 



Victoria Schuck 
Ralph F. Taber 



William M. Cashin 
Philip F. Whitmore 



2071 



Committees 



President Mather announced that he has appointed Mr. James 
T. Nicholson as Chairman of the University of Massachusetts 
Centennial Committee. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 




_Secretary 



Chairman 
pro tem 



Centennial 
Committee 



&\) i & 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Attachment A 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1960 

D.B.C. 
Item 
No.* 

85 Science Center, Section 4 $2,500,000 

86 Plans - Men's Physical Education Building 138,000 

87 Utilities Expansion 400,000 

88 Natural Resources Building 1,000,000 

89 Food Technology Building Addition 900,000 

90 Physics Building Addition 2,000,000 

91 Classrooms, Offices - School of Business 1,260,000 

Administration 

92 Poultry Plant and Laboratory Building 250,000 

93 Engineering Building 1,500,000 

97 Plans for Dining Common (new) 75,000 

98 Dining Commons, Addition 500,000 
Plans - Fine Arts Building** 100,000 



Total $10,623,000 



*Recommended by the Division of Building Construction. 

**To be added to the recommendations of the Division 
of Building Construction. 



Feb. 10, 1959 



Revised 

February 10, 1959 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FOR THE FISCAL YEARS 1961-1965 



1961 

1. Men's Physical Education Building $2,500,000 

Including furnishings, equipment, 
and site development 

2. Dining Commons 1,800,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

3. Fine Arts Building ' 2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

4. Additions to Utilities - Steam, Electric, 400,000 

Water and Sewer 

5. Plans - Administration Building 100,000 

6. Plans - Animal Science Building 100,000 

7. Renovate Laboratories ■- Flint Building 40,000 

Including equipment 

8. Physical Education Fields, including 200,000 

drainage, grading, and seeding. 

9. Plans - Assembly Hall & Field House 139,000 



Total - 1961 $7,279,000 



■>.'.;_• i 



."• .! ": '? 



J ••' ; ;..*.' 



,/ • .->;ijc 



I 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -2- 



I 



1962 



1. Administration Building $2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

2. Animal Science Building 2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

3. Assembly Hall & Field House 3,000,000 

Including furnishings, equipment, 
and site development 

4. Additions to Utilities - Steam, Electric 200,000 

Water, and Sewer 

5. Plans for Classroom Building 75,000 

6. Plans for Plant Science Building 83,000 

Including greenhouses 

7. Plans for Engineering Laboratories 100,000 

8. Coal Storage Facilities, including 500,000 

railsiding, equipment, and 
equipment building 

9. Engineering Study of Generating Electricity 10,000 



Total - 1962 $7,968,000 



I 



I 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -3- 



I 



1963 

1. Classroom Building $1,500,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

2. Plant Science Building & Greenhouses 1,650,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

3. Engineering Laboratories 2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 

4. Addition to Utilities - Steam, Electric, 200,000 

Water, and Sewer 

5. Plans for Addition to Library 100,000 

6. Addition to ROTC Federal Funds 

7. Plans for Graduate Science Research Laboratory 150,000 

8. Athletic Facilities and Fields 500,000 

Including site development, grading, 
drainage, paving, seeding, field 
structures and equipment 



Total - 1963 $6,100,000 



I 



I 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -4- 



I 



1964 



1. Addition to Library $2,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



2. Graduate Science Research Laboratory 3,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



3. Addition to Utilities - Steam, Electric 200,000 

Water, and Sewer 



4. Plans for Auditorium 150,000 

5. Plans for Classroom Building 75,000 

6. Plans for Agricultural and Farm Buildings 35,000 



7. Plans for Educational Radio and TV 30,000 

Facilities for instruction and 
research 



Total - 1964 $5,490,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM -5- 



I 



I 



1965 



1. Auditorium $3,000,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



2. Classroom Building 1,500,000 

Including furnishings and equipment 



3. Agricultural and Farm Buildings 1,000,000 

Including equipment 



4. Educational Radio and TV Facilities 750,000 

for instruction and research 

Including furnishings, equipment, 
and radio towers, etc. 



5. Addition to Utilities 200,000 



6. Plans for Addition to Women's Physical Education 30,000 
Building 



7. Plans for Addition to Home Economics Building 50,000 



8. Plans for Cranberry Station Laboratories 20,000 

and Offices (East Wareham) 



Total - 1965 $6,550,000 



GRAND TOTAL - 1961-1965 $33,387,000 



I 



Attachment A B 



DEGREES AWARDED FEBRUARY 1959 
COLLEGE OF ARTS PTffD SCIFNC^S 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Irving Francis Tucker 

Robert Herve Barsalou 
Gioacchino Sebastian Gianino 
Thomas John Hancock 
Gerald Hellerman 



Cum Laude 



Roger Wolcott Weeks Jr 



Rite 



Brinkman Holmes Jr. 
Francis Pensivy 



Norman Saul Winner man 



Philip 
Edward 

Leon Ralph Pomeroy 
Milton Shupe 



Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Rite 



James Howard Bresnick 
Howard Baker Foster 
David Southworth Kitson 
Robert Wells Marquis 
Donald Ralph McComb 



Harley Vilroy McVay 

Joseph Michael Mulvey Jr. 

Joel Falk Sisitsky 

John Allan Tero 

Herbert Fmpsel Willman Jr. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



BACHFLOR OF SCIENCE 



Rite 



Elwin Ralph Boyden 
John Eveleth Derby Jr, 
John William Divoll 
Robert Luigi Gianferante 



Peter Dennett 



Melvin Ephraim Jenkins 
Wayne Spencer Pray 
Harold Sewall Ricker 
Alson Eugene Sherman 
Tripp 



Jr. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
BACHFLCR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Rite 



Edgar Roy Baum Jr. 
Chester Roberts Caldwell 
Robert L. Foley 
Albert Wilfred Gelinas 
William Hooper Goodwin 
Edward Clarence Holt 



Paul Richard Ledoux 
Frederic Leopold 
Thaddeus Julian Magiera 
Donald Beverly Snow 
Robert Bamford Stewart 
Robert Henry Stoddard 



Donald Keyes Whynott 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

BACHFLOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Rite 



James Timothy Daley 
Jeremiah Aloys ius Foley Jr. 
Richard Angelo Guglielmi 



Albert Arthur Pearson 
Edmund John Ryan 
Douglas A.lden Wood 



Jr. 



BACHELOR OP SCIFNCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Cum Lauds 
Roderick Hugh Myers 

Rite 
John Richard Campos Jr. Charles Robin Groome 

Francis Joseph Duguay David Stanley St. Lawrence 

Alan P. Watson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Cum Lauds 
Richard Sanders Taylor Jr. 

Rite 

Elliott Herbert Blackwell .Albert Henry LaFrance 

Gerald Caldwell Drewes Arthur Stanley Piech 

Thomas Roland Kerr Alfred Wong 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
B/CHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 
Paul Francis Costello Philip C. Lawton 

Paul Kollios Edward Ammi down Richardson 



2/17/59 
Attachment B <L 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 
February 19£9 

MASTER OF ARTS 

<——*■*•*— — ■ ■■* WW 

James Louis Rushf ord 
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

■ I - II . n il. 

Emily Madeline Jordan 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 



John L # Blaisdell 
Robert A. Bieber 



Arthur Miller Covell 



William Uarner Metcalfe 
Robert W. Ifurray 
Richard C. Poikonen 



Lincoln A. Jones Catherine Reilly 

Judith G. Lee David Mayo Whalen 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Salvatore George Bruno James Edward Sullivan, Jr # 
Eugene Anthony McPherson Donald Znamierowski 

BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

» .— i ii m il i»n m M.««— ■ ■■i WI I ■■ n — I ■ ■—■■■ ■■ ■■■ I I I ill I I u .Mi I > ** • m n l i 1 1 ' ■ I 

Charles Aglionby Johnson Robert Earry Leaver 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Yueh-hua Chen 



Chemistry 



Remo Franceschini .Food Technology 



Harvey Lifton 



Psychology 



Ira Mints Psychology 
Bernard L # Ryack Psychology 



2/17/59 

Attachment D 

PERSONNEL ACTIONS 
APPOINTMENTS 

S^t^'uX^ur "t'A f feCtiVe FebrU8 ^ 8 > ™ - »,070 per 
1926-23; Massachusetts Division 2 TSSFJZ?*™** Watert0wn Public "brary 
Reference Librarian. sJtb CoUege .^^"c™" 68 ' 1931 - 37 = *»*"«* 

ALCORN, Barbara, Instructor "A" «<:*«„*.< 

B.A. University 'of MicMgan- M A GtrtL r^r^L 18 ^ 1959 at * 5 .°™ Per year. 
had two years of study in paleoaraohv »nrf hJ f 86 < Canbrid 8e University). Has 
followed by three years of experience «? diplomatics at Durham University 
Library. Veteran of the WAVES 1943 46 J 08 " 1 "?, 1 " the Durham diversity 
Reference Assistant at the" Unfvers'icy'of mSSS2l2l8&. * ""'^ 

College. Presently working JZ^^V^X^^ VJ£L~ 

»*2S ^ember^ m** ^"l f IeC ^ l08y ft "->• e "«"ve 
of Massachusetts. Presently enroli.H^n 5° r the period - B - S - University 
Massachusetts, for work towLrf vl I \ " Graduate School, University of 

"itutes of Health R^ch^a*^!^)^ "' Paid '"" Na "° nal *" 

SSctL^eryls wSSTJT 07Vr an (% " me " Ieachin S Associate), 
University. Presently work ng $ ^dVrf """f ° nly ' B ' S " Roos ™* 
Mary Burnham School i„ Northampton? 8rSe an ° h3S been Caching at 

Presently enrolled as $ gLS S^^^/^X^' 

elL'cJve^uarTaT ^V? SS^*? ( * ^ " **"**«« delate), 

of Massachusetts Haa bai J££f2 f°' Se f nd seraeat « only. B.S. University 

Massachusetts. accepted in Graduate School, University of 

Sive^at% A 2 i/? 8 s T!l 7 r 19 in 3 r^ n < 1/3 «"» " TeaC " in8 AsSociata ). 
in Germany and is about to complete Ph £ 32!? "T"* 0nly - * bleur de 8 rae 
Smith College. complete Ph.D. degree. At present an instructor at 

SVirm^To^E tnRe T a " 0n Laada "hip (% time), effective 
University "l. ^wLfnLT?* T*'" ° nly - B " A - Hes '«" State 
Supervisor'of the ltudInt 8 Unio„ Ver8ity - Pre8en " y era P lo * ed as Ni S»t 

SafSAT-2 STffi G d^- I' 1 -'-"university ol K^fe 
in Heliopolis, E*ypt f™ mal? " JanU3ry '^ ° perated a dai ^ pKS 



I 



I 



1 



Attachment D, Page 2 

APPOINTMENTS (continued) 

PROCTOR, J. Worthen, Instructor in Mathematics, effective Jan. 25, 1959, $2,158 
second semester. B.Sc. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is to serve 
as replacement for Professor Cullen who is on sabbatical leave. Director, 
Academic Dept., Ordnance Specialist's School, Raritan Arsenal, New Jersey, 
1930-34; substitute teacher at Amherst High School, 1953-54; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mechanical Engineering at Bucknell University, 1954-58. 

RICKER, Harold S. , Instructor "A" in Agricultural Economics Q$ time), effective 
January 25, 1959 at $2,535 per year. Will complete requirements for B.S. at 
University of Massachusetts in January 1959, and has applied for Graduate School 

SOPHIANOPOULOS , Spyros A., Instructor "A" in Food Technology (% time), 
effective February 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Miami; 
M.S. University of Massachusetts. Presently a candidate for Ph.D. degree in 
Food Technology. 
* See Page 4 

SULLIVAN, James E., Instructor in Accounting, effective January 25, 1959 - 
$1,618.50 for second semester only. M.B.A. University of Massachusetts, 
January, 1959. (3/4 time) 

WHEELER, Robert, Instructor in English, effective January 25, 1959 - $2,158 
for second semester only. B-.A. Dartmouth; M.A. University of Massachusetts. 
He has taught for one year at Leland and Gray Seminary. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOV E MINIM UM 

HOWARD, Robert, Assistant Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,474 per year (maximum). B.A. Ohio Wesleyan University; Ph.D. Princeton 
University. Post-doctoral activities are as follows: Carnegie Post-doctoral 
Fellow, Mount Wilson and Paloraar Observatories, Carnegie Institution of 
Washington, and California Institute of Technology. 

ROWE, Mrs. Barbara C. , Instructor in English, effective January 28, 1959 «*■ 
$2,366 for second semester only (2 steps above minimum). B.A. University of 
Maryland; M.A. State University of Iowa. Instructor in English at University 
of Missouri, 1952-54; Editorial Assistant at Library of Congress in 1955 and 
has served as Editor/Secretary of Technical Planning Associates from 1956-58. 

SUNDERSINGH, John D. K. , Instructor in Economics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). Master's degree in History in 
India; M.A. in Education, Columbia University; M.A. in Economics, University 
of Massachusetts. Head of History and Economics Department at Scott Christian 
College, University of Madras, Nagercoil, India for approximately past 10 years. 
** See Page 4 

WEBB, Gregory W. , Assistant Professor of Geology, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,240 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. Columbia 
University. Instructor, Rutgers University, 1951-52; Geologist, Standard Oil 
Company of California, 1952-56; Instructor to Assistant Professor, Amherst 
College, 1956-59. 

WICKWIRE, Franklin B. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Hanover College; M.A. Indiana 
University. At present working on Ph.D. degree from Yale which he hopes to 
receive in June 1960. 






1 



I 



Attachment D, Page 3 
CHANGE TO ONE-HALF TIME EMPLOYMENT 

FIELD, Mrs. Helen, Instructor in Psychology (Visiting Lecture*), effective 
March 1, 1959 - $1,287 for second semester. Approved for \ time at 
September 9, 1959 meeting. 

CORRECTED APPOINTMENT 

VONDELL, Richard M. , Instructor "A" in Food Technology (% time) , effective 
July 1, 1958 (Frozen Food Contract #12-05-300^27) at $2,652 per year (2nd 
step) instead of $2,535 per year as approved by Board of Trustees in meeting 
of July 1, 1958. B f S. University of Massachusetts; M.S. University of New 
Hampshire; Research Associate, University of New Hampshire for one year 
following M.S. degree. Since September 1957 he has been enrolled in Graduate 
School at University of Massachusetts working toward Ph.D. This change in 
salary is to take care of tuition fee. 

MERIT INCREASES 

HATCH, Benton L. , Associate Professor "A" (Associate Librarian), effective 
August 30, 1959 from $7,748 to $8,372 (2 steps). 

KAVANAUGH, Irene M. , Assistant University Librarian, effective August 30, 1959 
from $6,435 to $6,981 (2 steps). 

LEWIS, Margaret N. , Associate Professor of Physics, effective September 6, 1959 
from $6,981 to $7,254 (1 step). 

ROSEN, Philip, Professor of Physics, effective August 30, 1959 from $8,372 
to $8,684 (1 step). 

REINSTATEMENT 

LEA, Henry A., Instructor in German, effective January 25, 1959 - $1,391 

for second semester only (% time), to complete writing of Ph.D. dissertation. 

SUMMER INSTITUTE 

BARTLETT, Lawrence M. , Associate Professor of Zoology, as Director of Summer 
Institute for High School Biology Teachers for the period March 1 through 
August 31, 1959, at the rate of $36.19 per week, to be paid from funds pro- 
vided by grant from the National Science Foundation referred to as NSF-G6698. 
Salary as Associate Professor of Zoology to be reduced to $108.56 per week 
(3/4 time) for above period. 

EMERITUS 

BANTA, Luther, Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Emeritus, effective 
January 31, 1959. Mr. Banta has been at the University since August 11, 1918. 



1 



Attachment D, Page 4 

STEP- RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable 
during the month of March, 1959. 



APPOINTMENT 



1 



STRITT, Albert R. , Instructor 'A" in Agricultural Engineering (% time), 
effective February 8, 1959 at $2,535 per year, B.S. University of Georgia. 
Employed by Allis Chalmers Co., LaCrosse, Wisconsin, 1957-58. 



APPOINTMENT ABOVE MINIMUM 

** VAN FLEET, Dick S. , Head of Department H A"- Botany, effective July 1, 1959 
at $10,985 per year (maximum). A. B. , M.A. , Ph.D. Indiana University. 
Assistant Professor of Biology, Heidelberg College, 1940-43; Sterling Research 
Fellowship, Osborn Botanical Laboratory, Yale University, 1943-44; Assistant 
Professor of Botany, University of Missouri, 1944-48; Associate Professor of 
Botany, University of Missouri, 1948-53; Professor of Botany, University of 
Missouri, 1953-57; Professor and Chairman, Department of Botany, University of 
Toronto, 1957 to date. 



I 



2/17/59 



I 



Attachment E 

The following Sabbatical Leaves are recommended subject to the usual conditions 
established by the Board of Trustees: 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 
Durat ion : 

Purpose: 



Virginia Davis 

Assistant Professor A" of Home Economics 

Pennsylvania State University 

September 1959 - June I960 (6 months with pay and 4 months 

without pay) 
To do advanced work in Home Economics to improve professional 

qualifications 



Name: 

Title: 

To: 

Duration: 

Purpose: 



Tsuan H. Feng 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

Metcalf and Eddy, Engineers, Boston, Massachusetts 

Fall semester 1959 at full pay 

To do research work with above firm 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



Maxwell H. Goldberg 

Head, Department of English 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Academic year 1959-60 at half pay 

Devoted to shaping book featuring English and allied studies 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Durat ion : 
Purpose: 



George Goodwin 

Associate Professor of Government 

Washington, D. C. 

Second semester of academic year 1959-60 at full pay 

Book- length study 



Name: Karl N. Hendrickson 

Title: Professor of Civil Engineering 

To: Several projects in several states and to Universities of 

Oklahoma, Washington and Illinois 
Duration: Fall semester 1959 at full pay 
Purpose: Investigate possibilities for a curriculum in Engineering 

Geology and to gather material for such curriculum. 



Name: 

Title: 

To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



C. Wendell King 

Professor of Sociology 

University College of British West Indies (Fulbright Research 

Fellow) 
Academic year 1959-60 at half pay 
Research project 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



Henry N. Little 

Professor of Chemistry 

Biochemistry Department, University of California at Berkeley 

Academic year 1959-60 at half pay 

To improve self both as teacher and research worker. 



1 



Attachment E, Page 2 



I 



Name : 
Title: 
To: 

Durat ion : 
Purpose: 



Robert B. Livingston 
Professor of Botany and Acting Head 
Duke University 

Second semester of academic year 1959-60 at full pay 
To increase competence as a teacher and to complete an 
ecological soils research project 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



Harold Rauch 

Associate Professor of Zoology 

Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory , Bar Harbor, Maine 

Academic year 1S59-60 at half pay 

Investigation of the action of a lethal gene in the mouse 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



John L. Roberts 

Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Zoological Institute and Museum, University of Kiel, West Germany 

Academic year 1959-60 at half pay 

Research on the influence of photoperiod on the thermal 

acclimation of metabolism in fishes with reference to 

possible thyroid involvement 



I 



Name: 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



Clarence Shute 

Head, Department of Philosophy 

Hawaii, Japan and India 

Fall semester 1959 at full pay 

To complete research leading to publication in book form of 

an analytical philosophy of religion based on comparative 

studies 



Name : 
Title: 
To: 

Duration: 
Purpose : 



Robert W. Wagner 

Professor of Mathematics 

Possibly at Washington, Oak Ridge or Cambridge 

Second semester of academic year 1959-60 at full pay 

To organize results of research already completed and to 

explore the compatability of these results with the 

potentialities of modern computers 



TRUSTEE 



2073 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
March 17, 1959, 1:30 p.m., Hotel Statler Hilton, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Brown, Crowley, Fox, 
Haigis, McDermott, McNamara, S chuck, 
Whitmore, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Gillespie, Kermit 
Morrissey, representing Governor 
Furcolo 

All the provisions of Chapter 629, Acts of 1958, having 

been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, President 

Mather called the meeting to order. Upon motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Mr. Philip Whitmore as Chairman 
pro tern of the Board of Trustees. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
February 17, 1959 were approved as distributed. 

Trustee Haigis of the Committee on Faculty and Program 
of Study reported the committee actions taken on March 13, 1959. 
He expressed the appreciation of committee members for having had 
an opportunity to dine with the deans and talk with them informally 
about their administrative problems. He called to the attention of 
the Trustees the financial limitations placed upon University ad- 
ministrators in recruiting new personnel. Inability to use state 
funds to pay expenses of persons coming to the campus to be inter- 
viewed results in a financial burden on staff members who must use 
their personal funds or places the Commonwealth in a bad light 
when the person being interviewed must pay all his own expenses. 
This is an extra burden the University has in operating a recruit- 
ment program in a highly competitive market. While there is no 
state law prohibiting the use of state funds to pay travel expenses 



Philip 
Whitmore 



2074 



TRUSTEE 



Four 

College 

Cooperation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



of persons being interviewed for a position at the University, 
nevertheless, vouchers involving travel expenses must certify 
that the person is an employee of the Commonwealth traveling on 
business of the Commonwealth. For employees traveling interstate, 
it is necessary to receive prior approval from the Governor and 



Council. 



The program of four-college cooperation is progressing 



nicely and the possibility of advantages in improved programs is 
great. As an example of four-college cooperation, the Department 
of Astronomy was cited. The small staff of the four institutions 
is now under one head. As a result of this unification, rather 
than four small astronomy departments (one at each institution), 
there is now a single department serving the needs of all four 
participating members. As a result of this cooperation and 
amalgamation, the Astronomy Department of the four colleges will 
be one of the outstanding Astronomy Departments in the United 



States. 



As the University of Massachusetts moves vigorously ahead 



in becoming the public graduate center in Massachusetts, modifica- 
tions in the existing graduate program are recommended. The Uni- 
versity is setting up a graduate faculty which requires special 
qualifications of faculty members. Not all members of the Univer- 
sity faculty will be members of the graduate faculty. The graduate 
program is being shaped to the individual student rather than 
having hard and fast regulations which stipulate number of courses 
to be taken, number of hours in specified fields, etc. The maxi- 
mum length of time in which one must complete his doctoral program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

has been set at nine years. On recommendation of the Committee on 

Faculty and Program of Study and on motion duly made and seconded, 

it was 

VOTED : To approve changes in the requirement for the 
Ph.D. degree included in the list entitled 
Attachment C which is attached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize a Ph.D. degree program in Animal 
Science as described in Attachment D and here- 
by made a part of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve new undergraduate courses, change 
in course numbers, transfer of course, change 
names of departments and deletion of courses 
from the curricula as listed in Attachment E 
to the minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes . 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the organization of the School of 
Business Administration as described in 
Attachment F to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED: To approve the establishment of a two-year 
practical course in Food Distribution in 
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture and 
that the faculty of the College of Agricul- 
ture be charged with the responsibility of 
developing an appropriate curriculum so 
that students may be admitted to the program 
beginning in September 1959. 

Chairman pro tern Whitmore discussed problems inherent 

in the procedure of getting the University budget approved by the 

General Court. He pointed out that all Trustees have an obligation 

to do all that they can in getting the faculty salary increase 

bill and the President's salary increase bill enacted into law. 



2075 



Ph.D. Degree 
Requirements 



Ph.D. Degree 
in Animal 
Science 



Course 
Actions 



School of 
Business 
Adminis t rat ion 



Food 

Distribution 

Course 



2076 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Mather stated that in keeping with the Board 
of Trustees' policy of gearing increased enrollment to financial 
support made available by the General Court the following formula 
will be used: The gross appropriation recommended by the Governor 
(not including revenue appropriated for faculty salary increases) 
less any reduction in revenue by the General Court divided by the 
gross appropriation for students last year will equal the future 
enrollment. It was pointed out that this formula does not take 
into consideration the ravages of inflation which in part will 
affect the quality of education. Thus a ten percent cut in the 
Governor's recommendation based on 6,000 student enrollment would 
result in a cut-back to 5400 students next year. 

President Mather reiterated his opposition to a 20 to 1 
student- faculty ratio. He pointed out that accreditation is based 
on a lower ratio which must be retained if we are to maintain a 
quality program. Only in a limited area may a higher ratio be 
satisfactory. The University is constantly analyzing course loads 
and has substantially reduced the number of small classes taught 
at the University. 

Kermit Morrissey said that the Governor's proposal calls 
for having some national research done on optimum size of college 
classes. He has no preconceived idea on what the ratio should be 
but would like impartial studies developed. 

President Mather discussed the problem of space utiliza- 
tion at the University. Research on the scheduling process is 
nearly complete. It is expected that many changes in the scheduling 
pattern will be made so that utilization of plant will be maximized 



TRUSTEE 



2077 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Use of plant during the summer increases in intensity each year 
with an expanded summer program. 

A higher degree of cooperation among the New England 
state universities in developing specialized areas for individual 
universities to concentrate upon was suggested by Dr. Brett so 
that greater utilization of academic facilities and personnel might 
be accomplished. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions, and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment A which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

After a discussion concerning procedures for awarding 

honorary degrees and upon recommendation of the President, it was 

duly made and seconded to award the appropriate honorary degree to 

persons contained in the list entitled Attachment B which is hereby 

made a part of these minutes but remains on file in the Office of 

the Secretary. 

A discussion by the Treasurer of the financial procedure Student 

Union 
used in operating the Student Union pointed out that the only state Funds 

funds used in operating the Student Union are for heat, light and 
general repair. A transfer of funds accumulated through profit in 
the Food Service Account to the General Fund Account is the proce- 
dure that money is made available for use accruing to the benefit 
of the students. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 



Honorary 
Degrees 



2078 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To transfer $20,000 from the Student 
Union Food Service Account to the 
Student Union General Fund Account. 

The Board agreed to omit the meeting scheduled for 
April 28, 1959. The next meeting will be June 6, 1959 at the 
University of Massachusetts. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





'Jb^-f. 



Secretary 



uJwLk^ 



fi^jL 



Chairman 
pro tern 



I 



Attachment A 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
March 17, 195$ 



APPOINTMENTS 



I 



KEEDY, Daniel, Instructor :, A" in Chemistry, effective March 2, 1959 for three 
months at $97.50 per week. M.S. University of Massachusetts. He will be 
paid from ONR contract (Nonr 2151(00). 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

BUDOFF, Milton, Assistant Professor of Psychology, effective February 16, 1959. 
This is a joint appointment between the University and Belchertown State 
Hospital. Under this arrangement, he will receive $2,773 from the Belchertown 
State Hospital and $4,727 from the University. His salary from 2/16/59 
through 6/30/59 should be $2,127.15 or $111.95 per week. This total amount 
($2,127.15) is to be taken from the Psychology Department's Mental Health 
Training Grant 2M-6244-C3. Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1957. Since 1957 he 
has been on the staff of the Children's Hospital in Boston. 

GRADY, Gerald J., Assistant Director, Bureau of Government Research, effective 
April 1, 1959 at $7,254 per year (5 steps above minimum). B. A. Lawrence 
College; M.A. University of Chicago and is a candidate for Ph.D. Assistant 
Professor of Government at the University of Maine. He has served on the 
Orono Planning Board, was an accredited reporter at the Republican National 
Convention in 1952, and held a Congressional Fellowship in 1956 under the 
auspices of the American Political Science Association, Also has had con- 
siderable experience in practical politics in the State of Maine. 

WHITNEY, Lester F. , Assistant Professor "A" of Agricultural Engineering, 
effective March 29, 1959 at $6,708 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. 
in Agricultural Engineering, University of Maine; M.S. in Agricultural Engi- 
neering, Michigan State University. For the past five years he has been with 
Wirthmore Feeds, Inc., with most recent rank of Assistant Chief Engineer. He 
is presently in charge of the Brattleboro, Vermont manufacturing plant. 

REINSTATEMENT 

WGEHRLIN, William F. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,524 per year. Has been on leave of absence since September 1, 1958. 

CORRECTED APPOINTMENT 

BELTRAN, Ernesto G., Instructor "A" in Food Technology (% time), effective 
February 1, 1959 (Nat. Insts. of Health Res. Grant RG-5848 (RI) at $2,652 per 
year (2nd step) instead of $2,330.25 as approved by Board of Trustees in meet- 
ing of February 17, 1959. B.S. University of Massachusetts. Presently en- 
rolled in Graduate School, University of Massachusetts. This change in salary 
is to take care of tuition fee. 

APPOINTMENT FOR G. E. PITTSFIELD PROGRAM 

ZAJICEK, Oliver T. , Instructor in Chemistry, to complete second semester of 
academic year 1958-59 at $338.60. He will replace Joseph Singer who is 
moving from Pittsfield. 



Attachment A, Page 2 



I 



STEP- RATE INCREASES 



To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable 
during the month of APRIL, 1959. 



I 



I 



ft ~ * * .' ' 



Attccteoafc B 



Chavl.es Pasl Alexander 



Leader of S«tCH©lc$y Seet£on a ©epar&sfisst of EstaKology and 
Plant Pathology 9 - University ©f Masoaehctsetts. 

Boras Septets? 2S S 1889 at Gioversville* Keu -Yorh. 

Degrees s B.S. Corbel 1 University 8 1913. .' 

.D« Cornell University 3 1918. 



Positions; Instructors Cornell University., 1915-17. 

■ Curator 3 Snots Collection (Kansas)., 1917-19. 
earat©r 5 Illinois State natural History Sssrvey., 1919-22. 
Professor of Eatosn^legy (University of Massachusetts) 1922- 
(Xo charge o£ Intossolegy since' 1930 9 Head of Entomology 
. and geology, 1933-48; Bean of .Science, I94§-S2). 

Honors: Pellet? Entomological Society of ^ssriea {President 1942 aed !S43)s 

Fell©*? Entomological Society of Leadsa; Corresponding Msssber 



Bstomologleal Society an$ Soeiedada Baslleira da Sntosologieia; 
Honorary Felloe Sociedad- Chilena d© lato^olpgla; Mesi&er of Sigma Si s 
Phi Kappa Sbi, GfflBB&.Alpb&> A.A.A.S. -and Alpha €es^ss Hho. 

jLtstifieatton: Professor Alexander has served the University of Massachusetts 

■ il urn ■■■! ■! n «t m iifrmnWnir rrm» ** 

creditably as a teacher and administrate? since 1922 3 bat It is 

hi© personal (^nassigned) research^ eoa&sctad saisly outside of 
regular frorkiag ti&B, .tib'ieh has ^ade hiss the mrld'e bast haoua 
living eatogsologist. . Alexander's first. IS publications (the 
first at 'ago IS) siare on birds. Ha then, ttsrnsci to £he erase 
-filed Gn'tahieh 785' papass have sto& eeen pablished, sosse of the® 
literally ©f hook sis®. Bis papers ttamgh 19S0 totaled 
12 8 525 pages 9 an$ inci©«ie$ 7 „922 figures and 7 S 1S7 descriptions 
of sew species. His eras© fly collection n-3® contains as 
estimate*! total of 12«,000 species. He has described sesss 8500 
species of crane flies , ©r ahout o®e cot of every hundred of 
all of the 85© s ©00 insect species sot? knsm to science. (His 
nearest "cas^etiter" in this respect ■ described about 5G0Q > 
species.) fhe quality of hi© scientific %?ork is unchallenged. 
He has inspired ssore competent young saea.t© choose entomology 
as a career than assy other livis^ asaa. "A treaas&dons figure 
of a m£B s " oae of his cessasn express loss tshen spaahisg of 
others 9 is definitely applicable to Charles P. Alexander. 

Professor Ales&nds? Bill retire in 1959. 



Degree Award: Sc.D. 



Koaiaafc&oa gor Boaorary Degree 
L&lliaa Holler G&lbreth 



Position: 



SSoaors ; 



Coastal taat 

May 24, 1878 at: Cakiaad a California 

B. Lite. University ©f California , 1900; M.Litt, 1S02; L.L.D. , 1933, 
Ph.D. , Beobb, 1915; Sc.D. a 1931 

M.- Ingring, Univexe-ity ©£ Hidaigaa, 1928. 

Dr. Engriag- ,, Ratgera College, 1929 ; Stevens Inst. Tech, , 1950; 

Syrae-asa Univ. , 1952. 
Se.D. EaaaeXX Sage College, 1931; Colby College, 1951; 

Lafayette College a 1952. 
L.L.O. Sssith Collie, 1945; Mill© College, 1952. 

Br- Ite;©a Letters, Tss^l® University, 1949; Alfred University, 1948. 
Or. Xadsl. Psyehol, Bsr&e University a 1948. 
Hoaoraiy degrees from? Ml©® Datnier, WaaaiEggtoa University, 
Prisaatoa titaiveraifcy, Skid»re College, 

President of GlX&rata 9 Xse. , eoastrssatioa engineers in laauegemast ; 
Oiraetor eettrs&s i& motia© study and 1© ££aa utilisation of 



Profess©? HaaagHSBBtj Fariiaa University s X 935-4® ; 

Courses' for she dialled, si©sa 1948; 

CnaiE&8& Bapfc* ©f Rsssasssel r©lati®as a lis:eas!& College of 

Engineer issf| a 194X-43; 
Hea* varioias edoe* c«s Ae&rieaa Coazteil. ©ss Edaea£ioa a O.H.X. ; 
Was ESaa^oBa? CoMiasiom; Bffis&er Civilian i^efense Cosaaisaioa of 
Ste Jersey , TEns&ea Ms®telair Library Hoard, 1944; 

&er Esses €m 9 Vocational Board. 



Recipient Hatsry Lm?r@ase Garetfa s&sdal (uitk Frask Gilbreeh) , 
Ba&ie&al last. g@©lal Seia. a teXiaee Clark Xntantatioaal ik<*ard 9 



OB 



1954; gold medal €oaei£e X^anaatioaai d© a 



Organisation Ssie§5tifi«ia® 9 1954. Honorary fell®?? Brit. Xasfc. 
Bag^t; aesBtoes' AsbxIgsii' Assa. U. !te®a; last. &JBP&* &msr. Fayehol. 
Assn., fhi lata Saffa a also several %a„ act. ©rgas; koa. ©sa* 



at. 1 

■out" 



MgiaLgi fcfc Peg- gSaildr®a e 1951 

Manasem©st in She Isma (ttiLgh 0. M. Thesgaa, E. Glysssr) 

aaparas ae&iel&s, took elspts, ©a ©daaatioa,, sssnsgeasst , 



SK 



Mas the- first wc^m to sis the fcfas&iagg&oa teird since the honor 
«as first eosf erred «^ob Herbert Hoover is 1919. Kaos© as the 
"norM's greaseat ^s®sa ©B|gissaer"» 

Wita bar late te^ssd s asveloped teeaaiqaaa ia the field of 
ootioB study asd efe® tapssib of her tsorb in ssaaa&^Beat, tisso aad 
M5»tioa ©tudy sad 1© applyiag easisaeriflis to the fsnaanlties ^Jlch 
has feaaa iater^atiaaally reaogaiaed. Coatribatad probleas o£ 



Degree Award: Sc.D. 



Justification : The Gilbreth &Zozy 9 "Cheaper by the Scsea", gave the entire 
cost. *?erid © seeded "li£t 5 ' 9 &g& sssay have received hope and in- 

spiratioa- throagk fees: philosophy that eigisaerif^ principles 
©as* sffi&e ebc rco*rld a feefcter place in which to live. 
Her reputation is legeiasi aeo^s ssssaea, because ker telfce oa 
"esigiseerissg in the ftoss" hove stimulated aa entire i&gustry, 
asd ts»ch of the credit for Koelera labor-savins devices ia the 
&©^e is directly attributed to her approach to this subject. 
Because of fees' deep s&sderstasidi&g assd ksouiedge;, perhaps 20 
other person devoted mra cnoselS ish interest charis?g ISorld Har 
IX to the vital effort of integrating Americas* ttean into de- 
fense isadtssfcries. ^as already received 19 tasorary degrees 
ia addition to her east F&.D. to Psychology. 

She is a ©n^ser resident of Massachusetts. 



I 



Kcsaination. for Honorary Degree 

Leonard Ber&sfcein 



Position: 



Born: 



>i jimmw 



Pegreea; 



I 



Conductor; Pianist; Composer; Permanent esnsical director of 
the Kes$ York PMl^rssonic Orchestra. 

August 25, 1918 at Irssirence, Massachusetts. 



fcy, 1939. 
Graduate Curtis institute of MasiS;, 1941. 
Studied tfoadueting <&?ith Frits Eeisaes aad S 

Kotsssevitsky. '. 
Studied piss© ulth Eeles Coates, Eelsarich 



erge 



Honors : 



Justification: 



Assist ass to Serge Koussevit sky at Berkshire Ms3s£c Center, 1942. 

Assistant Cossductor W&a York Philharjsoaa&s Symphony, 1943-44. 

Conductor Keu York Cifcy 'Sy&phony, 1945-48; 

^18 ic Adviser Israel Fhilharsionie Orchestras, 1948-49. 

Itosfeer ©f the Faculty Berkshire Music €eat©r, 1948 -, Head 

Conducting Pepartss@nt 8 1951. 
Professor of ISsssie Brs&deis University, 1951-56. 
Has conducted all major orchestras of Halted States and Europe 

in annual Tours, 1954. 
Conductor of Israel Phllhargsonie Orchestra, 6 t£aes 3 1947-56. 
Shared Transcontinental tour ia United States with Serge 

Eoussevitsky s 1951. 

Refer t© seetioa on Jigstigieatioa. 

^orks include: Clarinet Sonata, 1942; Song Cycle , I Hate 
SS&sic, 1943; Piano pieces 8 Seven Anniversaries, 1943; Sys$hony 

So. 1 (Jeremiah), 1942; Five Pieces for Brass Xnstrussents , 1947; 
Sysrohony No. 2 - The Age of Amsiety, 1949. Four Anniversaries 

for Piano, 1943; Song Ciyele, La Bonne Cuisine, 1949; Trouble 
in Tahiti (1 set opera; ©Is® «sote lib&ette), 1952. Score for 
essieai shss? On the Tossa, ballets Fancy 'Free* 1944; Facsimile, 
194§; incidental 6€©i?a for production' Peter Bso, 1950; ssisical 
Seora for Broadway produa&ion, fendsrful To«si 9 1953, Broadway 
musical, Candid©., 1956s file to as Hate^roiat 8 1954; Songs, 
-Mtsrthossgkt, silfpuetfcei '1951; Serenade for violin and string 
orchestra &i&h p©rcussioa s 1954. Off is©; ear© Columbia 
Artists ^aasg€i^st s Inc., 113 W. 57 Straat, B©w York City. 

In addition to his g^mssiissenee in the field o£ the arts, 

Mr. Bernstein is @ satire son and has long bees ©'©saeeted with 



Degree Award: L.H.D. 



Trustee approval to award the degree next year if he is unable to attend 
Commencement. 



Position: 

Bora; 

Etesrees: 

■ i >iiJJiTi l 7 i.i. jri » 



P©sitiei!S! 



Professional 
£££il&s&ieas: 



KomiuatioB for Ksmosrary Degree 

II I !■■ II I M I ■ *!» I ■ I ■ I I »l I W ill llll Illll rf'1 HMf l 

Lewis ^ebsfcor Joises 

■■■ iii h i nMi - « ii HW M i*iWi.» i » J1WH i i m i XW IM) 

Iteesidssst., -Rational Con£e&ence of Christians aad Jous. 

Jwes It. 1899 at fesusoa- Nebraska. 



A.B. 



X&.D. 



Seed College t Portias^ Oi-egoa 9 1922 

Cota&ia University 1924 

Brooki&gs I&stitnte 1$27 

Casa&ridga Bbivssai&y, Lonta 1927-28 

Loadosi School of Economics 192? • 28 

Bjs©<I Sol lege 1946 

Me» York Oaivessity 1952 

Prlaeetoa University 1952 

CJoIt^is Ubitresaity 1954 

Usiversity of Astaisas 1957 
Lafayette 



I».E»D. 



Economist vita Xmtit&t© of Jussrieaa Business, SSsc? York City* 
1924-26; ©coassiist Poraigs Poliey Assoslafcloa, 1926-27; 
economist aad editor 9 1928-30; e©OBomii3t 9 Com* ©& Costs of 
Med. Cafe , 1930-32 5 ©em. faculty Besmissgtoss ©allege., 1932*41; 
acting presidents 1939; presidestj, 1941-47; psesideat ikrk&asas 
li&iversitys, 1947*51; pras» tsstgers Univ.* 1951*53; pses. Nat. 
Gong, of Christian as$ Je^ 9 19* 



STtistee of Brookissgs Isisei&a&loa; psasidaa£ ^asu. Laad Graat 
Alleges assd Ublversifclos, 193S 8 otea. esse* eon.* 1956; coas. , 
spl« csaa. to stody foreign aid progrsse Ubigcd States Senate 9 . ■ • 
19S6»5?. Icoisosaie sdvises 9 Defease C©ais©l©a a 1941. Msm. 
tosrican Eeo&e&ie Assss. » &s» Statis. Assss. s &c*m. Advisory 
Goa&cil of 1st. feissstrial taag. Ed. Sab. race* 3b&. War Labor 
Bd« for B. B. r^gi@a 9 i$43~44; ?s@sidea&'d €o^a. 011 Higher 
Eds. 1946*43; etas. bd. trustees Edal. ?ea&i^ Service 8 1954" 



Hii Beta Eappa, 3bi Eta 8£gGBS, Saieroia 9el&& &§£pa. 



^§£MMSHSE S -^ »-«-« & a -to* GeffiSBcssaafc sweater. 



Degree Award: LL.D. 



Attachment C 



! 



I 



CHANCES IK PH.D. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



A. The following changes in the requirements for the Ph.D. degree 
(page 10 of the 1959-61 Graduate School Catalog): 

1. Unchanged. 

2. The successful completion of graduate courses in the major 
field and in a minor field or fields related to, but not 
part of the major field. The Guidance Committee will de- 
termine the number of graduate credits which the student 
must earn in the major and minor field provided that at 
least 15 credits must be earned in the minor field* 

3. Unchanged. 

4. Unchanged, 

5. Unchanged. 

6. Satisfying the residence requirement. Three years beyond 
the bachelor's degree are required. The equivalent of at 
least one academic year of full -time graduate work must be 
spent at the University of Massachusetts. Wo credit is 
valid after nine years. 

7. Unchanged. 

B. Courses "Open to Graduate Students Only:" 

As credit toward the Master of Education degree only, 
the following Summer Institute courses for high school 
teachers of Biology (these will be supported by a grant 
which the University has received from the National Science 
Foundation for the summer of 1959) : 

*) Biology S. I. 110 , ECOLOGY . - A basic course in ecological 
principles with ecosystem approach. 

Two lectures and two laboratory or field periods per week. 

Credit, 2. 
D. P. Snyder and 



".-: «'H' 



'> • + . i* ■..■• A 



u . * ' * 



II 



1 



I 



- 2 - 

Biology S.I. 112, ADVICES IN PHYSI O LOGY AID GENETICS. - 
Ifwo lectures and one discussion-demonstration period per week. 

Credit, 3. 
P. A. Swenson, A. C, Gentile, J. L. Roberts, and H. Rauch. 

Biology S.I. 113, CLASSIFICATION OF PLANTS . - 
One U-hour period per week. Credit, 1, 

E. L. Davis* 

Biology S.I. 123. CLASSIFICATION OF INVERTEBRATES, 
One li-hour period per week. "" Credit, 1. 

J. R. Traver. 

2) CHEMICAL ENGBIEERHTG 

— Chemical Engineering 222, ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER II. - This course 
is designed for those graduate students who wish to continue the 
study of heat transfer beyond that presently offered in M,E. 221. 
The work load is evenly divided between theory and design* Sub- 
jects covered include natural and forced convection, heating and 
cooling both inside and outside of tubes, condensing vapors, 
boiling liquids and fluidized systems. 
Prerequisite, Hechanical Engineering 82 or 221 or Chemical 
Engineering 198. Credit, 3 

Mr, Cashin 

3) EDUCATION 

Education 110, EVALUATION IN ELBIIENTARY SCHOOLS.- Standardized and 
teacher made tests, rating scales, report cards, growth charts, 
readiness me**ures, and diagnosis of educational deficiency in 
elementary pupils. (To be taken instead of Education l£3 by 
those training for elementary teaching. ) Credit, 2-3. 

The Staff. 

Education 120, CONSTRUCTION OF AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS.- Designed to 
help teachers and audio-visual specialists to prepare audio- 
visual materials for use in an educational program. Students 
will prepare slides, graphics, recordings, still pictures, 
motion pictures. Credit, 2-3. 

Prerequisite, Education 166 # Mr, Wyman, 

Education 121, TEACHING IttTH TELEVISION AND RADIO,- To provide 
the classroom teacher and school administrator with an under- 
standing of radio and television so that they can participate 
in the preparation, utilization, and evaluation of educational 
programs. 

Prerequisite, Education 166 or equivalent, and consent of 
instructor. Credit, 2-3. 

Mr, Wyman, 

Education 130, ELEE1ENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE, - Methods and materials 
of instruction. Credit, 2-3. 

The Staff, 

Education 131, ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES, - Recent findings 
in research in terms of their implications for the elementary 
school social studies program. Credit, 2-3. 

Mr, Rogers. 






I 



I 



I 



- 3 - 

Educat ion 216 } SE MINAR IK. EDUCATION. -Group study of current problems 
Incurriculum, instruction, and administration, involving inten- 
sive study and research in specific phases. Credit, 2-3. 

The Staff, 

Egyoation 231, CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION,-An intensive examin- 
ation of several iuiidamental issues facing our public education. 
Prerequisite, Certification for Teaching, Credit, 2-3, 

Mr. Eddy and Mr, Zeitlin. 

Education 283, THE C0 MPREIM3IVE HIGH SCHOOL.- A critical study of the 
historical development, objectives,"* course offerings, and crucial 
issues confronting the all-purpose high school, grades 10-12. 
Prerequisite, Certification for Teachings Credit, 2-3. 

(In effect, Education 283 will replace Education 183 Mr. Anthony 
which has been dropped. ) 

k) ENGLISH 

English 200, SPECIAL FRCB TiEMS,- For students wishing to do special 
work not covered by courses listed in the curriculum. Permission 
must be secured from the Head of the Department and the instructor 
under whom the study will be done© The latter will supervise and 
evaluate the work* Credit, 2-6. 

The Staff. 

$) GEOLOGY 

Geology 235, APPALACHIAN GEOLOGY .- Geologic history and regional 
tectonics of New England and other Appalachian areas, with emphasis 
on controversial problems. Extensive reading required and student 
discussion expected* Credit, 2. 

Two hours. Mr. HcGill. 

6) HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 121, DEVELOPMENTS IN NUTR ITION EDUCATION. - Interpretation 
of changing and new concepts and of technical materials place of 
nutrition in schools and public health programs. 

Prerequisites, Home Economics 5>2 or 3 credits in physiological sciences. 
Three class hours. Credit, 3» 

Mrs. Cook and Miss Mitchell. 

Ho me Economics 130, H01E MANAGEMENT FOR TODAY'S FAMILIES. - Emphasis on 
management principles involved in family economics, work simplifica- 
tion, and decision making in the home For teachers, extension 
workers, and others who work in an advisery capacity with families. 
Prerequisites, E 4 S degree in Home Economics, Home Economics 175 and 
177 9 or equivalent, and professional experience. Credit, 2-3. 

Miss Merriam and Miss Strattner 
(with Home Management Specialists and 
Research Staff in Family Finance). 



7) POULTRY SCIENCE 

Poultry Science 135 a ADVANCED POU LTR Y HUS BANDRY.- A critical 
review of research in any one of these fields: (a) genetics 
and physiology, (b) nutrition , (c) marketing, or (d) incubation 
and brooding c Three written roports and a coinprehansive final 
examination are required. Designed for teachers of vocational 
agriculture. 

Prerequisites are standard undergraduate courses in 
Poultry Husbandry, Credit, 3, 

The Staff, 

8) SOCIOLOGY 
Sociology 112, SOCI AL CHANGE^- Analysis of change as a process, 
especially the factors making for acceptance or rejection of 
innovations* Planned and unplanned consequences of social 
movement, technological invention and culture contact. 
Prerequisites, Sociology 72 and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. King. 

Sociology 115, THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION ,- The relations of 
religious ideology and ecclesiastical organization to the total 
social institutional system. Special attention to the religions 
of larger civilizations, especially Islam, Buddhism, Medieval 
Christianity, Gentile Paganism, Protestantism, and Judaism* 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor* Credit, 3. 

Mr. Manfred! . 



I 



Socio logy 117, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. -Theories of causation and 

treatment of delinquency. 

Prerequisites, Sociolcgy 78 and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3« 
Mr. Yablonsky. 

Sociolo gy 118, INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY .-A study of the role, status, 
and function of the worker in the industrial community; the im- 
pact of technological change on the community; analysis of 
selected occupational functions. Credit, 3t 

Prerequisites, Sociology 68 or.Economics 79 and Mr, Korson, 
permission of instructor. 

Sociology 229, SOCIOLOGY OP SMAL L GROUPS,- Survey of sociological 
theory and research of small groups. Dynamics of leadership 
patterns, role theories, organization-disorganization theories, 
decision making, interaction process and sociometric structuring. 
The relevance of small group theory and research to concepts of 
the inclusive social system, 
Three class hours. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 82 or equivalent, and per- Credit, 3. 
mission of instructor* Mr. Yablonsky. 



I 



I 



•» 5 •■ 



Sociology 259> SOCIAL STRATIFICATION,- A Consideration of the 
major European and American theorists and their contribution 
in this area* Research techniques in the analysis of social 
class and social mobility are examined* 
Three class hours 3 

Prerequisites, Sociology l£9 or equivalent, and permission 
of instructor* Credit, 3, 

Mr. Levine, 

Sociology 262 » DEMOGRA PHY- An analysis of the demographic trail- • 
sition from peas ant- agricuitu rail sm to urban-industrialism. 
Emphasis is given to the consequences of this transition for 
patterns of settlement and for fertility, mortality, and migration. 
Special studies are made of the demographic characteristics of 
non-industrialized nations as factors in their potential develop- 
ment* Three class hours. 

Prerequisites, Sociology 161 cr equivalent and Credit, 3# 
permission of instructor, Mr, Wilkinson, 

9) ANTHROPOLOGY 

Anthropology 136, INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY, - A cross-cultural con- 
sideration of the relationship between the individual and his 
society with attention to theories, methods and empirical find- 
ings as reported in anthropological literature. 

Prerequisites, Anthropology 163, 166, and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3» 
Mr, Swartz, 

Anthropology 137* THEORY IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, - Theoretical 
problems which have had a lasting place in anthropological 
thought? social structure, cultural dynamics and stability, 
and the transmission of culture as discussed by leading writers. 
Prerequisites, Anthropology 163, l6ii, and permission of instructor. 

Credit, 3» 
Mr, Swartz* 

10) CHEMISTRY 

Chemis try 233, SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY,- One to 
three Copies of current interest will be discussed in detail. 
Recent development of theoretical and/or synthetic importance 
to organic chemistry will be covered* A maximum of six credits 
may be taken. Throe class hours,, 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 181 or permission of instructors. 

Credit, 3-6. 

The Staff, 



-11- 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 



D, J, Hankinson, major adviser 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 
(For either major or minor credit) 



200. 



Special Problems, 
animal science. 



- A specific problem in some aspect of 



Credit, 3-6 
The Staff 



205, Ruminant Nutrition. - An advanced course in ruminant diges- 
tion and metabolism. Special topics will be selected and 
(Note: course discussed in the light of recent and current research, 
write-up 

changed) Prerequisites, Animal Science 151 and Chemistry 179, or 

equivalent. 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Elliot, Mr. Archibald and 

Mr. Fenner 



211. 

(Note: course 
write-up 
changed ) 



215. 

(Note: new 
course to be 
considered by- 
Graduate 
Council ) 



Advanced Animal Genetics. Modern research in animal breeding with 
emphasis on the statistical approach. This includes the devel- 
opment of selection indexes for various farm mammals, sire in- 
dexes, and breeding plans based on systems of mating and selection, 

Prerequisites, Animal Science 166 and Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 177 and 180, or equivalent. 

Credit 3 
Mr. Gaunt 

Mammalian Reproduction, - An advanced course emphasizing the 
comparative approach to problems of reproductive anatomy and 
endocrinology. Lectures, laboratory and seminar reports deal 
with theoretical and practical considerations of current research 
findings in laboratory and domestic animals, and in primates. 



Prerequisites, Zoology 172 and 187. 



Credit, 3 

Mr, Greenstein 



216, 



Fertility and Fecundity. - The role of heredity, nutrition, 
pathology and environment in the determination of fertil- 
ity and fecundity in mammalian forms. Current research 
directed toward control of reproductive function through 
experimental means is emphasized. 

Prerequisites, Animal Science 166 and Zoology 187, or 
Animal Science 215, 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Black 



-12- 



226. 



The Histology of Domestic Animals. - a functional study of the 
tissues and organs of domestic animals with special emphasis 
on those features which have particular economic or physio- 
logical significance in the fields of livestock production, 
meats, nutrition, milk secretion and animal breeding. 

Prerequisites, Zoology 150, and Veterinary Science 175 or 
equivalent. 

Credit, 3 

Mr, Green3tein 



229, 230, Seminar, - Reports on current literature. 



Credit, 1 each 
semester (Max, 
credit, 4 

The Staff 



300. 
4-00. 



Thesis, Master's Degree 
Thesis, Ph.D. Degree 



Credit, 5-10 
Credit, 30 



COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS FOR WHICH MAJOR CREDIT MAY BE GIVEN 



Agricultural Economics 177, Elementary Experimental Statistics, Credit, 3 

Mr. Russell 



Agricultural Economics 180, Advanced Statistical Method, 



Agronomy 264., Experimental Methods in Agronomy, 



Bacteriology 185, Immunology, 



Bacteriology 202. Advanced Bacterial Physiology, 



Bacteriology 205. Advanced Immunology. 



Chemistry 185. Radio chemistry. 



Chemistry 234. Advanced Biochemical Lectures, 



Chemistry 235, Advanced Biochemical Methods, 



Chemistry 236, Advanced Biochemical Analysis. 



Credit, 3 
Mr, Russell 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Yegian 

Credit, 3 
Miss Garvey 

Credit, 3-5 
Mr. Mandel 

Credit, 3-6 
Miss Garvey 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Richason 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Little 

Credit, 3-5 
Mr, Little 

Credit, 3-5 
Mr, Little 



-13- 



Chemistry 237. Biocolloids, 

Chemistry 239. Chemistry of Natural Products. 



Credit, 3 
Mr, Bennett 

Credit, 2 
Mr. Little and Mr, McVJhorter 



Home Economics 203. Advanced Nutrition-Metabolism of the 

Major Foodstuffs. 



Credit, 3 
Miss Mitchell 



Home Economics 204.. Advanced Nutrition-Vitamins and Minerals Credit, 3 

Miss Mitchell 



Home Economis 205. Laboratory Methods and Techniques in 

Nutrition. 

Poultry Science 205. Avian Genetics. 



Poultry Science 206, Advanced Poultry Genetics, 



Poultry Science 207. Advanced Poultry Nutrition, 



Poultry Science 208, Advanced Poultry Physiology, 



Zoology 150, Histology of Vertebrates. 



Zoology 172. Vertebrate Embryology, 



Credit, 3 
Mrs. Uertz 

Credit, 3 

Mr, Smyth 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Fox 

Credit, 3 

Mr, Anderson 

Credit, 3 
Mr, iiellen 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Rollason 

Credit, 4 



Mr, Woodwise, Mr, Rauch and Mr. Bartlett 
Zoology 178. Genetics of Animal Populations, 



Zoology 183. Geaeral and Cellular Physiology, 



Zoology 184., Comparative Physiology. 



Zoology 187, Endocrinology. 



Zoology 220, Experimental Embryology, 



Zoology 245, Advanced Vertebrate Physiology, 



Zoology 24.8, Physiological Genetics, 



Credit, 2 
Mr, Rauch 

Credit, 4 
Mr, Sv/anson 

Credit, 4- 
Mr, Roberts 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Snedecor 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Uoodside 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Snedecor 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Rauch 



-U- 

COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AMD UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

165. Reproduction in Farm Animals, - Comparative aspects of anatomy, 

embryology, endocrinology and physiology of the reproductive 
systems of farm mammals , concepts of fertility and sterility , 
and practice in semen collection, artificial insemination and 
pregnancy diagnosis. 

Credit, 3 
Mr, Black 

166. Applied Animal Geaetics, - The workings of heredity and variation in 

farm mammals, and the role of selection procedures and breeding 
systems in genetic improvement of livestock. 

Prerequisite, Zoology 153, Credit, 3 

Mr, Gaunt 

* 175, Milk Secretion, - The physiology of milk secretion in relation to 

the endocrine glands which control it and to more practical aspects 
of dairy production. The development of the mammary gland from 
birth through parturition and lactation is studied grossly and 
microscopically. 

Credit, 2 
Mr, Foley 

* New course to be proposed to Course of Study Committees, 

COURSES FOR MINOR CREDIT ONLY 
(No graduate credit for students majoring in animal Science) 

151, Fundamentals of Animal Nutrition, Credit, 3 

Mr. Elliot 

152. Feeds and Feeding, Credit, 2 

Mr, Elliot 

154, Meat Processing. Credit, 3 

Mr, Buck 

* 156. Beef, Sheep and Swine Production. Credit, 4- 

Mr. Baker 

* 178, Dairy Cattle Production. Credit, U 

Mr, Foley 

* Change in course content and/or credit to be proposed to Course of 
Study Committees, 



-15- 



OTHER CATALOGUE CHANGES 



Add: Animal Science to the courses Available as major subjects for the 
degree Doctor of Philosophy in the section titled "General In- 
formation" and found on page 12 of the 1957-59 Graduate School 
catalogue. 



Attachment E 

New Undergraduate Courses, Change In Course Numbers, 
Transfer Of Course, Change Names Of Departments And 
Deletion Of Courses From The Curricula 

Proposed New Undergraduate Courses 

Art 42 - Oil Painting: A continuation of Art 41. The revised description 

of 41 and 42 reads; An introduction to easel painting in oil and related 
media, based on an elementary understanding of the physical properties of 

the medium and encouraging individual direction within the limitations of 
sound pictorial composition. 

6 studio hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Art 41 

Art 44 - Water Color: A continuation of Art 43. The revised description 
of the two courses reads: A basic approach to water color painting on 
paper, with initial concentration on transparent water color, emphasizing 
control of techniques and mastery of color relationships. Further ex- 
perience with opaque watercolor, such as gouache and casein, is encouraged. 
6 studio hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Art 43 

Business Law 73 : This course will cover Partnerships, Corporations, the 
law of credit and credit instruments. It will also include the fields of 
Real Property and Mortgages. 

Prerequisite: Business Law 71 3 credits 

(Formerly 70) 

Economics 82 - Economic Development: Economic problems of underdeveloped 

countries and the policies necessary to induce growth. Individual projects 
will be required. 
Prerequisite: Economics 25 3 credits 

Food Management 81 (I) Hotel Practice - Elements of Hotel Management. 
Food Management 81 will be offered in place of Food Management 67 (Food 
Preparation and Service, Quantity Foods). Food Management majors will 
obtain quantity food training by taking Home Economics 92, Quantity Food 
Preparation. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory 3 credits 

Food Management 82 (II) Laws of Innkeeping (Institution Law). Law as applied 
to hotels and food service establishments; includes a consideration of bail- 
ments,, torts, regulations, insurance, and sanitation. 
Prerequisite: Business Law 70 3 credits 

3 class hours 

Mechanical Engineering 89 - Instrumentation. The study of mechanical in- 
strumentation with particular emphasis on mechanical -electrical transducers. 
A few pertinent heat power experiments vill be included. For E. E. majors 
only or permission of instructor. 

1 class hour; 1 3-hour laboratory 2 credits 

JTe requisite: M. E. 66 



2. 

P sychology 87 - Industrial Psychology II. The application of human factors 
data to the analysis, evaluation, design and use of man-machine systems and 
equipment. Emphasis is on analysis of human abilities and limitations of 
speed, accuracy, perception and decision processes. 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Psychology 26 

Psychology 89 - Psychology of Occupations. A developmental study of in- 
dividual interests, attitudes and abilities as related to occupational se- 
lection and proficiency. Included will be consideration of the psychometric 
and psychological survey techniques fundamental to occupational research. 
3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Psychology 26 and 81 

University Studies ; Honors 51 - Junior Honors Symposium, The presentation 

and discussion of topics emphasizing inter-relationships of the various 

disciplines and selected topics in specialized subject matters. 

Meets once a month No academic credit 

For Junior Honors Stud ants 

Instructors: Visiting lecturers 

(To be offered Fall, 1960) 

Change in Number and Transfer of Course to Another College 

From Zoology 85, Anthropods Other Than Insects to: Entomology 83, 
Anthropods Other Than Insects, and transfer this course from the Depart- 
ment of Zoology, College of Arts and Sciences, to the Department of 
Entomology and Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture. 

Change in Name of Department 

From Department of Sociology to Department of Sociology and Anthropology. 
From Department of Geology and Mineralogy to Department of Geology. 

Deletion of Courses from University Curricula 

Food Management 67. Food Preparation and Service, Quantity Foods. 

Physical Education 63 & 64 - Teaching Sports for Secondary Schools 

Physical Education 65 - Play Activities and Games for Elementary Schools 

Physical Education 66 - Rhythms and Dancing for the Elementary School 

Physical Education 68 - Water Safety Instructor Course 

(The above courses in Physical Education (for women) have 
been replaced by other courses in the new curriculum in 
Physical Education for women previously approved by the 
Board of Trustees.) 

Animal Husbandry 74. Advanced Meats 

Forestry 62. The Management of Small Woodlands 

Food Technology 85. Marine Products Technology 

Food Technology 86. Marine Products Technology 

Food Technology 96. Introductory Research Methods 

Fisheries Technology - option listed under Food Technology 



I 



Attachment F 



Proposal for Departmentalization 
School of Business Administration 



1. Departments : 

ACCOUNTING 

GENERAL BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

MANAGEMENT 

MARKETING 

2. For each Department there shall be designated a Chairman (the term 
"Head of Department" shall not be used). The appointment shall not 
be restricted to the rank of a full professor but may have any rank 
at the discretion of the Dean as approved by the Provost and the 
President. 

3. Each Chairman shall serve for a term of five years, with reappoint- 
ment possible, upon recommendation of a committee and the Dean. 

4. It shall be understood that no Chairman shall attain tenure status 
as a Chairman but only as a member of the faculty. 

5. Upon official approval of Departments as indicated in #1 the first 
Chairmen shall be appointed for a term of two years. Thereafter 
Chairmen shall be appointed for a term of five years under conditions 
indicated in #3. 

This is the second year that we have been organized under four "AREAS", 
substantially like the ones mentioned in #1. I have selected Chairmen 
on an annual basis. I think the time has come to recognize officially 
what we are now doing so that we might announce the establishment of 
Departments and the appointment of Chairmen. 



H. B. Kirshen, Dean 

School of Business Administration 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

May 19, 1959, 1:30 p.m., Hotel Statler Hilton, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, Cashin, 
Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Healey, Hoftyzer, 
Kiernan, McDermott, McNamara, Miss 
Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Gillespie, Mr. Lichterman representing 
Governor Furcolo 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 

having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, 

President Mather called the meeting to order. Upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden as Chairman 
pro tern of the Board of Trustees. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
March 17, 1959 were approved as distributed. 

Trustee Crowley of the Committee on Recognized Student 

Activities reported the Committee's action taken on April 24, 1959. 

Upon the Committee's recommendation and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To ask the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association to include as part of the 
building equipment of new buildings to be 
constructed vending equipment consisting of 
washing machines and driers. 

President Mather discussed some problems involving the ad- 
ministration of the Athletic Trust Fund. The major sources of 
Athletic Trust Fund revenue are as follows: 

1. Student fees established by the University 
Board of Trustees. 

2. Gate receipts and guarantees. 

3. Vending and concession receipts. 



2079 



Frank L. 
Boyden 



Vending 
Machines 



Athletic 

Trust 

Fund 



2080 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Athletic Council budget operations differ from most 
other organized University programs in that the operating funds are 
trustee not available as of July 1 from appropriation allocations; thus 

balancing expenditures with cash receipts in the early part of the 
fiscal year presents problems. Since revenues from gate receipts, 
guarantees, vending and concession operations have been transferred 
to the Barber Fund for scholarship and grant-in-aid commitments, 
additional difficulties are encountered which have to be met by 
"borrowing" from the Barber Fund to meet operating expenses until 
other receipts are available for that purpose. This is a difficult 
and cumbersome procedure and it is requested that scholarship and 
grant-in-aid payments be permitted to become a part of a non- 
earmarked athletic operated budget and that no effort be made to 
try to separate sources of income. 

Upon recommendation of the Committee on Recognized 

Student Activities and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : Effective July 1, 1959 all receipts on 
account of the athletic program and 
activities are to be deposited in the 
Athletic Trust Fund and that all dis- 
bursements from this fund shall be in 
accordance with approved budgets of 
the University Athletic Council unless 
otherwise voted by the Board of Trustees. 

And it was 

VOTED ; It shall be the general policy of the 
University not to use student tax re- 
ceipts or fees for scholarships to 
other students except as approved by 
the President on an interim or emergency 
basis. 

The growing complexity of the athletic program at the 

University was discussed and the Committee on Recognized Student 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Activities recommended the creation of a Board of Trustees' 

committee on athletics. Inasmuch as this shall require an amend- 

trustee ment to the By-Laws, such amendment will be considered at the next 

meeting. 

Trustee Whitmore of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 

reported the Committee action taken on May 15, 1959. Upon the 

recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the buildings now under construction 

on the University campus be named as follows: 

ROTC Building - Walter M. Dickinson Armory 

Dickinson, a member of an old Amherst family 
and brother of a Trustee of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, was a student in the Class of 
1877. Although most of his family were graduates 
of Amherst College, he was attracted to this in- 
stitution because it offered military courses. 
After some years as an officer in the West in the 
wars with the Indian tribes, he returned in 1892 
to command the military detachment. One of the 
twenty-eight MAC men to enlist in the War with 
Spain, he was ordered to Cuba as quartermaster 
of the 17th Regiment. He was fatally wounded at 
El Caney on 1 July 1898, the first alumnus of 
the College to be killed in a foreign war. 

Men's Dormitory - Henry Francis Hills House 

Mr. Hills was born in Amherst in 1833 and 
was for years active in civic affairs and in the 
development of the region. A leading spirit in 
the effort to bring the College to Amherst, he 
served on the committee to create the campus and 
was active in raising the subvention proffered 
by the Town. He was a Trustee of the College 
from 1865-1878 and with his father, contributed 
$10,000 in 1867 for the upkeep of the Botanical 
Gardens . 



2081 



Walter M. 
Dickinson 
Armory 



Henry Francis 
Hills House 



2082 



TRUSTEE 



Mary Lyon 
House 



Minnie R. 
Dwight House 



Anna Johnson 
House 



Cold Storage 
Building 



Infirmary 



Science 
Center 



College of 
Agriculture 
land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Women's Dormitory #16 - Mary Lyon House 

Born in Buckland, Massachusetts, in 1797, 
Miss Lyon attended The Amherst Academy. Im- 
pelled by her desire to improve educational 
opportunities for women, she founded both 
Wheaton and Mt. Holyoke Colleges. From the 
latter the foundation of five other colleges 
for women has directly stemmed. Although 
Miss Lyon was never directly connected with 
the University, her unparalleled services to 
the collegiate education of women prompted 
the Board to suggest her name as appropriate 
for a dormitory for women. 

Women's Dormitory #17 - Minnie R. Dwight House 

Minnie R. (Mrs. William G.) Dwight was an 
active member of the University Advisory Council 
of Women (1923-57) . She was the first woman to 
receive an honorary degree from the University 
of Massachusetts (LL.D. 1947). 

Women's Dormitory #18 - Anna Johnson House 

Anna (Mrs. Clifton) Johnson, of Hadley, 
was appointed by President Butterfield as a 
charter member of the Advisory Council of 
Women on which she served from 1921 to 1944. 
She was active in youth work. Throughout her 
active career she strongly supported the work 
of the University. 

On recommendation by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 

and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifica- 
tions of the Cold Storage Building. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the Infirmary. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the Third Section of the S c ience Center. 

Trustee Whitmore discussed the plan now being considered 

for the purchase of approximately 600 acres of land for the College 

of Agriculture. This land is not adjacent to the campus but is in 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the vicinity. Money has already been appropriated for this purpose 

and a full recommendation for action will be brought before the 

Board of Trustees at a later meeting. 

President Mather pointed out how inadequate is the number 

of Commonwealth scholarships. This year there were 738 legitimate 

applicants for our 25 Commonwealth Scholarships. The 25 students 

nominated by the faculty Committee on Financial Aid and Scholarship 

showed average scores on the College Board examinations of about 

640. The family background average of the 25 families of which the 

students are members showed the number of dependent children 3.1, 

the net income before taxes $5,300, and the face value of the family 

life insurance $4,600. On recommendation of the President and upon 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships to persons 
included in the list entitled Attachment A 
which is attached to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly made 



and seconded, it was 



X 



VOTED ; To make the appointments, promotions and other 
personnel actions included in the list entitled 
Attachment B which is attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 

President Mather pointed out that it is usual procedure 

for the Board of Trustees to permit the use of interest from Trust 

Funds for scholarship and grant-in-aid. Upon his recommendation and 

on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the use of Trust Fund interest 
of $6,500 for scholarships and $4,500 for 
grant-in-aid. 



2083 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Personnel 
Actions 



Trust Fund 
Interest 



2084 



TRUSTEE 



Foreign 
Students 
Tuition Waiver 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In 1949 the Board of Trustees authorized five waivers of 
tuition scholarships for foreign students. In 1956 the number was 
increased to ten. Since that time the increasing number of appli- 
cants for tuition scholarships have increased substantially. Presi- 
dent Mather stated that the increasing number of qualified appli- 
cants are coming from those areas in the world in which the United 
States is seeking to increase technical skills. Upon his recommenda 
tion and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize an increase in the number of 

foreign student waiver of tuition scholarships 
to 15. 

Because of indispensable assistance given to University 
of Massachusetts practice teachers by public school teachers 
throughout the Commonwealth, the Board of Trustees authorized a 
waiver of tuition for public school teachers who supervise in the 
classroom training of our practice teaching students. With the de- 
velopment of the School of Nursing, students enrolled in the School 
of Nursing also do on-the-job training under the supervision of 
graduate nurses in the Springfield Hospital, Wesson Maternity 
Hospital, Springfield Health Department and the Springfield Visiting 
Nurse Association. The President recommended that the Trustees 
authorize a tuition waiver for graduate nurses in cooperating 
agencies utilized in the clinical portion of the nursing program by 
the School of Nursing in much" the same way as school teachers are 
granted a tuition waiver for cooperation with the School of Educa- 
tion. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize a tuition waiver for graduate 
nurses in cooperating agencies utilized in 
the clinical portion of the nursing program 
by the School of Nursing as described in 
Attachment C attached to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

The Class of 1959 voted to give a gift to the University of 

Massachusetts of $2500 so that the chimes in the Old Chapel could be 

electrified. Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept a gift of $2500 from the Class of 
1959 for the electrification of the chimes 
in Old Chapel that were given by Bernard H. 
Smith, Class of 1899 in memory of Warren 
Elmer Hinds of the Class of 1899. 

Upon recommendation of the President and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve changes in the graduate curriculum 
as contained in the list entitled Attachment 
D attached to these minutes and hereby made a 
part of these minutes. 

Each year the Board of Trustees recommends to the Trustees 

of the Lotta Crabtree Estate candidates for the Lotta Crabtree 

fellowships. This year the Graduate Council of the University 

recommends Mr. Theodore Tzianabos and Edward R. Balboni. Upon motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees of the Lotta M. 
Crabtree Estate Theodore Tzianabos and Edward 
R. Balboni for the $2,000 Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowships in the Graduate School 

Due to legal complications in settling the liquidation of 

West Superior, Inc. (a corporation stock of which was given as a 

gift to the University by Murray D. Lincoln in 1957) Treasurer 

Johnson requested authorization to execute Internal Revenue Service 

Form 2045. It is expected that by executing this form, litigation 



2085 



Tuition Waiver 



Graduate Nurses 



Chimes 



Graduate 
Curriculum 



Lotta Crabtree 
Fellowships 



Internal 
Revenue 
Service 
Form 2045 



2086 



TRUSTEE 



Cooperative 
Policy - 
State and 
County Exten- 
sion Workers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



concerning the liquidation of West Superior, Inc. will be settled 

sooner. Upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to execute Internal Revenue Service Form 2045 
modified to read as follows: 

In consideration of the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue not issuing a statutory notice of deficiency to 
and making an assessment against the above-named trans- 
feror corporation, the undersigned admits that it is 
the transferee of assets received from said transferor 
corporation, and has paid $1,863.14 to the Internal 
Revenue Service, August 6, 1958, check #119052, as pay- 
ment in full of all Federal income, excess -prof its, or 
profits taxes finally determined or adjudged as due and 
payable by the above-named transferor corporation for 
the taxable year (or years) ended February 25, 1957, 
to the extent of its liability at law or in equity, 
as a transferee within the meaning of Section 6901 of 
the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 and corresponding pro- 
visions of prior internal revenue laws: 

FURTHER: The undersigned agrees, in the absence 
of prior written consent of the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue, not to sell, transfer, or assign without ade- 
quate consideration all or any substantial portion of 
its assets ; and 

FURTHER: The undersigned has, by resolution 
of its board of directors, been authorized to enter 
into this agreement and there is attached a copy of 
the minutes of its board of directors evidencing the 
authorization and that the terms of this agreement 
have been included in its corporate minutes. 

Trustee Brown of the Committee on Agriculture and 
Horticulture reported the committee's actions taken on April 9, 
1959. Trustee Brown and President Mather discussed the Cooperative 
Extension Appointments and Membership in the United States Civil 
Service Retirement System as it pertains to persons with the Exten- 
sion Service - both State and County. Due to changes in Federal 
regulations, the President requested a new policy statement be 
adopted. Upon his recommendation and on motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
VOTED : To adopt the following policy: 

a. To continue to recommend to the Federal 
Extension Administrator approval of per- 
sonnel actions affecting members of the 
present state and county Extension staffs 
who are now holding appointments as Agent 
Without Compensation in the United States 
Department of Agriculture unless such staff 
members request in writing to the Director 
of Extension that their appointments be 
terminated. 

b. That in all other instances affecting present 
and future state and county Extension workers 
there be no recommendations made by the State 
Extension Director to the Federal Extension 
Administrator for appointment as Agent With- 
out Compensation in the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture until such time as 
acceptance of Federal personnel benefits are 
no longer conditions of eligibility for such 
appointment. 

The problem of purchasing land for the farm operation of 

the College of Agriculture was discussed and upon recommendation of 

the committee and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the College of Agriculture continue to 
seek feasible off- campus areas to which the 
farm operation might move. 

President Mather discussed the absence of a workable 

policy pertaining to a division of rewards from inventions, patents 

and discoveries made by University personnel with University 

facilities and on University time. On recommendation of the 

committee and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the administration continue its study 
of the problem of outside employment, and 
patents and inventions by University per- 
sonnel with the idea of preparing a policy 
statement for consideration by the Board 
of Trustees. 

President Mather pointed out that the title "College of 

Agriculture" does not adequately describe the type of work, the 

programs, or the organizational relationship of the College of 



2087 



College of 
Agriculture - 
land 



Policy Statement 
Covering Patents 
& Discoveries 



2088 



TRUSTEE 



Institute of 
Food & Agri- 
cultural 
Sciences 



Water & Soil 

Research 

Laboratory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Agriculture to the University. He supported the recommendation of 
the Committee on Agriculture that the name of the College of Agri- 
culture be changed to "Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. 1 
After a discussion pertaining to the connotation of the term 
"Institute" and on the recommendation of President Mather and motion 
being duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To table the recommendation to the Board 
of Trustees that they change the name of 
the College of Agriculture to the Institute 
of Food and Agricultural Sciences. 

President Mather announced that the United States 
Secretary of Agriculture is making a water and soil resources study 
pertaining to the establishment of water and soil research labora- 
tories. Three research laboratories have already been established 
in the United States. Report of a Department of Agriculture 
committee has recommended that two be established in New England - 
one at Amherst, Massachusetts. Such a center is completely under- 
written by the Federal Government. It would be a two million 
dollar project and would increase the professional staff on the 
campus by 20. Operations and capital outlay would be completely 
financed by Federal Funds. The President announced that he and the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture were in Washington to contact 
congressional delegations concerning the location of one of the 
laboratories. Congressman Boland was directed by the group to work 
with the Department of Agriculture in attempting to get the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts designated as the location of one of the 
laboratories. 

President Mather reminded the members of the Board of 
Trustees that an honorary degree had been voted to Christian A. 
Herter but the date of awarding the degree had not been set so that 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
the Board of Trustees could avoid being placed in a position of 
setting a precedent which would require it to give every Governor 
an honorary degree. Now that Mr. Herter is Secretary of State and 
by virtue of his high position in the Federal Government, the 
President recommended that the Board of Trustees permit the con- 
ferring of the honorary degree. Because of the busy schedule of 
Mr. Herter, the President further recommended that if Mr. Herter is 
unable to come to the campus that the degree be conferred on 
Mr. Herter at his Washington office. On motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confer an honorary degree upon Christian 
A. Herter at a time and place convenient to 
the recipient. 

On recommendation of the Treasurer and on motion duly 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To sell 200 Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. 
rights . 

Trustee Crowley announced that the faculty of the Univer- 
sity were publishing a new literary magazine - The Massachusetts 
Review . At his suggestion, the Trustees gave the project its whole 
hearted endorsement. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:05 p.m. 



2089 




Secretary 



Honorary 
Degree - 

Christian A. 
Herter 



2090 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ATTACHMENT fl 



CUSS 963 ~ "WO UPS 



x.r.''vu!./l—. fl.^.-V-'W-'.^^ 



! 



ti^ih 



1. 0*Blenes, Carole 0. 



2. Comman, Beverly L. 



3* Burnes, Sharon L« 

omartlnoj Janet M,- 
5 Goodnow* Joan E„ 
6« Uroaskl, Moaetta B. 

7,., "Whitney, Marilyn A* 



S<; Ganfieldjj Karen 



9* Ifisio, Carolyn 
10 * Eobicheau, Betsy SB, 



I 



I 



11- Grotto., Idnda J, 
Lawton^ Susan L. 

13* Levine, Huth 3* 

14* Peterson, Bethel kim 

15. Jacques, Carol A* 

16-, Taber, Marlon M* 

17., '3CeJLlinen« Virginia A« 

18. aaithj Carol Ac 

19,- Specter, Shirley A* 

20* Conlon, Bemice A« 

21 o L&nghert, Carol B* 

22* Cherry, Judith A* 

53* larl, Marilae L* 

2-4 » gembiskl, Louise 14* 



l^LliMJ 


CO! 




an 


Essex 


Mathematics 


Mattapan 


Suffc 


Chemistry 


Dalton 


Berkshire 


Chemistry 


Valtham 


Middle seas 


Chemistry 


fiolbrook 


Norfolk 


Mathematics 


Holyoke 


Hampden 


Shgineering 


Leicester 


Worcester 


Education 


Pittefield 


Berkshire 


Biology 


Bradford 


Essex 


f 're-Medical 


Wellfleet 


Barnstable 


English 


ALTERNATES 






Greenfield 


Franklin 


Languages 


Springfield 


Harapden 


.Liberal Arts 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


Modern Languages 


Cambridge 


Middlesex 


Chemistry 


Beverly 


Essex 


Modern Languages 


Hevton Centre 


Middlesex 


Undecided 


Aahburnham 


Worcester 


Science 


Chesterfield 


Hampshire 


Undecided 


Cambridge 


Middlesex 


Mathematics 


Springfield 


Hampden 


English 


Dorchester 


Suffolk 


Edu cation 


Vakefield 


Middlesex 


Education 


Lunenburg 


Worcester 


English 


Hat 


Hampshire 


Mathematics 



Page 



GLASS OF 1963 - WOMEN - RECOM M ENDED FOR COMMONWEAL TH SCHO LARSHIP S 

. -1 - — -i-i ■ 1 1 1 r - -1 ----,-., r nr ■ 1 1 r f -■ ■ 1 't *-- - — r- - ■■ -- , -, - -■-.-■ , r ■ , ■■-.,. ■ ■ -■■ .... ^.. — ■ . ...>. ,-... — ■■ 



NAM: 



( 25« Roach, Elizabeth A. 

26. Pierce, Suzanne E. 

27. DeRiso, Teresa M. 

28. Ramos , Jacqueline L* 
29 • Fletcher, Margaret E. 
30 o Miller, Betty P. 

31 o Goddard, Sandra J* 

32 Colt, Carolyn A* 

33 o Reilly, Jo-Ann 

34,o Russell, Wendy 

35 a Primmer, Elisabeth L. 

36* Crosier, Elizabeth A* 

37. Mitchell, Elizabeth A, 

38. Wilson, Joan K. 

39. Viera, Barbara L. 



HOME TOWN 

Boxborough 

Oxford 

Springfield 

New Bedford 

Fall River 

South Braintree 

Gilbertville 

North Easton 

Florence 

Reading 

Williamstovn 

Dalton 

West Roxbury 



COUNTY 



MAJOR 



Everett 



West port 



Middlesex 


Liberal Arts 


Worcester 


English 


Hampden 


French 


Bristol 


Bacteriology 


Bristol 


English 


Norfolk 


Undecided 


Worcester 


Liberal Arts 


Bristol 


Undecided 


Hampshire 


Undecided 


Middlesex 


History 


Berkshire 


Mathematics 


Berkshire 


Physical Education 


Suffolk 


Education 


Middlesex 


Undecided 


Bristol 


Physical Education 



CLASS OF 1963 ~ MEN - RECOMMENDED FOP. COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



NAME 

1. Clark, Artnur £. 

1.2 • Desrosiers, Robert L. 

3* Minihan, Cornelius J. 

4.« Houde, Edward D« 

5«. Desautel, Richard D» 
Benedetti* Donald Wo 
Lahtinen, George P* 

8o Higginbotham, Frank S« 

9 c Withers, Mark R c 
10o Dybikowski, James C* 

11 . Starr, Martin S* 

12 . Casv»li, Jerry V* 

j.3» Smola, Edward H., Jr. 
L4. Provost, Thoma3 J. 
15« Shea, John A., Jr. 



H OME TOVN 

West Bridge water 

Pittsfield 

Bu: "irds Bay 

Attleboro 

Plainville 

North Adams 

Fitchburg 

Attleboro 

East Lee 

South Hadley Falls 

Dorchester 

Marblehead 

Three Rivers 

Feeding Hills 

Ware 



COUNTY 

Plymouth 

Berkshire 

Barnstable 

Bristol 

Norfolk 

Berkshire 

Worcester 

Bristol 

Berkshire 

Hampshire 

Suffolk 



Hampden 
Hampden 
Hampshire 



MAJOR 

Chemistry 

Engineering 

Pre-Medical 

Education 

Mechanical Engineering 

Science 

Chemical Engineering 

Mathematics 

Engineering 

Undecided 

Chemistry 

Biology 

Arts & Science 

Mathematics 

Undecided 



ALTERNATES 



16. Cormier, Rene E. 

17 • Pellegrini , John B» 

18 „ Ryan, Peter Co 
19c Kasper, George P« 
20„ Doyle, Thomas Mo 
21o Therrien, Richard H< 
22 o Fedoryshyn, Peter 
23c Wallace, James F« 
2U a Barss, Peter 

25* Wheeler, David B. 



Leominster 
Leominster 



Southb ridge 



Greenfield 

Pittsfield 

Laiirence 

Pittsfield 

Watertorai 

Bolton 

Reve:-. 



Worcester 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Franklin 

Berkshire 

Essex 

Berkshire 

Middlesex 

Worcester 

Suffolk 



Pre-Medical 

History 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Engineering 

Engineering 

Undecided 

Undecided 

Physics 

Engineering 



Page ~2 



CLASS OF hi SCHOLARSHIPS 



'OWN 



COUNTY 



UK 



I Creane, John M. 

John, Philip M. 

Woodis, Raymond A« 

3uddy, Francis H a 
>0 U Borovskiy Paul 

Doyle, John A* 

Chalmers, Paul 
| LeCuyer^ Edward J« 
J4.c Garber, Stanley J* 
|35* Clancy, David L« 

Menael, Robert C. 
(37. Mongeau, Abbott A. 
Bj*. Rich, Samuel W. 

•i. Weiner, David S. 
|40. Sobek, Robert S« 
|41° Moore, Albert B» 
|42. Lincoln, Peter B. 
43* Rice, Edward A., 
44* Panaro, Michael D* 
45* Mann, Edward K» 
1 46 , Beck, Fred L* 
47 a Larson, Roger C« 
480 Bellevue, Francis H«, Jr* 
49 t Aliegrezsa, Anthony E., Jr. 
50 • Casey, Lawrence J. 



/.yoke 


Hampden 


Liberal Arts 


Quincy 


Norfolk . 


Undecided 


North Brookfield 


Worcester 


English 


Worcester 


Worcester 


Chemistry 


Easthampton 


Hampshire 


Electrical Engineering 


Pittsfield 


Berkshire 


Engineering 


Medford 


Middlesex 


Liberal Arts 


Springfield 


Hampden 


Business Admin,, 


Lynn 


Essex 


Liberal Arts 


Quincy 


Norfolk 


Undecided 


Springfield 


Hsmpden 


Chemical Engineering 


Farnumsville 


Worcester 


Undecided 


Mattapan 


Suffolk 


Engineering 


Roxbury 


Suffolk 


Education 


Lynn 


Essex 


Botany 


Kingston 


Plymouth 


Engineering 


Ware 


Hampshire 


English 


Brighton 


Suffolk 


Pre-Dental 


Woilaston 


Norfolk 


Liberal Arts 


West Roxbury 


Suffolk 


Engineering 


Woilaston 


Norfolk 


Chemical Engineering 


Stoughton 


Norfolk 


Mechanical Engineering 


Everett 


Middlesex 


Chemistry 


Milford 


Worcester 


Undecided 


South on 


Su.ffo.lk 


Mechanical Engineering 



I 



I 



Page - 3 



CLASS OF 1963 - MEM - RECOMMENDED FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 

■ ii - i i i ■■!> i ■mi --1T1 nniiii i i iit i»i i t - - --■... - . |f . . . i- Itm - M , [irm i, r -| Br i M[ , M ^ M | < ^ r 

HOME TOWN COUNTY MAJOR 



151. Burns, Brian A. 

52. Cobb, William R. 

53. Kelson, James E. 

54-* Levine, L. James 

55 o Daly, Stephen P« 

56o Rogers, Gilbert S« 

57* Binney, David G« 



Lynn 


Lis sex 


Engineering 


Holden 


Worcester 


Biology 


Roslindale 


Suffolk 


Engineering 


Mewton 


Middlesex 


Civil Engineering 


Springfield 


Hampden 


Undecided 


Lawrence 


Essex 


Civil Engineering 


Wrentham 


Norfolk 


Engineering 



II 



SUGGESTED ALTERNAT ES FOR COMM ONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS 

MEN 



il 



-ir. 



lo Kemp, Paul Lo 

2„ Roffman, Bert on 

3- Sprague, Richard W. 



1. Babeau, Robert E. 

2. Costantini, Michael 
3o Groteau, Donald A. 



lo Kinsman, Arthur A* 
2* Moschos, Bemitrios 
Rogers, Alan C« 



1 Bailey , Jacqueline 

2 a Der Sarkisian, Ao Diane 

3= Holmes, P. Jane 



1. Binkley, Patricia A. 
. Boyce 5 Elaine J. 
. Fedoryshyn, Dorothy 



CLASS OF I960 
HOME TOWN COUNTY 



Greenfield 
Dorchester 
Boston 



Springfield 



Worcester 



Ashbumham 



WOMEN 



CLASS.QF._lg60 



Kingston 
Whitman 
Pigeon Cove 



Franklin 

Suffolk 

Suffolk 



CLASS OF 1961 
Fit chburg Viorce st er 
East Longmeadow Hampden 



Hampden 



CLASS OF 1962 

Tin mm iri-T — — ■ f mrirniinr- t -it 

Weymouth Norfolk 



Worcester 



Worcester 



Plymouth 
Plymouth 
Essex 



CLASS OF 1961 

Vest Springfield Hampden 

Springfield Hampden 

Pitt sfi eld Berkshire 



MAJOR 
Sociology 
Zoology 
History 



Chemistry 

Electrical Engineering 



Industrial Engineering 



Mathematics 



Business Admin. 



Engineering 



Sociology 

Bacteriology 

Botany 



Zoology 

i^athematics 
Nursing 



II 



M 



US 



iGESTED ALTJSFi- FOR COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARS 

WOMEN 

era ., - pMfM 

CUSS OF 1962 
HOME TOW COUNTY 



I.,. Kussey, Rosemary 
2* Xelley, Judith 
3. Hevhall, Martha £• 



Worcester 
Greenwood 



Cambridge 



Worcester 



Middlesex 



Middlesex 



MAJOR 



Liberal Arts 



Education 



History 



i 



L. T 



C OMMONWEALTH REPLACMECTS FOR 1959-60 
(Recommended to University Board of Trustees) 



CLASS O F, 196 1 



NAME 

Susan A. Lazarus (l) 
Susan D* Gallagher (2) 



CO UNTY 

PljTflQUth 

Worcester 



CUMUI.ATIVE 

AVEFAGE 






(l) Replacing Leona A. Archambault 
(<} Replacing, iit.ncy C. Johnson 



3.5 
3.4 

3.4 

2.2 



CLASS QF1^2 



Boris E. Kollls (3) 
Patricia A* Conway (4) 

(3) Replacing Toby R. Gross 
(4.) Replacing Helen 3, Goldberg 



MAJOR 



Philosophy 



Elementary Education 



Leaving for personal reasons 

Transferring to Tufts to 
study occupational, therapy 



Norfolk 


3®4 


Sociology 


Middlesex 


3oS 


Home Economics 


is 


3.9 


Getting married 


.do erg 


3*4 


Transferring to Boston 
University 



May 6, 1959o 



Attachment 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
'day 19, 1959 



APPOINTMENTS 



BEER, Lawrence, Instructor in Geology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. Bates 
College, 1958. Presently enrolled at University of Massachusetts working 
toward Hester's degree. He is doing very satisfactory work as a Teaching 
Associate (1/4 time) during the second semester of this academic year. 

BROCK, Roy J., Instructor in Sociology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. North 
Carolina College in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate 
School of the University of Massachusetts. 

CAPELESS, James, Instructor in Sociology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. University 
of Massachusetts in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate School 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

CHANDIRAMANI, Nebhan Karam Chand, Instructor "A" in Veterinary Science, 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $5,070. Bachelor of Veterinary 
Science and Animal Husbandry, U. P. College, Mathura, India, 1952. He has 
worked with the Indian Government both in the field and in the laboratory in 
cattle and poultry diseases. 

DEITZ, Paula, Instructor in Sociology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. Smith College 
in June, 1959. She has been accepted in the Graduate School of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

DICKEY, Wayne B. , Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. McMurry 
College, Texas in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate School 
of the University of Massachusetts. 

EMERSON, Lloyd S. , Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. American 
International College in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate 
School of the University of Massachusetts. 

FRYE, Charles I., Instructor in Geology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,508. B.S. University of 
New Hampshire. Presently doing very satisfactory work as a Teaching Associate 
during the first and second semesters of this academic year. 

MENTO, Robert K. , Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. Williams 
College in 1957. He has been accepted in the Graduate School of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 



I 



Attachment D, Page 2 
APPOINTMENTS (continued) 

PESTRONG, Raymond, Instructor in Geology (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. New York City 
College, 1959. He came to this University at the beginning of the second 
semester and is working toward his Master's degree. 

SHAPIRO, Bernard H. , Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. University 
of Vermont, 1951; M.A. University of Massachusetts, 1955. He will be working 
toward a Master of Arts degree in Mathematics this coming year. 

SHEA, Daniel F. , Jr., Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. American 
International College in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate 
School of the University of Massachusetts. 

SMITH, Earl A., Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.S. Northeastern 
University in June, 1959. He has been accepted in the Graduate School of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

TAYLOR, Patricia J., Instructor "A", Veterinary Science, effective July 5, 
1959 at annual salary of $5,070. Will receive B.S. from Cornell in June, 1959. 
Experience: Summer 1956, Merry field Animal Hospital, Hamden, Connecticut; 
Summer 1957-58, Veterans 1 Administration Hospital, West Haven, Connecticut. 

WRIGHT, George E., Instructor "A" (Cataloguer for Library), effective July 1, 
1959 at annual salary of $5,070. B.A. University of Massachusetts, 1949; M.S. 
in L.S. from Syracuse University School of Library Science, 1956 and has had 
three years of experience in library work as Assistant Branch Librarian and 
Cataloger in Syracuse University Library. 

YACUBIAN, Arthur E, , Instructor in Mathematics (1/3 time - Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at annual salary of $1,438.66. B.A. Eastern 
Nazarene College, 1959. He will be working toward a Master's degree this 
coming year. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MI NIMUM 

ARCHER, Robert R. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
1959 at $6,474 per year (maximum). B.A. and Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology in 1952 and 1956. One-half time teacher in Mathematics, M.I.T. , 
1952-55; Instructor, Applied Mechanics Division, M. l.T. , 1955-56; Assistant 
Professor of Applied Mechanics and Mathematics, Air Force Contract, M. I.T. , 
1956 to present. Fulbright Lecturer in Germany, 1957-58. 

BEMBEN, Stanley M. , Instructor in Civil Engineering, effective September 1, 
1959 at $4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. in Civil Engineering, 
University of Massachusetts 1956, M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of 
Illinois 1957. Instructor of Civil Engineering, University of Massachusetts, 
1957*58. He is now working toward his Ph.D. at University of Illinois. 



Attachment 0, Page 3 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

HEADLEY, John M. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1959 at $4,940 
per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Princeton University 1951; M.A. Yale 
University 1952 and is nearing completion of his dissertation for the Ph.D. 
degree at Yale. He has had one year of teaching experience at Oakwood School, 
Poughkeepsie, New York. 

HICKS, John C. , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,564 
per year (maximum). B.A. Middlebury College 1941; M.A. Boston University 1951 
and expects to receive Ph.D. from Boston University in June, 1959. His teach- 
ing experience is as follows: U.S. Naval Training School 1945; Tufts College, 
1947-50; Wesleyan University, 1952-57. 

HULTIN, Herbert 0. , Assistant Professor "A" Food Technology, effective 
July 19, 1959 at $6,435 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. and M.S. 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1956; will receive Ph.D. in June 1959 
from M. I.T. He has had industrial experience through summer employment as 
follows: Pneumatic Scale Corp., Ltd., Junior Engineer; Central Laboratories, 
General Foods Corp., Junior Technologist; Woburn Process Company, Research 
Chemist; Wheat ena Corp.; Tasty Kake Company. 

JAEGER, Patricia, Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 1959 
at $5,148 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.A,, M.A,, Ph.D. University of 
Minnesota, 1953, 1956, 1959. Also received a diploma in Phonetics from the 
University of Grenoble, France in 1954. Has taught for the last five years 
at the University of Minnesota and has the highest recommendations from all 
her instructors. 

LANDOLFI, Carmela M. , Instructor in Mathematics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. Brooklyn College 1957; M.S. 
Ohio State University, March 1959. She taught part-time at Ohio State 
University from 1957-59. 

LANG LAND, Joseph, Associate Professor of English (Visiting Lecturer), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $7,527 per year (maximum). B.A. and M.A. State 
University of Iowa in 1940 and 1941. Head, English Department, Dana College, 
Nebraska, 1941-42; Assistant Professor, University of Wyoming, 1948-55; 
Associate Professor, University of Wyoming, 1955 to date. 

MacPHERSON, Richard F., Instructor in Physical Education, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. Spring- 
field College 1958, will receive M.S. University of Illinois in June 1959. 
He has served as Instructor in Physical Education at University of Illinois. 

MCCARTHY, Harold T., Assistant Professor of English (Visiting Lecturer), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $6,474 per year (maximum). B.A. University of 
Massachusetts, 1941; M.A. Harvard University, 1942; Ph.D. Harvard University, 
1950. He also attended the Sorbonne in Paris. Teaching experience is as 
follows: Teaching Assistant at Harvard; two years as instructor in naval 
subjects at USNT, Sampson, N.Y., and later as Officer- in- charge, School of 
Transient Personnel, USNRS, Boston; Instructor in English at Northwestern 
University, 1951-55; Lecturer in English at University of Maryland Overseas 
Program in Paris, 1955-59. 



Attachment D, Page 4 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

QFFNER, Elliot M. , Instructor in Art, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,356 
per year (5 steps above minimum). B.F.A. and M.F.A. Yale University in 1953 
and 1959. Free-lance jobs in lettering and illustrations from 1950-52; In- 
dustrial Designer, Steuben Glass, 1955-57; taught at Yale University 1958 to 
date. 

PHILLIPS, Rilla M. , Instructor in Philosophy, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.A. Whitman College 1950; M.A. Bryn 
Mawr 1954. Assistant in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr, 1952-54; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Bucknell University, 1957-59. 

QUINT, Howard H. , Professor of History, effective September 1, 1959 at $8,684 
per year (maximum). B.A. Yale, 1940; M.A. Stanford, 1942; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
University 1947. Teaching experience includes 11 years at the University of 
South Carolina and one year at National University of Mexico. Is presently 
Associate Director of Inter University Committee on the Superior Student at 
the University of Colorado. 

ROHDE, Richard A., Assistant Professor "A", Entomology and Plant Pathology, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $6,435 per year (2 steps above minimum). A.B. 
Drew University 1951; M.S. University of Maryland 1956; Ph.D. University of 
Maryland 1958. He has served one year since receiving the Ph.D. as special 
research appointee at the University of Maryland working in the field of 
Hematology. 

ROWLEY, John R. , Assistant Professor of Botany, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,538 per year (2 steps above minimum). A.B. University of California, 1950; 
M.A. University of Oregon, 1953; Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 1957. 
Laboratory Instructor at Sacred Heart General Hospital, Eugene, Oregon, 1951; 
Teaching Assistant, University of Oregon, 1952-53; Teaching Assistant, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, 1953-57; Instructor, University of Minnesota, 1957-58; 
National Science Foundation grantee in Zurich, Switzerland, 1958-59. 

SCOTT, Donald E. , Instructor in Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 
1959 at $5,148 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. in Electrical Engineer- 
ing University of Connecticut, 1957; expects M.S. in Electrical Engineering 
from same institution in June 1959. General Electric Company test program, 
June 1957 to January 1958; part-time graduate student and instructor, Univer- 
sity of Connecticut, 1958 to date. 

SHECKELS, G. Dale, Head of Department of Electrical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $9,464 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.S. in 
Electrical Engineering from University of Washington, 1938; M.S. in E.E. from 
M. I.T. , 1940; Ph.D. in E.E. from Iowa State College, 1955. His teaching ex- 
parience is as follows: Instructor at University of Washington, 1941-42; 
part-time A.S.T.P. Instructor at Harvard, 1943; Assistant Professor, 1945-49, 
Associate Professor, 1949-56 and Professor 1956 to present, all at Montana 
State College. His industrial experience includes a year with the U.S. Bureau 
of Fisheries, a year with Puget Sound Power & Light Co., three years as staff 
member of Radiation Laboratory of M.I.T. and a summer with General Electric 
Co. in Schenectady. 



Attachment D, Page 5 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

SILVER, Arnold, Assistant Professor of English, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). A.B. New York University, 1947; 
M.A. Columbia University, 1949; Ph.D. Columbia University, 1958. Has had ten 
years of teaching experience at New York University, Queens College and Ohio 
State University. 

STEINBERG, Melvin, Associate Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $7,254 per year (5 steps above minimum). B. S. and M.S. University of North 
Carolina, 1949 and 1951; Ph.D. Yale University, 1955. Graduate Assistant, 
University of North Carolina, 1949-51; Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, 
1951-52; Research Assistant at Yale, 1952-53; Assistant in instruction at 
Yale, 1953-55; Assistant Professor at Stevens Institute, 1955 to present. Now 
on leave from Stevens and traveling in Europe. 

TANNER, Mrs. Ann G. , Assistant Director of Placement for Women, effective 
September 1, 1959 at 45%3wHper year (1 a-bep-abuvti mlnft aumK A.B. Mary Baldwin 
College, 1943; M.A. North Carolina State College, 1957. Personnel Apprentice, 
Revere Copper and Brass, Inc., 1943-44; Assistant to Personnel Supervisor, 
Burlington Industries, Burlington, N.C. , 1944-45; Personnel Supervisor for 
Burlington Industries, 1945-47; Administrative Assistant, Burlington In- 
dustries, 1947-48; Personnel Director of 600 bed general hospital, Duke Hospital 
and Medical School, 1949-54; Research Assistant to Hospital Administrator on 
research project, 1955; Personnel Officer, The County Trust Co., White Plains, 
N.Y. , 1957-58; Jr. Clerk & Stenographer, Univ. of Mass., 1958 to date. 

WESTON, John C, Assistant Professor of English, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.A. University of California, 
1947; M.A. University of Chicago, 1950; Ph.D. University of North Carolina, 
1956. Part-time instructor at University of North Carolina, 1952-56 and a 
full-time instructor at University of Virginia, 1956 to date. 

WILCE, Robert L. , Instructor in Botany, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,148 
per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. University of Scranton, 1950; M.S. 
University of Vermont, 1952; Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1957. Has had ex- 
perience as Graduate Assistant and Teaching Fellow; Instructor, University of 
Michigan, 1957-58. He has also had professional experience as a collector and 
assistant at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory. 

ZUNIC, Matthew, Professor of Physical Education, effective September 1, 1959 
at $7,748 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. George Washington University, 
1942; served four years in Navy's Physical Fitness Program; played pro- 
fessional basketball with Washington Capitols. Assistant basketball coach, 
George Washington, 1951 and 1952. Appointed head basketball coach at Boston 
University in September 1952 to date. 

COHEN, Sol, Assistant Professor of Education, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,538 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.B.A. and M.A. The College of the 
City of New York, 1949 and 1952; M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1954. Is currently writing dissertation for Ph.D. degree. He has had three 
years of teaching experience in secondary schools of New York City and has 
been a Teaching Assistant to Dr. Cremin at Teachers College for two years. 



! ■ •. 



I 



I 



Attachment D, Page 6 
PROMOTIONS 

GARY, Harold W* , from Professor of History to Head of Department of History, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $9,643.92 per year. 

1 BYRNE, Joseph M* , from Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,981 per year* 

RIVERS, . Robert L. , from Assistant Professor of Finance to Associate Professor 
of General Business and Finance, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year* 

ZANE, Edward A. , from Instructor in Marketing to Assistant Professor of Market- 
ing, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,772 per year* 

PROMOTION AND MERIT INCREASE 

TRUESWELL, Richard W , from Instructor in Mechanical Engineering to Assistant 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective September 1, 1959, from $5,564 
(maximum) to $6,006 (4 steps above minimum). 

TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT 

BOICOURT, Mrs* Ruth C* , Instructor in Home Economics, for the period April 27 - 
May 1, 1959 at $21*75 per week (1/4 time). This is necessary because of the 
illness of Mrs* Esselen. 

MERIT INCREASES 

BETH, Loren P«, Professor of Government, effective September 6, 1959 from 
$7,124 to $7,748 (2 steps). 

CHISHOLM, Malcolm J., Assistant Physician, effective July 5, 1959 from $7,527 
to $8,125 (2 steps). 

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT OF TEACHING STAFF ON PROJECT AF 33(600)-35001 

To extend above project from December 20, 1958 to March 31, 1959* Payment w 4 .*3 
be at rate of 1/200 annual teaching salary (academic year) per day of work for 
following people: 

Dzialo, Frederick J*, Instructor, Civil Engineering - $24*70 per day e 
White, Merit P., Head of Department, Civil Engineering - $49*07 per day* 

REINSTATEMENT AND APPOINTMENT AS HALF-TIME INSTRUCTOR 

SULLIVAN, Mrs* Marjorie, Instructor in Home Economics, effective September 1, 
1959 at $2,470 per year* She is to assume a portion of Miss Strattner's program 
while she is on leave* She has assisted on the staff for several years in the 
past* She has been on leave of absence this past year in order to complete 
work for a master's degree* 



ii 



Attachment D, Page 7 
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

ARUNASALAM, V. , for Summer Asaistantship. One of the items in the budget of 
the Research Proposal, for which we received the $7,500 grant from the Research 
Corporation, is "Summer 1959: full-time assistantship (12 weeks) for graduate 
student - $1,000." Mr* Arunasalam will begin in this way research which will 
include his master's thesis research* He has been doing well in his graduate 
courses here and should continue to prove worthy of financial assistance* The 
dates to be covered are 6-7-59 to 8*29-59 at $83*33 per week* 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of Hay and June, 1959* 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Summer School Employment 



Attachment D, Page 8 



The following personnel appointments are recommended for the operation of the 
various summer programs at the University of Massachusetts: 

School of Engineering Faculty 





• 






Weekly 








% of 


Annual 


Rate to 


Gross 


Name 


Title 


Time 


Rate 


be Paid 


Earnings 




June 8 


- 26, 1959 






Cash in, Kenneth D. 


Assoc* Prof* 


100 


$7254 


$181*35 


$544*05 


Costa, Armand J. 


Asst* Prof* 


100 


5772 


144,30 


432* 90 


Goodchlld, Irwin L, , Jr. 


Instructor 


100 


4732 


118.30 


354*90 


Hopkins, Walter 


Asst* Prof* 


100 


5538 


138*45 


415.35 


Laestadius, John E. 


Assoc* Prof* 


100 


6435 


160*87 


482.61 


Patterson, Robert K* 


Assoc, Prof* 


100 


6981 


174.52 


523.56 


Roys, Carl S* 


Head Dept* 


100 


9828 


245.70 


737.10 




June 29 - 


July 17, 


1959 






Costa, Armand J. 


Asst* Prof* 


100 


5772 


144.30 


432.90 


Hopkins, Walter 


Asst* Prof* 


100 


5538 


138.45 


415.35 


Patterson, Robert K. 


Assoc* Prof* 


100 


6981 


174.52 


523.56 



Swenson, John D* 



Costa, Armand J* 
Laestadius, John E. 
Patterson, Robert K. 
Roys, Carl S. 



July 20 - August 7, 1959 

Professor 100 8684 

August 3-21, 1959 

Asst* Prof* 100 5772 

Assoc. Prof* 100 6435 

Assoc* Prof* 100 6981 

Head Dept* 100 9828 

August 17 * September 4, 1959 



Goodchlld, Irwin L*, Jr* Instructor 100 4732 

Step increase due 8-30*59 100 4940 

Lindsey, E* Ernest Head Dept* 100 9828 

August 24 - September 11, 1959 

Costa, Armand J* Asst* Prof* 100 5772 

Step increase due 8*30-59 100 6006 

Laestadius, John E* Assoc* Prof* 100 6435 

Step increase due 9-6-59 100 6708 

Patterson, Robert K* Assoc* Prof* 100 6981 

Step increase due 9-6-59 100 7254 

Soys, Carl S* Head Dept* 100 9828 

Demoted to Prof* , 9-1-59 100 8684 



217.10 



144.30 
160*87 
174.52 
245.70 



118*30 
123*50 
245.70 



144* 30 
150.15 
160.87 
167.70 
174*52 
181.35 
245.70 
217*10 



651*30 



432*90 
482.61 
523*56 
737*10 



360.10 
737.10 



444.60 
489.44 
530. 39 
685. 62 









VA 






Attachment D, Page 9 

SPECIAL EMPLOYMENT (Engineering) 

Weekly 
% of Annual Rate to Cross 
Name Title Time Rate be Paid Earnings 

Higgins, George R. Aest. Prof, 100 $5538 $133.45 $750.00 

Professor Higgins will attend an ASEE-AEC Summer Institute on Nuclear Energy 
for engineering college teachers to be held at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. , 
June 22 through August 14, 1959. The terms of the grant from the Institute state 
that "his institution will be required to grant to him an amount at least equal to 
one month's salary in addition to the salary for the academic year. •••The AEC will 
match this contribution to a maximum of $7 50, 00 3 and in addition will provide a 
travel allowance for eaoh participant." It is raeonnumded that Professor Higgins 
be employed for five and one*hc*.i£ weeks, July 7 - August 14, 1959, at a weekly rate 
of $138.45, gross pay not to exceed $750.00. 

Marcus, Joseph S. Asooc. Prof. 100 $7254 $181.35 $806.00 

Professor Marcus will attend a Nuclear Energy Institute at the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, from June 22 to August 14, 1959, under terms similar 
to those for Professor Higgins. The funds for Professor Marcus are to be provided 
from the Teachers Research Fund in the amount of $806.00. 

Sawa, Martin J. Instructor 100 $4316 $107.90 $647.40 

Mr. Sawa, of the Van Norman Machine Company, Springfield, Massachusetts is 
recommended to assist in teaching Mechanical Engineering 28, Machine Shop Course, 
from June 8 to June 26 and from June 29 to July 17, 1?59» Tne Van Norman Machine 
Company has agreed to make Mr. Sawa available for the above periods of time at the 
beginning rate of Instructor. His salary is to be paid to the company and they in 
turn will continue Mr. Sawa on their payroll for social security purposes and 
reimburse him for extra travel. Mr* Sawa taught at the University during the last 
two summers under similar arrangements. 

OTHER SUMMER EMPLOYMENT <not including Main Sessions) 

MacConnell, William Assoc. Prof. 100 $6708 $167.70 $503.10 

Professor MacConnell will teach Forestry 55, The Elements of Forest Mensuration, 
from June 8 through June 26, 1959. 

Skillings, Henry H. Instructor 100 $5564 $139.10 $1251.90 

Mr. Skillings is recommended to act as assistant to the Provost, supervise 
summer scheduling of freshmen and balancing of section sizes, assist in the alloca- 
tion of office space for new faculty 3 help with the direction of the Summer Sessions, 
and continue the investigation of ajiomatlon for scheduling. The period of employ- 
ment would be June 29 through August 28, 1959. 



Attachment D, Page 10 



NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 
(Sutnmer Institute for High School Mathematics Teachers) 



The Summer Institute for High School Mathematics Teachers will be conducted at 
the University from June 29 through August 15, 1959. Tuition payments by the In- 
stitute for students in this program will be $4,320. The recommendation below on 
personnel appointments for the program provides for a like sum to be provided from 
State Funds toward teachers salaries with the balance of these salaries provided by 
Institute Funds. 

Weekly 
% of Annual Rate to Gross 
Name __ . . Title Time Rate be Paid Earnings 



(From State Funds) 



Cullen, Helen F. Assoc. Prof. 

Will teach only 6-29 to 7-17-59 
Loomis, Harold G. Assoc. Prof. 

Visiting Professor 
Rose, Israel H. Assoc. Prof. 



Wagner, Robert W. 



Professor 



95 

95 

95 
95 



$7254 

6708 

7527 
8684 



$172.28 $516.84 
159.31 1115.17 



178.77 
206.24 



1251.39 

1443.68 

$4327.08 



Summation of salaries for the above: 



Name 



State Funds 



Grant Funds 



Gross Salary 



Cullen, Helen F. 
Loomis, Harold G. 
Rose, Israel H. 
Wagner, Robert W. 



$ 516.84 
1115.17 
1251.39 
1443.68 

$4327.08 



$ 83.16 

684.83 

548.61 

356.32 

$1672.92 



$ 600 
1800 
1800 
1800 

$6000 



Attachment D, Page 11 



NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 
(Summer Institute for High School Biology Teachers) 



The Summer Institute for High School Biology Teachers will be conducted at the 
University of Massachusetts from June 29 through August 15, 1959. Tuition payments 
by the Institute for students in this program will be $2660, The recommendation be- 
low on personnel appointments for the program provides for a like sum to be pro- 
vided from State Funds toward teachers salaries with the balance of these salaries 
provided by Institute Funds, In each case the figure under Weekly Rate to be Paid 
is 48% of the amount determined by Load and Annual Salary . 



Name 



Title 



% of 
Time 



Annual 
Rate 



Weekly 
Rate to 
be Paid 



Gross 
Earnings 



(From State Funds) 

Bartlett, Lawrence M. Assoc. Prof, 100 

Directs Institute, will be working 6-1 through 

Davis, Edward L. Asst. Prof. 25 

Gentile, Arthur C. Asst. Prof. 100 

Will teach 8-2 through 8-13-59 

Randall, William E. , Jr. Assoc. Prof. 33.3 

Rauch, Harold Assoc. Prof. 100 

Will teach 7-22 through 7-31-59 

Roberts, John L. Asst. Prof, 100 

Will teach 7-1 through 7-18-59 

Snyder, Dana P. Asst. Prof. 100 

Swenson, Paul A. Asst. Prof. 100 

Will teach 8-2 through 8-13-59 

Traver, Jay R. Assoc. Prof. 25 



Summation of salaries for the above: 



$7527 
8-22-59 

5304 

5772 

7254 
6981 

6006 

6006 
6006 

7254 



$ 90.32 $1083.84 



15.91 
69.26 

29.01 
83.76 

72.07 

72.07 
72.07 

21.75 



111.37 
124.66 

203.07 
134.01 

187.38 

504.49 
129.72 

152.25 
$2630.79 



Name 



State Funds 


Grant Funds 


Gross Salary 


$1083.84 


$ 716.16 


$1800.00 


111.37 


343 . 63 


455.00 


124.66 


261.06 


385.72 


203.07 


397.18 


600.25 


134.01 


251.71 


385.72 


187.38 


455.49 


642.87 


504,49 


1295.56 


1800.05 


129.72 


256.00 


385.72 


152.25 


302.75 


455.00 



Bartlett, Lawrence M. 
Davis, Edward L, 
Gentile, Arthur C. 
Randall, William E. , Jr, 
Rauch, Harold 
Roberts, John L. 
Snyder, Dana P. 
Swenson, Paul A, 
Traver, Jay R. 



$2630.79 



$4279,54 



$6910.33 



Attachment D, Page 12 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Division of Employment Security 

Counsellor Training Program 



The Division of Employment Security is providing funds for the conduct of a 
training course for their counsellors from July 6 through July 31, 1959, under the 
direction of Dr. Claude C. Neet, Head of the Department of Psychology. Salaries 
have been determined on the basis of an hourly rate commensurate with the standard 
summer sessions salary scale. The Division of Employment Security has provided a 
fund of $2500 for salaries. 



Name 



Title 



Contact 


Annual 


Hourly 


Gross 


Hours 


Rate 


Rate 


Earnings 


43 


$8372 


$13.23 


$568.89 


26 


4940 


10.37 


269.62 


43 


8684 


13.73 


590.39 


16 


6240 


13.10 


209.60 


20 


9828 


20.64 


412.80 



Field, William F.* Director of Guidance 
Miller, Robert V.# Instructor 
Morrissey, Robert J. ^placement Officer, Men 
Myers, Jerome Asst. Prof. 
Neet, Claude C. Head of Dept. 



$2051.30 



* Dr. Field and Mr. Morrissey are on Class "A" pay status, but they will be con- 
ducting their portions of the program during their vacations which are, 
respectively, June 29 through July 24, and July 13 through July 31, 1959. 

# Mr. Miller will be teaching a full load in the first main Summer Session during 
this same period. The compensation represented here is for the additional load 
of this course. 



FIRST MAIN SUMMER SESSION 
June 22 - July 31, 1959 



Attachment D, Page 13 



Name 



Title 



% of 
Time 



Annual 
Rate 



Weekly 
Rate to 
be Paid 



Gross 
Earnings 



Azpeitia, Alphonso G. 

Beth, Lor en P. 

Burak, George J. 

Caldwell, Theodore C. 

Chametzky, Jules 
*Coffin, Gregory C. 

Czarnecki, Reynold B. 

DiMinno, Rosemarie 

Eddy, S. Philip 

Ehrlich, Leonard H. 

Feldtoan, Robert S* 

Ferrigno, James M. 

Gamble, Philip L. 
*Halsey, Van R. , Jr. 

Harper, Richard D. 

Kaplan, Sidney 

Kyler, Rudolph H. 

Lane, Robert P. 

Lea, Henry A* 

Martin, Richard S* 

Matheson, Donald R, 

McManamy, Mary Elizabeth 

McWhorter, Earl J* 

Miller, Robert V. 

Neet, Claude C. 

Ober lander, George J* 

Oliver, Charles F. 

Page, Alex 

Ragle, John L. 
*Rothman, Stanley 

Singer, Frank A, 

Smith, Harold L , Jr. 
*Swan, Sarah Ann 

Teichner, Warren H. 
*Thoms, Agnes Kemmer 

Trahan, Elizabeth W. 

Trumbull, Ann H. 

Tucker, Robert G« 

van Steenberg, John R. 

Weidmann, George P. 

Wexler, Sidney F. 

Wilkinson, Thomas 0. 

Williams, Arthur R. 

Witham, Francis H. 

Wyman, Raymond 

Wynne, Alfred M. 

Yablonsky, Lewis 



Ass t. Prof., Math 100 $6006 $150.15 $ 900.90 

Prof., Govt. 100 7124 178.10 1068.60 

Instr.,Bus. 50 5148 64.35 386.10 

Head 0ept.,Hist. 50 9828 122.85 737.10 

Instr., Engl. 50 5564 69.55 417.30 

Ass t. Prof., Educ. 100 6006 150.15 900.90 

Asst.Frof.,Bact. 75 6474 121.38 728.28 

Instr. ,2ool. 62.5 4524 70.68 424.08 

Asst.Frof.,Educ. 100 5304 132.60 795.60 

Instr., Phil. 50 4940 61.75 370.50 

Prof., Psych. 50 8372 104.65 627.90 

Prof., Rom. Lang. 5& 8372 104.65 627*90 

Head Dept.,Econ. 100 9828 245.70 1474.20 

Instr., Hist. 50 5564 69.55 417.30 

Asst. Prof., Speech 50 6006 75.07 450.42 

Aest, Prof., Engl. 50 6474 80.92 485i-52 

Assoc. Prof. ,3us. 50 7527 94.08 564.48 

Assoc. Prof., Engl. 100 7254 181.35 1088.10 

Instr. , German 100 5564 139.10 634.60 

Asst. Prof., Econ, 100 5538 138.45 830.70 

Asst. Prof., Art 50 5538 69,22 415.32 

Instr., Educ. 100 5148 ... 128.70 772„20 

Asst. Prof. ,Chem. 75 5772 108.22 649*32 

Instr. , Psych. 100 4940 123.50 741*00 

Head Dept., Psych. 50 9828 122.85 737,10 

Instr. ,Chem. 62.5 5564 86.93 521*58 

Assoc. Prof., Educ. 100 7527 188.17 1129.02 

A8St.Prof.,Engl. 50 5304 66.30 397.80 

Asst. Prof. ,Chem. 50 5304 66.30 397.80 

Asst. Prof., Govt. 100 5538 138.45 830*70 

Assoc. Prof., Bus. 50 6981 87.26 523.56 

Instr., Rom. Lang. 50 4940 61.75 370*50 

Instr. ,2ool. 50 4316 53.95 323.70 

Assoc. Prof., Psych. 50 7254 90.67 544.02 

Instr. , Speech 50 4316 53.95 323.70 

Instr., Germ, ,Russ. 100 4732 118.30 709.80 

Asst. Prof., Educ. 100 5772 144.30 865.80 

Instr., Engl. 50 5564 69.55 417.30 

Instr., Hist. 100 5356 133.90 803.40 

Assoc. Prof. ,Engin. 62.5 6708 104.81 *2fr^86 

Assoc. Prof., Rom. Langr. 50 6708 83*85 503*19 

Asst. Prof. ,Sociol. 100 6474 161.85 971.10 

Assoc, Prof., Engl. 50 6981 87.26 523.56 

Instr. , Botany 62.5 4316 67.43 404.58 

Prof., Educ. 100 8060 201.50 1209.00 

Instr. ,Chem. 75 5356 100.42 602.52 

Asst.Prof.,Sociol. 100 5772 144.30 865.80 



*Non»University employee 



1 : 



Attachment D, Page 14 



SECOND MAIN SUMMER SESSION 
July 27 - September 4, 1959 



Name 



Title 



% of 

Time 



Annual 
Rate 



Weekly 
Rate to 
be Paid 



Gross 
Earnings 



Andersen, Allen E. Head Dept* Hath. 
Anthony, Albert S, Assoc, Prof. Educ. 
Step increase effective 8-30-59 



Beck, Mildred-Louise* 
Boudreau, Harold L. 
Bout el le, Harold D. 
Cannon, George W. 
Clark, David R. 
Fink, Seymour* 
Gordon, Harold J. , Jr. 
Gozzi, Raymond D. 
Harris, John S. 
Heller, Peter 
Helming, Vernon P. 
Howard, Marshall C. 
Kates, Sol is L. 
King, C. Wendell 



Asst.Prof. Educ. 
Inst. Rom. Lang. 
Assoc. Prof. Math. 
Prof. Chem. 
Assoc. Prof. Engl. 
Inst. Music 
Assoc. Prof. Hist. 
Inst. Engl. 
Head Dept. Govt. 
Assoc. Prof, , Germ. 
Prof. Engl, 
Assoc. Prof. Econ. 
Prof. Psych. 
Prof. Sociology 



Step increase effective 8-30-59 



Kornegay, William G. 
Krzystofik, Anthony T. 
McCartney, Robert* 
Nutting, William B. 
Ober lander, George J. 



Asst.Prof. Educ. 
Inst, Business 
Asst.Prof. Econ. 
Asst.Prof. Zool. 
Inst. Chem. 



Period of employment will be 8-4 through 9 
O'Donnell, William G. Prof. Engl. 

Step increase effective 8-30-59 
O'Leary, Helen P. Assoc. Prof. Educ. 

Step increase effective 8-30-59 
Peirce, Henry B. Asst.Prof. Speech 
Rivers, Robert L. Asst.Prof., Bus. 

Promoted to Assoc. Prof., 9-1-59 
Rogers, Vincent R. Asst.Prof. Educ* 
Smith, Harold L. , Jr. Inst. Rom. Lang. 

Step increase effective 8-30-59 
Stidham, Howard D. Asst.Prof. Chem. 

Step increase effective 8-30-59 
Tucker, Robert G. Inst. Engl. 
Whetstone, Robert W.* Asst.Prof. Educ. 
Zajicek, Oliver T. Inst. Chem. 
Zeender, John K. Assoc. Prof . Hist. 



50 
100 

100 

50 
100 

75 

50 

50 

50 

50 
100 

50 

50 
100 
100 
100 

100 

50 
100 

62.5 

62.5 
■11-59 

50 

100 

50 
50 

100 
50 

50 

50 

100 

75 

50 



$9828 
6981 
7254 
6474 
4940 
7527 
8634 
6708 
4316 
6435 
5564 
8736 
7527 
8684 
7254 
8004 
8060 
8372 
5538 
4940 
6474 
6474 
5564 

8372 
8684 
6435 
6708 
6240 
6240 
6981 
6474 
4940 
5148 
5538 
5772 
5564 
6474 
5143 
7254 



$122.85 

174.52 

181.35 

161.85 

61.75 

188.17 

162.82 

83.85 

53.95 

80.43 

69.55 

218.40 

94.08 

108.55 

181.35 

200.10 

201.50 

209.30 

138.45 

61.75 

161.85 

101.15 

86.93 

104.65 

108.55 

160.87 

167.70 

78.00 

78.00 

87.26 

161.85 

61.75 

64.35 

69.22 

72.15 

69.55 

161.85 

96.52 

90.67 



$ 737.10 

1053.95 
971.10 
370.50 

1129.02 
976.92 
503.10 
323.70 
482. 58 
417.30 

1310.40 
564.48 
651.30 

1088.10 

1200.60 

1216.80 
830.70 
370.50 
971.10 
606.90 
521.58 



631.80 

972.05 
468.00 

477.26 
971.10 

373.10 

418,25 
417.30 
971.10 
579.12 
544.02 



4i 



in."M> 






■<y 



l^ 



* Won- University employee. 



/MnrAcnMrrr- e 



The following School o£ Nursing faculty recommendations pertaining to 
tuition waiver for graduate nurses in cooperating agencies utilized in 
the clinical portion of the nursing program are submitted for Board 
of Trustee approval. 

I. Tuition Waiver - calendar year - Twenty-four (24) waivers 
of tuition may be granted to graduate nurses in 
agencies utilized in clinical experience for the 
students of the University of Massachusetts School 
of Nursing. 

II. Eligibility - (Categories) - 

Supervisors, head nurses and/or staff nurses working 
with the University of Massachusetts School of Nursing 
faculty and nursing students. 

III. Allotment - Yearly allotment (one-half granted each semester 
and/or during summer term) 

Springfield Hospital - 12 

Wesson Maternity Hospital - 4 

Springfield Health Department - 4 
Springfield Visiting Nurse Association - 4 
Unused tuit io n waiver allcttad to an agency (for the 
calendar year) may be used within the year by graduate 
nurses in any one of the designated cooperating 
agencies. 

IV. Selection of graduate nurses for tuition waiver - 

The Director of Nursing in each cooperating agency 
shall submit the names and position of the graduate 
nurses, whom she wishes to recommend, to the Dean of 
the School of Nursing. 

The Dean of the School of Nursing shall review these 
recommendations, and present the names for considera- 
tion to the President of the University prior to the 
date of Registration. 



Summary : Total Tuition Waiver (Calendar Year) 



Based On 
Current Beginning 



Tuition Sept. 1959 

Springfield Hospital 12 (3 point courses) $180 $3*3 3«^ 

Wesson Maternity Hospital 4 (3 point courses) 60 120 

Springfield Health Department 4 (3 point courses) 60 120 
Springfield Visiting Nurse 

Association 4 (3 point courses) 60 120 

$360 $720 



"EWT $) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

Frm Graduate 0mce Date AprU 30, 1<*Q 

To . , . Mr. John. Gillespie, Secretary of. the. Univer si ty 

The Graduate School Council has voted approval of the foil™™* „,v^,* 
to approval by the University of Massachusetts Board of Tru^eesT^ d 

A. Credit for problem courses: 

o^th^i^t^ 01111116 ^ the followin S change in the last sentence 
•£ a * fl 2 P ara S^ph on page 11 of the Graduate Catalog: If a 

£2ftX £ Qr \l ^ eS * S ' Pr ° blem Courses shsai be """ed *c six 
credits; if a thesis is not offered, the limit shall be nine credits. 

B. B USINESS AD MINISTRATION 

1. The Council recommends that the following courses be dropped- Business 
Administration 201, THE BUSINESS 32TOPRISE, and Bu sines IS 
tion 272, SEMINAR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Administra- 

2. The Council recommends the addition of the following courses: 

flJSS * f S? TRATI ° N 20? > CASE AWALYSIS ™ REP ™ WRITING.- 
Concentrated study in the practice and analysis of business 

problems and in the writing of formal reports through the means 

01 CaSes# Credit, 3. 

The Staff. 

t BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 2*1, PRINCIPLES AND POLICIES OF ADMNISTRA. 

EShEE i S ia08d °? Ur f to the Theory of B ^siness Administration, 
r^?w ? S ? !? neri ° functions of management, organization theoi4, 
policy formulation and systematic corporate decision making. 

Credit, 3. 
The Staff. 

C, The Council recommends approval of a program in GERMAN leading to the 
Master of Arts degree: 

MASTER OF ARTS B Mjj 
F. C. Ellert, Major Adviser 

and lTO^I^^^^^S' Undergraduate work in German languages 
Si?« n TQ e ^Yf le T nt ™ ^e requirement for a B.A. degree with a 
atmtft fZZ^ ^ i niVG f i . ty ° f ^ssaehusetts, and indication of 
Soutd and In^ffZrif gradu f e / ork - deficiencies in literary back- 
nl w„™ \l ^sufficient command of spoken or written German must be made 

the dfgree! Candldate Can be •*Bi«ed to certain courses required for 
a r J^ffi^ /° r J h± f n 9gree the Student "M* have or "MSt acquire 



- 2 - 



Program of stu dy: A minimum of twenty-one credits in the major 
field* Twelve of these credits must be earned in "courses open to 
graduate student only" (200 series) unless a student chooses to offer 
a thesis in lieu of six of these credits. The "Proseminar" is re- 
quired. One course must be of linguistic character} this will normally 
be the course in Middle High German. 

If the program is approved, the German Department will drop the 
following courses: 

222 

58 and 158 
68 and 168 

COURS ES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 
TFor either major or minor credit ) " 

200. PROBLEM COURSE. -Directed study in some special area of literature 
or linguistics. Credit, 3-6. 

The Staff. 

201. MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN* -Readings in Middle High German literature in 
the original with an introduction to the grammar. Credit, 3* 

Mr, ONeil. 

202. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE MEDDLE AGES, -A study of German literature 
from the earliest literary documents to the 15th Century, Credit , 3. 

Mr. Ellert. 

205. STYLISTICS.-An advanced course in German composition, audio-lingual 
proficiency, and grammar. Credit, 3. 

Miss Schiffer, Mr* ! Neil, Mr. Ellert. 

210, PROSEMINAR, -Introduction to methods of literary interpretation and 
research. Reports and papers. Required of all majors, Credit, 3» 

Tae Staff. 

220. SEMINAR, -A close study of a single topic or author. The subject 
matter will vary from year to year. Group discussions, reports, and 
papers, Credit, 3# 

The Staff. 

300. THESIS, MASTER 1 S DEGREE, Credit, 6-9. 

COURSES OP EN TO BOTH GRA DUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit) 

151. Nineteenth Century Prose. Credit, 3. 

152. Poetry and Drama of the Nineteenth Century. Credit, 3* 

153. Twentieth Century Prose. Credit, 3. 
15U. Poetry and Drama of the Twentieth Century. Credit, 3. 

155. Storm and Stress. Credit, 3. 

156. Romanticism. Credit, 3. 
157* Goethe's Faust. Credit, 3. 

159. The Germanic Languages. Credit, 3. 

160. The Classical Period. Credit, 3# 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2091 



Philip F. 
Whitmore 



MINUTES OF SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

June 6, 1959, 10:30 a.m., Student Union Building, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brown, Cashin, 
Crowley, Haigis, McNamara, Miss 
Schuck, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 

having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, 

President Mather called the meeting to order. Upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Mr. Philip F. Whitmore as Chairman 
pro tern of the Board of Trustees. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
May 19, 1959 were approved as distributed. 

Provost Shannon McCune was invited to join the meeting. 

On recommendation of the Faculty and the President and 

on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award degrees to the persons listed in 

the Commencement program which is Attachment 
A to these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

On recommendation of the Faculty of the Graduate School 

and the President and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award the following graduate degrees to 

the candidates as listed in the Commencement 
program, Attachment A to these minutes, and 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

Upon recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Recognize4 By-Laws 

Student Activities and the President and upon motion duly made and 

seconded, the By-Laws of the Board of Trustees were amended so that 

Article IV is now as follows: 



Degrees 



2092 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Article IV. There shall be eight standing committees 
to wit: (1) Committee on Finance; (2) Committee on 
Faculty and Program of Study; (3) Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds ; (4) Committee on Agriculture and 
Horticulture; (5) Committee on Recognized Student 
Activities; (6) Committee on Legislation; (7) Athletic 
Committee; (8) Executive Committee. 

The powers and the actions of the standing committees 
shall be subject to the approval and consent of the 
Board of Trustees. The Committee on Finance shall 
act on matters involving finances of the University 
or of the Board and is authorized to purchase and 
sell securities between meetings of the Board of 
Trustees, reporting its actions at subsequent meet- 
ings of the Board. The Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study shall act on matters affecting the per- 
sonnel of the University and the course of resident 
instruction offered by all departments of the University, 
it shall also act on requirements for admission. The 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds shall act on matters 
involving the location and construction of new build- 
ings, remodeling of old buildings, and any matters affect- 
ing the physical planning of the University and its 
grounds. The Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 
shall act upon matters pertaining to Agriculture and 
Horticulture. The Committee on Recognized Student 
Activities shall act upon matters pertaining to academic 
activities, student government and other recognized stu- 
dent organizations or groups. The Committee on Legisla- 
tion shall act in the furtherance of such legislative 
proposals as may be recommended by the Board of Trustees. 
The Athletic Committee shall act upon matters pertaining 
to organized athletics. The Executive Committee shall 
act for the Board of Trustees in intervals between 
Board meetings. 

Minutes of all Committee meetings shall be sent by the 
Secretary to all members of the Board as soon as possible 
after each meeting. 

Members of these standing committees shall be elected 
annually by ballot. 

The Chairman of the Board of Trustees and the President 
of the University shall be members ex-officio of all 
standing committees. 

A new member appointed to fill a vacancy in the Board 
of Trustees shall be assigned by the Chairman to the 
Committee in which there is a vacancy, to hold such 
position until the next annual meeting. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Special committees may be appointed or chosen from time 
to time as the Trustees at any meeting may deem 
expedient . 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions, and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment B which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

President Mather announced that Miss Winifred Eastwood, 

Head, Extension Division of Home Economics, had been selected by 

the United States Department of Agriculture to participate in an 

exchange team of Home Economists to visit Russia this summer. On 

recommendation of the President and on motion duly made and seconded, 

it was 



VOTED : To approve Miss Eastwood's participation as 
a member of the exchange team for a trip to 
Russia from approximately July 20 through 
August 31 at full salary on a leave with-pay- 
basis and retaining all the rights and 
benefits relating to full employment status. 

Employees of the Western Massachusetts Public Health 

Service located on the campus at the University often participate 

in the education of University students. In line with established 

policy, the President recommended that such employees be entitled 



to take courses at the University without the payment of tuit 



ion, 



Upon his recommendation and on motion duly made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED: Employees of the Western Massachusetts Public 
Health Service who are assigned to the campus 
of the University of Massachusetts and who 
are at a comparable rank of Instructor or 
above may be eligible to take courses in an 
established program and have the tuition 
waived if, in the judgment of the Provost, 
the employee has participated significantly 
in the educational program of the University 
students. 



2093 



Personnel 
Actions 



Winifred 
Eastwood" 



Employees 
of WMPHS - 
tuition waived 



2094 



TRUSTEE 



Language 
Institute 



Assistant 
Director - 
Student 
Activities 

Student Union 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather announced that the University of Massa- 
chusetts received one of four special language grants for the im- 
provement of secondary school language teachers awarded by the De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare in the amount of $106,000. 
The University was so designated because of the up-to-date language 
laboratory facilities that will be available in the new Liberal Arts 
Building plus the high type of work the language faculty has been 
doing under a Carnegie grant. On recommendation of the President 
and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to execute a contract with the 
United States Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, Office of Educa- 
tion, in the amount of $106,000 for a 
Language Institute under Public Law 
85-864 for the period May 20, 1959 to 
June 30, 1960. 

The increase in student activity and the amount of 
finances involved in student organizations have required some re- 
organization so that these functions will be properly supervised. 
A new position for the Student Union, Assistant Director - Student 
Activities, has been created. It is to be financed through the re- 
sources of the Student Senate and/or the Student Union. A committee 
established for the selection of the Assistant Director - Student 
Activities, has nominated Mr. Edward A. Buck who is now Assistant 
Director of the Student Union. The position is Group XVI. On 
recommendation of the President and on motion duly made and seconded 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the appointment of Edward A. Buck 
to the new position of Assistant Director - 
Student Activities of the Student Union. 



TRUSTEE 



2095 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather announced that Robert Leavitt, Executive 

Director of the Associate Alumni, has resigned effective August 31, 

1959. The University has been contributing toward his salary on 

the basis of 2/3 of a Group XIV position - Field Agent. In a 1955 

policy statement, the President announced that at some future time 

State monies would not be used to pay in part the salary of the 

Executive Director. However, the President pointed out that the 

University does have an obligation to keep track of its alumni and 

thus would continue to maintain the clerical employees in the 

Associate Alumni Office engaged in this work. Because the Associate 

Alumni is now recruiting a new Executive Director, the President 

recommended that starting September 1, 1959 the University cease 

its financial contribution as a part payment of the salary of an 

Executive Director. On the President's recommendation and upon 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : Effective September 1, 1959 the University 
cease its financial assistance to the 
Associate Alumni in the form of a partial 
payment of the salary of its Executive 
Director. 

And, it was 

VOTED : That Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts who are members of the Associate Alumni 
and under the direction of Trustee Crowley 
confer with the officers of the Associate 
Alumni to explain the need for and the ad- 
vantages from a policy which places the 
salary of the Executive Director, Associate 
Alumni, under the responsibility of the 
Associate Alumni. 

On motion duly made and seconded, the following schedule 

of Trustee meetings was approved: 



Associate 
Alumni 



Salary of 
Director 



2096 



TRUSTEE 



Schedule of 

Trustee 

Meetings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



August 4, 1959 - Budget Meeting 
September 15, 1959 - Convocation Meeting 
November 3, 1959 - Fall Meeting 
January 5, 1960 - Winter Meeting 
February 23, 1960 - Annual Meeting 
April 26, 1960 - Spring Meeting 
June 4, 1960 - Commencement Meeting 
June 28, 1960 - Budget Meeting 



The Board adjourned at ll:50,-a^m. 




Secretary 



Attachment B, Page 1 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
June 6, 1939 



APPOINTMENTS 



BOYLE, Richard W. , Instructor in Civil Engineering (% time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year, B.S.C.E. University of Massachusetts, 
1957. Has been admitted to Graduate School to Work for M.S. in C.E. 

HUMPHREY, Thomas F.» Instructor in Civil Engineering (% time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. B.S. in C.Ei Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute, June 1959. Has been admitted to Graduate School to work for 
li.S. in C.E. 

KENNEY, Peter J* , Instructor in Chemical Engineering (Teaching Associate 
% time), effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year* B.S. in Chemical 
Engineering i University of Massachusetts, 1957. Since then he has been 
employed by Columbia- Southern Chemical Corporation at Barberton, Ohio, 

WEAVER, Jatiet Elizabeth, Instructor in Home Economics, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,316 per year. B.A. Allegheny College, 1955; M.S. 
Pennsylvania State University, 1958. Psychologist at Polk State School, 
Polk, Pa. , 1956-58; since then has been helping out at Nursery School at 
University of Massachusetts and taking education courses. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINI MUM 

EDDY, Lyle K, , Assistant Professor of Education, effective September 1, 1959 
at $6,240 per year (5 steps above minimum). A.B. Nebraska State Teachers, 
1941 j M.A. University of Chicago, 1948. Experience as follows: 4 years high 
school teaching, Gayville, S.D. ; 4 years commissioned officer in Army; 2 years 
research assistant, Columbia; 5 years staff of Emory University, Ga. ; 1 year 
staff Monmouth College, N.J. 

FRINK, Orrin, Assistant Professor of German (Russian), effective September 1, 
1959 at $5,538 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.A. Haverford College, 1954; 
M.A. Middlebury College, 1955; Ph.D. Harvard University, 1959. Also attended 
Russian Summer Schools at Pennsylvania State University and Middlebury College 
and in 1954-55 was Fulbright Scholar at University of Leyden, Holland, study- 
ing the Slavic languages. Has taught Russian for past two semesters at 
Harvard and has also been engaged in linguistic research at Harvard Computation 
Laboratory as Russian advisor and digital computer in special area of 
automatic language translation. 

GORDON, Harold J., Jr., Associate Professor of History, effective September 1, 
1959 at $6,435 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.A. University of Richmond, 
1940; M.A, Yale University, 1948; Ph.D. Yale University, 1953. Teaching ex- 
perience is as follows: Dumbarton High School, Richmond, Va* , 1941-42; Army, 
World War II; Assistant Instructor in History, The Johns Hopkins University, 
1946-47; Assistant Director, Office of Veterans 1 Affairs, Yale University, 
1949-50; Military Intelligence Research Specialist, Department of the Army, 
1951-55; Instructor in History, University of Pittsburg 1955-57; Assistant 
Professor of History, University of Pittsburg* 1957 to date. Author - two 
books and many articles. 



i ( 



Attachment B, Page 2 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

HARRIS, Mrs, Grace, Assistant Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, 
1959 at $6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.A. and M.A. University of 
Chicago, 1945 and 1949; Ph.D. Cambridge University, 1955. She has taught for 
two years in the Africa Studies Program at Boston University, and, on a part- 
time basis at Smith College; has published two articles in the American 
Anthropologist , has more publications underway; has spent two years in the 
field in Kenya. 

HERCHENREDER, Herbert Alvin, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $5,564 (maximum). B.S.E.E. University of Missouri, 1951; 
M.S.E.E. University of Connecticut, 1957. Electronic Scientist at U.S. Navy 
Underwater Sound Laboratory at New London, Conn. 1951-54; in the army 1954-56; 
Research Assistant, University of Connecticut, 1956 to date. 

JOHNSON, Ernest A., Instructor "A" Agricultural Engineering, effective July 1, 
1959 at $5,772 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, University of Massachusetts, 1953; expects M.S. in June 1959 from Purdue 
University. He was a cooperating U.S.D.A. Engineer at Purdue in 1953-54 and 
then returned to Massachusetts to operate the family farm. From January to 
August 1955 he was an Instructor "A" in Agricultural Engineering at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. From September 1955 to date returned to Purdue with 
the U.S.D.A. and to pursue graduate work. Author of technical papers. 

KENNEDY, Richard M. , Instructor in Mathematics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $4,524 per year (1 step above minimum). B.A. and M.A. University of 
Massachusetts, 1957 and 1959. He wishes to teach for a year or two before 
going on to further graduate study. He is one of the better students in his 
classes and one of the better teachers among graduate students who are doing 
part-time teaching. 

OLMSTED, Charles H. , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,564 per year (maximum). B.A. Amherst College, 1943; M.A. Harvard University, 
1947, will receive Ph.D. from Harvard in June, 1959. Instructor in English at 
State University of Iowa, 1947-49; teaching fellow at Harvard, 1951-54; 
Instructor at Trinity College, 1957-59. Besides his teaching experience, he has 
had two years of administrative experience. 

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION 

CARPINO, Louis A., Assistant Professor "A" Chemistry at the rate of $129 per 
week. Payment should be as follows: Cottrell Grant, 6-8-59 to 6-24-59 - 2 
weeks, 3 days and NSF Grant 2368, 6-25-59 to 8-31-59 - 9 weeks, 3 days. 

PLAZA, Alphonse, Technical Assistant, Chemistry at the rate of $73 per week 
from June 8 to September 5, 1959 on ONR contract NONR 2151(00). 

STEIN, Richard S., Associate Professor "A" Chemistry at the rate of $161 per 
week from June 8- to September 5, 1959 on ONR contract NONR 2151(00). 



Attachment B, Page 3 
PROMOTION 

On September 9, 1959 Bronislaw M. Honigberg was promoted from Assistant Pro- 
fessor to Associate Professor, effective September 1, 1959 at salary of $6,708 
per year. As Mr. Honigberg has completed another year's service in the grade 
of Assistant Professor, he should be entitled to a salary of $6,981 on his 
promotion. 

UPGRADING 

PAGE, Richard H. , Director of Sports Publicity and Business Manager of 
Athletics from Grade 15 to 17, effective July 1, 1959 at $6,331 per year, 
payable from Athletic trust Funds. 

CHANGE TO FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

DENNIS, William D. , Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 
1959 at $4,316 per year. Approved for 3/4 time at July 1, 1958 meeting. 

LEA, Henry A., Instructor in German, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,564 per 
year. Originally on full-time basis but went on half-time basis for last 
semester in order to complete writing of his Ph.D. dissertation. 

SUMMER SAURY UNDER PUBLIC HEALTH GRANT 

GENTILE, Arthur C, for a ten-week period from June 7 to August 1 and August 16 
to 29, 1959, at $123 per week or a total of $1,230 under Public Health Grant, 
C-4052. 



EMERITUS 

LINDSEY, Adrian H. , Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics, Emeritus, 
effective September 25, 1959. 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step- rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of July and August, 1959. 



r~ 



Attachment B, Page 4 
ADDITIONS AND CHANGES RECOMMENDED FOR SUMMER SESSIONS PERSONNEL APP0ZS8MENTS, 1959 

Weekly 
% of Annual Rate to Gross 
Name Title King Rate be Paid Earnings 

Fink, Seymour Instructor, Music 50 $5,564 $ 69.55 $417.30 
Mr. Fink is an Associate Professor at Vassar College. This change from 
Instructor, Step 1, to Instructor, Step 7, will provide compensation more 
equivalent to his salary at Vassar. Employment will be July 27 to 
September 4, 1959. 

HAYDON, Randall Instructor, Business 50 5,356 66.95 401.70 
Mr. Haydon will teach Management 61 during the second main session, a 
course for which an Instructor had not previously been appointed. Re is 
a Non- University employee. Employment will be July 27 to September 4, 1959. 

PEPPARD, Murray B. Assoc. Prof., Russian 50 7,254 90.67 544.02 
Professor Peppard, a Non-University employee, will teach Russian 2, a 
course for which an Instructor had not previously been appointed. Employ* 
ment will be July 27 to September 4, 1959. 

RICCI, Benjamin, Jr. Assoc. Prof., Phys. 50 6,708 83.85 503.10 

Ed. 
Professor Ricci will be supervising the summer programs in the men's 
physical education plant. Employment will be July 20 to August 29, 1959. 

TOTMAN, Ruth J. Head of Dept. p # E.W. 50 9,464 118.30 709.80 
Professor Totman will be supervising the summer programs in the women's 
physical education plant. Employment will be July 20 to August 29, 1959. 

WEXLER, Sidney F. Assoc. Prof., Rom. Lg, 100 6,708 167.70 1,006.20 
Professor Wexler vill.be teaching French Graduate Reading as well as 
Spanish 1 for which he was previously approved. Professor Ferrigno, who 
had been approved for the French course, will not be available for employ- 
ment here this summer. The change involved is an increase in Professor 
Wexler's "% of Time" from "50" to "100". Employment will be June 22 to 
July 31, 1959. 

C0NL0N, John T. Asst. Prof., Bus. 50 6,474 80.92 485.52 
Professor Conlon will prepare the coming year's program for the School of 
Business' Freshman- Sophomore Advisory Committee and also will assist Dean 
Kirshen during the summer session. Employment will be July 27 to 
September 4, 1959. 



*v 



Attachment B, Page 5 



Additional compensation to certain mercbers of the Department of Romance 
Languages in connection with federally-supported Institute for Secondary 
School Teachers of French. Salaries are paid from Federal Funds and in 
all cases represent work beyond normal school year. Disbursement of the 
sums as described below has been approved by the fiscal authorities of 
the Office of Education (U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare) 
in advance of the signing of contract. 



JOHNSON, Robert B. , Associate Prof essor. Director of Institute. To 
receive 1/4 of annual compensation ($1,813.50) from June 7 to 
September 4, 1959. 

GODIKG, Stowell C, Head of Department. Assistant Director of Institute. 
To receive compensation for 6 weeks, based on annual salary ($1,134.00) 
from June 7, 1959. 

FERRIGNO, James, Professor. Director of Language Laboratory. To receive 
for preparation and for teaching an Institute course for which there is 
no release indicated the sum of $1,500 from June 7 to September 4, 1959. 

HULL, Alexander, Jr., Assistant Professor. To receive for preparation 
of materials, for extra duties during Institute program, for assistance 
to Director, the sum of $1,000 from June 7 to September 4, 1959. 

SMITH, Harold L. , Jr., Instructor. To receive for preparation of 
materials, for extra duties during Institute program, for extra in- 
dividual assistance to participants of Institute, the sum of $1,000 
from June 7 to September 4, 1959. 

LANDRO, Claire, Instructor. To receive as secretarial assistant 
(described as "secretary" in the budget) the sum of $30.00 per week, 
representing half-time employment from June 7 to August 5, 1959. 



I 



Attachment B, Page 6 

Additional personnel appointments recommended in connection with the summer programs 
of the University. 

Weekly 
% of Annual Rate to Gross 
Name Title Time Rate be Paid Earnings 

Chametzky, Jules Instructor, English 50 $5564 $ 69.55 $417.30 

Or. Chametzky will replace Assistant Professor Kaplan who has requested that he 
be released from his obligation to teach this summer. Period of employment will 
be June 22 to July 31, 1959. 

Rogers, Vincent R. Asst. Prof., Educa. 50 6474 80.92 485.52 

Professor Rogers will teach a section which has been added to the summer program 
in Education because of the large number of registrations. Period of employ- 
ment will be June 22 to July 31, 1959. 

Rogers, Vincent R. Asst. Prof., Educa. 100 6474 161.85 971.10 
Professor Rogers' period of employment for teaching in the second main session 
should be changed from "July 27 to September 4" to "August 4 through 
September 11, 1959 i: . 

The following recommendations are all in connection with the 1959 American 
Humanities Seminar to be conducted at the University in July. This is a special 
feature of the Summer Sessions program. 

Goldberg, Maxwell H. Head, Oept. English 100 9828 245.70 491.40 
Or. Goldberg will direct the Seminar, and speak at convocations. Period of 
employment will be July 6 to 17, 1959. 

Gozzi, Raymond D. Instructor, English 50 5564 69.55 417.30 

Mr. Gozzi will serve as coordinator for the Seminar. Period of employment will 
be June 22 to July 31, 1959. 

Madeira, Albert P. Instructor, English 

Mr. Madiera is to receive a stipend of $150 for handling the registration and 
arranging the scheduling of the Seminar. Stipend to be paid July 17, 1959. 

Zaitz, Anthony W. Asst. Prof., Speech 

Professor Zaitz is to receive a stipend of $150 for television and radio work 
in connection with the Seminar. Stipend to be paid July 17, 1959. 



Attachment B, Page 7 

APPOINTMENTS 

AULA, Bans! Lai, Assistant Professor "A", Home Economics, effective July 1, 
1959 at $5,889 per year. B.S. Benares Hindu University, 1954, M.S. Cornell 
University, 1955. He is completing work for Ph.D. degree. 

BUCKKANN, Ritchie J., Instructor "A 11 , Agricultural Engineering (% time), 
effective August 2, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S.A.E. Cornell University, 
1959. He has been admitted to the Graduate School of the University of 
Massachusetts. 

GREINER, Lee M. , Instructor "A", Agricultural Engineering (k time), effective 
July 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Connecticut, 1958; 
enrolled in Graduate School of University of Massachusetts beginning in the 
summer of 1958. Employed as a Research Fellow, Department of Agricultural 
Engineering July 1, 1958 through June 30, 1959. 

MYERS, Nancy A., Research Associate in Psychology (% time), effective 
June 1, 1959 to May 31, 1960 at $3,500 for the period, from NIMH grant M-2620. 
She was formerly employed as a part-time Instructor. Ph.D. University of 
Wisconsin. Her weekly salary will be $67.30. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

BLACKMORE, John, Head of Department "A", Agricultural Economics, effective 
September 27, 1959 at $10,985 per year (maximum). B.S. Washington State 
College, 1937; M.S. University of Maryland, 1938; M.P.A. Harvard University, 
1950; Ph.D. Harvard University, 1954. Junior Statistician, U.S. Bureau of 
the Census, 1938-39; Assistant Agricultural Economist, U.S. Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics, 1940-41; Agriculturist, Tennessee Valley Authority, 1942- 
43; Agricultural Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority, 1946-47; Chief, Agri- 
cultural Economics Branch, Tennessee Valley Authority, 1950-55; Land Use and 
Conservation Officer, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 
Rome, Italy, 1955 to present. 

RICE, William N. , Associate Professor "A", Entomology and Plant Pathology, 
effective July 19, 1959 at $7,436 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. 
Sioux Falls College, 1937; M.S. Iowa State College, 1939; Ph.D. Iowa State 
College, 1944. Employed full and part-time in Seed Laboratory, Iowa State 
College, 1937-45; in service of American Baptist Foreign Mission Society, 
mainly in Burma, doing teaching, extension and research in biology and agri- 
culture at three different schools, 1945-55; at State Agricultural Institute, 
Pyanmana, Burma, under a subsidy from the Ford Foundation, 1955 to present. 

ZUNIC, Matthew, Associate Professor "A", Physical Education, effective 
May 17, 1959 at $7,748 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. George 
Washington University, 1942; served four years in Navy's Physical Fitness 
Program; played professional basketball with Washington Capitols. Assistant 
basketball coach, George Washington, 1951 and 1952. Appointed head basket- 
ball coach at Boston University in September 1952 to date. 



Attachment B, Page 8 

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION 

ANNABLE, William P., Instructor "A 11 , Agricultural Engineering (8 weeks only), 
for the period July 5 through August 28, 1959, at the rate of $97.50 per 
week from Federal Funds. 

FELDMAN, Robert S. , to be paid $42.93 per day for the period June 8 through 
August 31, 1959 from Research Fund H-1061 (C3). The total amount earned 
during this period is not to exceed 2/9 of his annual salary or $1,860.44. 

HONIGBERG, Bronislaw M. , to be paid $220.00 per week for the period June 1 
through June 29, 1959 and August 17 through August 31, 1959 as Chief Research 
Investigator under Public Health Grant E-742 (C4). His weekly salary is com- 
posed of $60 - which is a continuation of his regular grant salary on an 
annual basis and $160 - which is at the rate of 2/9 of his annual salary. 

MANDEL, Manley, to be appointed Director, Summer Honors Research Program, for 
the period June 15 to July 25, 1959, at the rate of $115.55 per week - salary 
to be paid from the National Science Foundation, Grant Number NSF-G7964; also, 
for the period July 27 to September 5, 1959, at the rate of $115.56 per week - 
salary to be paid from the National Science Foundation per grant NSF-G871Q. 
This sum plus that provided from the above does not exceed 2/9 of his annual 
salary or a total of $1,386.66. 

M0NER, John G. as Summer Investigator, to be paid $166.66 per week for the 
period July 6 to August "22, 1959 and $166.71 per week for the period 
August 22 through August 29, 1959 from National Science Foundation Grant 
4021. His total pay for this period will be $1,333.33. 

MYERS, Jerome L. as Principal Investigator, to be paid $156.00 per week for 
the period June 8 through July 3, 1959 and July 20 through August 21, 1959 
from NIMH grant H-2620. His pay for this period will be $1,404.00, which is 
9/40 of his annual salary of $6,240. 

NUTTING, William B. as Chief Investigator - Zoology, to be paid $180.00 per 
week for the period June 8 through July 18, 1959 (full-time) and $60 per week 
for the period July 20 through August 29, 1959 (one-third time) from Public 
Health Grant E-562C5. His total pay for these periods will be $1,440.00. 

RAUCH, Harold as Summer Investigator, to be paid $172.00 per week for the 
period June 8 through July 10, 1959 and August 3 through August 29, 1959 on 
USPHS Grant G-5921. His pay for this period will be $1,548.00. 

ROBERTS, John L. as Summer Investigator, to be paid $121.33 per week for the 
period June 8 through September 5, 1959 (less period July 1 through July 18, 
1959) from U.S. Public Health Grant RG-6377. His total pay will be $1,334.63 

R0LLAS0N, H. Duncan as Summer Investigator, to be paid $185.00 per week for 
the period June 8 through August 8, 1959 from USPHS Grant H-2296C4. His total 
pay for this period will be $1,665.00. 

SNEDECOR, James G., to be appointed Research Director for Public Health Grant 
A-1266 (C2) for eight weeks from June 8 through July 31, 1959, at the rate of 
$232.50 per week - salary to be paid from Public Health Grant. The total 
amount will be $1,860 or 2/9 of his annual salary. 



Attachment B, Page 9 

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION (continued) 

TEICHNER, Warren H. as Principal Investigator, to be paid $181,35 per week for 
the period June 8 through 20, 1959 and August 3 through September 5, 1959 on 
Contract N61339-588. During the period June 22 to July 31, 1959, he will be 
employed half-time on the above contract and half-time teaching in the summer 
session at $90.67 per week. Contract employment not to exceed 9/40 of annual 
salary or $1,632.15. 



CBSB&9 Ps© Tjm, itosoci&te 3?xro£e®8©r of ?inasee, £o b© paid $134.25 per week from 
Federal Fuods, for wrk in asaesBbllng sttsourea data for ©zte&$J.®n projects, from 

July l, 1959 for @ight ^esk®«, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
August 4, 1959, 1:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT; Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, Cashin, 
Crowley, Haigis, Healey, Hoftyzer, 
Kiernan, McDermott, McNamara, Schuck, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather. 
Also, Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson and Lichterman, representing 
Governor Furcolo 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Presi- 
dent Mather called the meeting to order. On motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden as Chairman 
pro tem of the Board of Trustees. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
June 6, 1959 were approved as distributed. 

Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Finance Committee reported 

the Committee's action taken on June 30, 1959. Upon the Committee's 

recommendation and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the expenditures of the President from 
Unrestricted Income from Endowment Funds of 
$1,326.79 and from the University Fund of 
$2,437.07 through June 30, 1959 be approved. 

t 

It was 

VOTED : That the President spend in the year be- 
ginning July 1, 1959 for the furtherance 
of the University program such sums as in 
his discretion are necessary from the in- 
come on unrestricted Endowment Funds not 
to exceed $1,500, and such additional sums 
from unrestricted current gifts to the Uni- 
versity that are deposited in the Univer- 
sity Fund as may become available not to ex- 
ceed $2,500 for the period. 

On recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 



2097 



Boyden, 
Frank L. 



Endowment 
Funds - 
University 
Fund 



Endowment 
Funds 



University 
Fund 



2098 



Trust Fund 
Overhead 

AcCOUntrRUSTEE 



Staples, 
Emily M. 



Student 

Union 

Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the President's Annual Report and 
the graphic financial report of the 
Treasurer be printed from the Trust 
Fund Overhead Account in an amount not 
to exceed $3,200. 

On recommendation of the Finance Committee, it was 

VOTED : To accept the gift of the estate of Emily 
M. Staples and that the Treasurer be 
authorized to sell the real estate and 
personal property in the best way possible. 

Treasurer Johnson announced that after having inspected 
the physical properties of the Staples estate that the Trustees 
will not be able to realize the appraised valuation. The property 
is in a dilapidated condition not having been lived in for many 
years and not having had preventive maintenance. 

Chairman Brett announced that the Finance Committee had 
reviewed the securities of the University of Massachusetts Endowment 
Fund and the Committee has no recommendation for any change at this 



time. 



On recommendation of the Finance Committee, the Student 



Union Budget, as approved by the Finance Committee and on file in 
the Secretary's Office for the fiscal year starting July 1, 1959, 
was approved. 

Hokkaido University, Japan, is constructing a Student 
Union Building as a memorial to former University of Massachusetts 
President Clark. The late President's granddaughter and her 
husband, Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert Clark Myers, have donated a gift for 
Hokkaido University. On recommendation of the Finance Committee, 
it was 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell the 
Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert Clark Myers gift of 
50 shares of Pepsi-Cola United Bottlers 
stock and transmit the proceeds to 
Hokkaido University as per agreement 
associated with the gift. 

The Finance Committee recommended to the Board of Trustees 
that the President be authorized to require minor students who live 
and/or eat in fraternities or sororities to have written permission 
from their parents or guardians on a form prescribed by the Presi- 
dent and stating that non-payment of room and/or food charges will 
result in the student being refused registration for classes at the 
University. Students over twenty-one years of age will sign a form 
stating that the student agrees that non-payment of room and food 
charges of a fraternity or sorority may result in the student being 
refused registration for classes at the University. 

It was further recommended to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer be authorized to collect fraternity and sorority room 
and food charges provided that each fraternity or sorority executes 
ar agency agreement. The agreement is to be placed on file with 
the Treasurer. 

President Mather explained that reforms in fraternity 
practices are imperative. At one time he felt that if the Univer- 
sity could assist the fraternities in their financial administration 
by collecting room and food charges, the fraternity situation would 
be considerably improved. However, after talking with other state 
university presidents and attending a conference of the national 
officers of the national fraternities, and after discussing the 
matter with many interested persons, the President felt that the 
University should not get into the fiscal administrative problems 
of fraternities. 



2099 



Stock 

Mr. & Mrs. 
Gilbert Clark 
Myers 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 









/? 






t 



2 



TRUSTEE 



* 



0, 



, 



<\ 



.O 



.<b 



Alcoholic 
Beverages 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To table the recommendations of the 
Finance Committee pertaining to the 
administration of collecting fraternity 
or sorority charges. 

The President informed the Trustees that he is going to 

urge the faculty, under Article 12 of the Board of Trustees By-Laws 

which states "All important matters relating to the work of the 

University- -its research, instruction, and the welfare and 

discipline of the students, may be considered by the Faculty as a 

body" to consider the regulation that no alcoholic beverages may be 

consumed or stored on the campus or in any student housing off the 

campus. The regulation which will be recommended to be put into 

effect will be as follows: 

A. Undergraduate students regardless of age are not 
permitted the use of alcoholic beverages: 



1. 
2. 
3. 



At any University social function 
On University property 
In any housing which accommodates stu- 
dents in residence; i.e. those not 
living with parents or spouse 



B, 



All students regardless of age will be held 
responsible for appropriate conduct with 
reference to the use of alcoholic beverages. 

The President pointed out that the relationship between 

an individual and a university community is a voluntary one. In 

seeking the privilege of this relationship, an individual commits 

himself to meet the responsibilities that are concomitant with that 

privilege. Basic among these responsibilities is a continuing 

moral commitment to the unique set of policies, rules, regulations 

or laws that define the nature of that community. Since the 

association is a voluntary one, it is the clear responsibility of 



TRUSTEE 



2101 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the individual to determine for himself whether he can honor a 
commitment involved. If he cannot, as a moral person, he should not 
accept the privilege tendered. 

In discussing the 1960-61 budget, the President stated in 
arriving at budget figures an inflation adjustment, a student in- 
crease and a 5% improvement factor were taken into consideration. 
The budget is based on a 7,000 student enrollment. The President 
stated that a student body of 7,000 is dependent upon necessary 
capital outlay and an increase in faculty salaries. Capital outlay 
most needed is an addition to the Dining Commons which is necessary 
to feed the increased number of students. More dormitories would 



also be needed to house the students. If there is no salary increase, 
it will be impossible for the University to recruit an increased 
number of teachers with the necessary training and experience that 
the University must have to maintain the quality of instruction now 
being offered by the University. Thus, if there is no salary in- 
crease, there will be no further increase in student enrollment. 
On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the 1960-61 budget on file in 
the Secretary's Office. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment A and which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

Trustee Boyden, Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, reported the committee's action taken on August 

4, 1959. Upon the committee's recommendation and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 



Budget 



Personnel 
Actions 



2L02 



New 
Courses 



TRUSTEE 



Four 

College 

Cooperation 



School of 
Business 
Adminis t r at ion 



Title of 
"Chairman" 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED: To approve the new undergraduate courses, 
the course changes and the deletion of 
courses and the new graduate courses 
listed in Attachment B attached to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes . 

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Faculty and 

Program of Study, it was 

VOTED : To approve and accept the report of the 

committee to discuss four-college coopera- 
tion at the graduate level which is 
Attachment C to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

Upon recommendation of the President and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To establish the title of "Chairman" for 
the four Departments in the School of 
Business Administration. The following 
individuals are designated as Chairmen 
with extra compensation, as indicated, 
above their regular salary in their teach- 
ing rank for the extra duties and responsi- 
bilities as Department Chairmen during, but 
not limited to, the summer periods, vacation 
periods, overtime, and other non-academic 
periods of the year, as well as continuing 
duties throughout the year, to be paid from 
subsidiary account -03 with the provision 
that such extra compensation shall be paid 
in 52 weekly installments for only such 
duration of time as the individual con- 
tinues to serve as Department Chairman: 

ACCOUNTING *Assoc. Prof. John Anderson $1,050 

GENERAL BUSINESS & FINANCE *Assoc. Prof. James Ludtke 1,130 

MANAGEMENT *Asst. Prof. John Conlon 850 

MARKETING ^Professor Harold Hardy 1,040 
* These first appointments are for two years. 

As another step in reorganizing the administration of the 

University of Massachusetts and on recommendation of the President, 

it was 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That effective September 1, 1959 Federal 
Funds for the Experiment Station and the 
Extension Service be placed under a system 
of budgetary controls in the office of the 
University Treasurer similar to the system 
now in effect for state funds. This will 
include the preparation of annual budgets 
in detail for the use of both state and 
Federal funds (including all project 
budgets) by the Dean and Director for 
both the Experiment Station and the Ex- 
tension Service. These budgets will be 
submitted to the President for approval 
and by him to the Board of Trustees prior 
to being forwarded to the Federal Experi- 
ment Station and Extension Service authori- 
ties for their approval. When approved, 
these budgets will become the basis for 
the budgetary control established herewith. 
Any subsequent transfer of funds within 
budget categories must have the approval 
of the President. 

The General Electric Company at Pittsfield, recognizing 
the merit and the value of the undergraduate program which is 
being offered by the University of Massachusetts and in which 
General Electric employees obtain great benefit, has urged the ex- 
tension of the academic work through graduate programs. Upon 
recommendation of the President and upon motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to execute 
an amendment to the Trust for the Establish- 
ment of Certain Engineering Courses in 
Pittsfield, Mass., dated March 20, 1957 to 
broaden the scope of the agreement to include 
both graduate and undergraduate courses lead- 
ing to the appropriate Bachelors and Masters 
degrees offered by the University. 

And it was 

VOTED : That the fees for courses at the G. E.- 

Pittsfield Branch be established at $24.00 
per semester hour for undergraduate courses 
and $38.00 per semester hour for graduate 
courses and that an advanced payment fee of 
$25.00 be established for the graduate pro- 
gram. This fee will be credited to the course 
fee for students who attend but will be non- 
refundable if the student fails to attend. 



2103 



Federal Funds 
Budget for 
Experiment 
Station and 
Extension 
Service 



General 
Electric 



Course 
Fees 



2L04 



TRUSTEE 



Four College 
Cooperat ive 
Agreement 

Radio & TV 



Athletic 
Fields 



Lei and, 
Lars en, 
Bradley & 
Hibbard 
Contract 



Whitman & 
Howard 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

An an extension of four- col lege cooperation and upon 

recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to enter 
into a cooperative agreement with Amherst, 
Mt. Holyoke and Smith Colleges for 
participation in a cooperative project 
for educational FM radio and TV, and for 
the use of the University property for 
the location of the facilities. 

Upon recommendation of the Treasurer and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the contract for the new athletic 

fields with Eastern Tree and Landscaping 
Company be approved as completed in 
accordance with the plans and specifica- 
tions on June 22, 1959. 

Upon recommendation of the Treasurer and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer extend for the period 

July 1, 1959 to June 30, 1960, the present 
contract with Leland, Larsen, Bradley and 
Hibbard of Boston, for the architectural 
consulting service of Mr. Niels H. Larsen 
at a total payment for the period not to 
exceed $4,000 at the same hourly rates as 
therein provided with mileage allowance 
at 8£ per mile. 

Upon recommendation of the Treasurer and upon motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer extend the present con- 
tract with whitman and Howard, Inc. , of 
Boston, for consulting engineering services 
for the period of July 1, 1959 to June 30, 
1960, total payment for the period not to 
exceed $4,000 at the same hourly rates 
therein provided. 

President Mather announced the retirement of Dean Dale H. 

Sieling and announced the appointment of Fred P. Jeffrey as Acting 

Dean of Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station and 

Director of Extension Service. Upon recommennation of the President 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and upon motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To promote Fred P. Jeffrey so that he will 
receive the salary of Dean, College of 
Agriculture and Director of Experiment 
Station and Extension Service while he is 
Acting Dean, effective August 9, 1959. 

Because a new committee of the Board of Trustees, 

Committee on Athletics, has been established by the Board of 

Trustees and because new members of the Board have not been given 

committee assignments, the Board of Trustees directed the Chairman 

pro tern to make committee assignments for persons not yet assigned 

and to make assignments to the Committee on Athletics. 



The meeting adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 




Secretary 



2 i 05 



Jeffrey. 
Fred P. 



Trustee 
Committee on 
Athletics 



L06 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



™TTACHM&ty T 4 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
August 4, 1959 



APPOINTMENTS 



ANDERLE, Martin, Instructor in German, effective September 1, 1959 at $4,316 
per year, Ph.D. University of Vienna, 1956. During past two and a half 
years he was employed by two outstanding publishing houses in Austria as a 
reader and critic. 

BENJAMIN, Henry A., Teaching Associate in Zoology (1/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $1,438.67 per year. B.A. American International College, 
1959. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

BOUDET, Lucienne, Instructor in Romance Languages (Teaching Associate - % time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. Education in French colleges 
in Bordeaux ard received her higher education at the Ecole Normale 
Superieure de Fontenay-aux~Roses. Holds French equivalent of our Bachelor 
and Master's degrees. Taught in Langon, France, 1933-43; taught in Arcachon, 
France, 1945 to present. 

CAVALLARO, Sebastian, Instructor "A", Agricultural Economics (% time), 
effective July 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Massachusetts, 
1959. He has been admitted to our Graduate School* 

CUSHION,' George, Instructor in Geology (Teaching Associate -.% time), 
effective Septt&ber 4» 1959 at $1,079 per year. B»S* Brown University, 1957. 
He is currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

DAMON, David G., Instructor in Physical Education for Men (1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,577.33 per year. M.S. University of 
Massachusetts, 1955 and is currently enrolled in School of Education for 
his Master's degree. 

DAVIS, Frederic W. , Instructor "A", Forestry and Wildlife Management (% time), 
effective July 19, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Connecticut, 
1947. Naval Ordnance Laboratory, 1947-50; Bureau of Ordnance, 1950-54; Head 
of Washington Office of Corona, California Laboratories of Naval Ordnance, 
1954 to present. To be paid from U.S. Fish & Wildlife #14-16-008-583 (1350-21 
"Research with Federal Government 1 '). 

DUTCHER, Ray M. , Instructor in Bacteriology and Public Health, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,316 per year. B.S. Florida Southern College, 1949; 
M.S. University of Kentucky, 1957. Research Worker at Lederle Laboratories, 
1950-53; Bacteriologist for Kentucky Veterinary Medical Laboratory and Crown 
Crest Equine Laboratory, 1953-57; One-half time Instructor and Research 
Fellow on Public Health Service Grants, University of Massachusetts, 1957 to 
date. 

DOMINIANNI, Samuel J., Instructor in Chemistry <% time) (Teaching Associate) v 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. B.S. Queens College, 1958. 
Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 



V 2. 

APPOINT! EI1TS (continued) 

FISHAIIG, William J., Instructor "A", Entomology & Plant Pathology (% time), 
effective July 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. Hew Britain Teachers' College, 
1954. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. "**— 

GLEASON, Ray, Instructor "A ;t , Poultry (k time), effective July 1, 1959 at 
$2,535 per year. B.S. University of Vermont, 1954. Employed by Medlar Farms, 
Peterhoro, New Hampshire, 1954-58; presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

HANIFAN, Catherine E.y Instructor in Speech, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,316 per year. B.A, lit. Holvoke College, 1948; II. A. Northwestern University, 
1949. From 1954 to present, she has been a Speech and Hearing Therapist in 
the Springfield Public Schools; she has also held instructorships at Smith 
College, The College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, Minnesota; and Trinity College, 
Washington, D. C. 

HOYLE, Merrill C. , Instructor "A 11 , Forestry and Wildlife Management (\ time), 
effective July 1, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Massachusetts, 
1959. Has been admitted to our Graduate School. 

LLOYD, Orville B., Instructor in Geology (Teaching Associate - \ time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,079 per year. B.A. University of Connecticut, 
1957. Has been in military service ever since. 

SALAKO, Albert A., Teaching Associate in Zoology (1/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $1,438.67 per year. B.A. Mount Union College, 1956; M.S. 
University of Illinois, 1958. From 1958 to present, he has been a Research 
Assistant at University of Illinois. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

SCAIILOK, Patricia, Instructor in Chemistry (% time) (Teaching Associate) , 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. B.A. Our Lady of the Elms 
College, 1952. Has been employed in industry. Currently enrolled in our 
Graduate School. 

SCHAPIRO, Janice, Instructor in Chemistry (% time) (Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. B.S. Queer* College, 1958* 
Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

SILVEIRA, Augustine, Instructor in Chemistry (% time) (Teaching Associate), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. B.S. New Bedford Institute, 
1957. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

STEWART, Anne ti. , Teaching Associate in Zoology (% time), effective September 1, 
1959 at $2,158 per year. B.S. Simmons College, 1958. Currently enrolled in 
our Graduate School and will be a replacement for John L. Roberts who is on 
sabbatical leave for academic year, 1959-60. 



3. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

■ ■■■m m * i m ttmm m- mtm mt \t\ n tt WW M —t »— t—— I Ill i 

AKGELL, Clarence S. , Instructor in Speech, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,356 per year (5 steps above minimum). A.B. and II. A. University of Illinois, 
1939 and 1941; all requirements for Ph.D. are complete except the dissertation. 
Taught public speaking and speech correction at University of Illinois, 1939- 
48; taught public speaking at Cornell University, 1948-53; taught public speak- 
ing and coached debate teams at Princeton University, 1953 to date. 

BAID, Henretta T. , Instructor in Zoology, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,564 per year (maximum). B.S. William and iiary College, 1954; Ph.D. Univer- 
sity of California, January 1959. From spring of 1959 to present, she was a 
departmental fellow in Biology Department at Amherst College. 

BEECH, George T. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Michigan State College, 1954; 
from September 1955 to present, he has been a graduate student at Johns 
Hopkins University and expects Ph.D. degree in October, 1959. Spent 1954*55 
at University of Freiburg, Germany on Fulbright scholarship and 1958-59 at 
Poitiers, France on a fellowship from Johns Hopkins University. He was a 
Junior Instructor in History at Johns Hopkins from 1956*58. 

BERGQUIST, Richard E. , Instructor in Physical Education for Men, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. University 
of Uassachusetts, 1957; M.S. University of liaryland, 1958. He has been em- 
ployed as Director of Physical Education at Central School, Hudson Falls, W.Y, 

CHANDLER, John A. , Assistant Professor of Chemistry, effective September 1, 
1959 at $5,772 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. Ohio University, 1955; 
M.S. University of Illinois, 1958. Laboratory Assistant for one year at Ohio 
University and a Teaching Assistant for two years at University of Illinois. 
Has also had three months of industrial experience in Research Laboratories 
of Head Paper Company during summer of 1955* Expects to receive Ph.D. degree 
from University of Illinois in 1959. 

DORFMAN, Gertrude R. , Professor of French, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$8,684 per year (maximum). She will teach the special class in French X at 
The Amherst Regional High School, the Civilization course on campus, and a 
portion of the Problems Course. She has been released from her duties at the 
Cleveland Public School System in order to teach in this Institute for 
Secondary School Teachers of French and will be paid from that fund. 

DUCKERT, Audrey R. , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,148 per year (4 steps above minimum), B*S, and M.A, University of 
Wisconsin, 1948 and 1949; Ph.D. Radcliffe College, 1959. Research Assistant, 
University of Wisconsin, 1948-52; Editor, University of Wisconsin course 
announcements and bulletins, 1952; Editorial Assistant, G. and C. Merriam 
Company, Springfield, Mass., 1953-56; Assistant in Harvard Extension course 
English for Foreign Students, 1958; Teaching Fellow, Harvard University, 1958- 
59. 



4. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINlliUM fcont iltticd) 

DUNN, Albert H., Assistant Professor "A", Agricultural Economics (Retail 
Marketing Specialist), effective July 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year (4 steps above 
minimum). B.S. Oberlin College, 1916. Served as Navy Lieutenant, J.G. in 
World War X; Western Manager, A. I. Root Co., Council Bluffs, Iowa, 1919-26; 
Advertising Salesman, Saturday Evening Post , Detroit, Michigan, 1926-31; with 
Progressive Grocer, 1931-51; with American Family Magazine, 1951-54; with 
Western Family Magazine, 1954 to date. To be paid from Retail Mktg. Education 
Contract #12-05-300-12. 

EBERSOLE, Alva V., Jr., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $5,772 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. and M.A, 
Mexico City College, 1949 and 1951; Ph.D. University of Kansas, 1957. In- 
structor, Pacific School of Languages, 1951-52; Instructor, University of 
Kansas, 1952-57; Instructor, University of Illinois, 1957 to present. Has 
studied and traveled extensively in Spain, Mexico and in nine of the Latin 
American Republics. Editor of HISPANOFILA, a scholarly journal to be edited 
in Amherst but printed in Spain. 

ESHBACH, Charles E. , Professor "A", Agricultural Economics, effective August 9, 
1959 at $9,823 per year (maximum). B.S. University of Massachusetts, 1937; 
M.P.A. Harvard University, 1959. He was magazine editor for the Wells Publish- 
ing Company, 1938-40; Director and Information Specialist of New England Radio 
News Service, 1938-49 with time out for service in U.S. Army; Director and 
Marketing Information Specialist for Extension Service, 1949 to date. 

FARSAKH, Yusif S. , Instructor in Mathematics, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,524 per year (1 step above minimum). B.S. American International College, 
1957; M.S. University of Massachusetts, 1959. Has been a Teaching Fellow at 
the University from 1957 to 1959. 

GLATZ, Frederick J., Assistant Athletic Coach, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,538 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. University of Pittsburgh. He 
then joined the National Professional Football League with Pittsburgh Steelers. 
Entered Armed Services in 1956. Served on football coaching staff, University 
of Pittsburgh in 1958. 

HARLOW, Dana E. , Instructor in Recreation, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. University of West Virginia, 
1952; M.S. University of Illinois, 1955; Ph.D. University of Geneva, 1957. He 
has held positions on leadership, supervisory, and administrative levels in 
Industrial, Hospital, Voluntary Agency, and Armed Forces Recreation, as well as 
directing a camp for diabetic children; he was a member of University of Geneva 
social survey research team to Middle Eastern Countries; he has served with 
United Nations as a UNESCO observer to Brussels Exposition and as Administration 
Assistant at GATT Conference at Geneva. 

HAYES, Ernest L. , Instructor "A", Agricultural Economics (Marketing Specialist), 
effective August 9, 1959 at $6,240 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.S. 
University of Massachusetts, 1931. Agricultural Adjustment Admin., Plymouth 
County - Fieldman and Supervisor, 1937-45; Statistician, Division of Census, Dept. 
of Commerce, Washington, D.C. , 1945-49; Operated gift shop, 1949-51; Sales 
Agent and Investigator for Manning City Directory, 1951-57; Research Instructor, 
University of Massachusetts, 1957-59. 



5. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

JONES, Horace M. , Professor "A", 4-K (Rural Youth Leadership) for the period 
July 5 through Novenker 7, 1959 at $9,828 per year (maximum) - payable under 
ICA C-1129. He is to be the Technical Leader for this special short course 
conducted by ICA in Washington, D. C, B.S. South Dakota State College. 

LAUTER, Paul, Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,564 per 
year (maximum). B.A. New York University, 1943; M.A. Indiana University, 1953; 
Ph.D. Yale University, 1958. Teaching Associate, Indiana University, 1952-53; 
Reader at Yale, 1956-57; Instructor, Dartmouth, 1957 to present. 

LAVALLEE, Lorraine D. , Instructor in Mathematics, effective September 1, 1959 
at $5,564 per year (maximum). B.A. Mt. Holyoke, 1953; M.A. University of 
Massachusetts, 1955. Half-time Teaching Fellow at Univ. of Mass., 1953-55. 

MILLER, Reuben G. , Instructor in Economics, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,564 per year (maximum). B.A. LaSalle College, 1952; M.A. Montana State 
University, 1956; all requirements completed for Ph.D. from Ohio State Uni- 
versity with exception of dissertation. Graduate Assistant, Montana State 
University, 1952-53; Assistant Instructor, Ohio State University, 1954-57; 
acting Assistant Professor, Oberlin College, 1957-58. 

PIPPERT, Ralph R. , Assistant Professor of Education, effective September 1, 
1959 at $6,474 per year (maximum). B.S. Mission House College, 1944; M.S. 
University of Wisconsin, 1950; expects Ph.D. in August 1959. Teacher of 
English, Howards Grove High School, Wisconsin, 2 years; Teacher of English and 
Guidance, Random Lake High School, Wisconsin, 5 years; Guidance Director, 
Watertown Schools, Wisconsin, 3 years; Director of Personnel, Mission House 
College, Wisconsin, 1 year; Supervisor Teacher Training, Lakeland College, 
Wisconsin, 2 years; Head, Dept. of Education, Lakeland College, 1 year. 

PUTNAM, Peter, Assistant Professor of Physics, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. Princeton, 1948, 
1957, 1959. He was engaged in industrial work from 1952-55; Research Assistant 
in Physics Department, Princeton University, 1955-56; Laboratory Instructor 
in Physics, Princeton University, 1956-58. 

STEKGLE, Thomas R. , Instructor in Chemistry, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,356 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.S. Franklin and Marshall College, 
1951; M.S. University of Michigan, 1953; expects Ph.D. this year. National 
Science Foundation Fellow, 1952-53. 

TEALL, John L. , Instructor in History (Visiting Lecturer), effective 
September I, 1959 at $1,354.66 per year (maximum) (1/3 time). Ph.D. Yale Uni- 
versity and is at present Assistant Professor of History at Mt. Holyoke College. 
Taught here on part-time basis, 1957-58. 

TUNIS, William D. , Associate Professor "A", Entomology and Plant Pathology, 
effective October 1, 1959 at $8,372 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.S. 
University of Massachusetts, 1949; M.S. University of Minnesota, 1951; expects 
Ph.D. from University of Massachusetts in September 1959. Assistant in 
Entomology at University of Minnesota, 1949-51; Extension Entomologist, Univer- 
sity of Connecticut, 1952 to date. 



I 



6. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

WATTS, Harold W. , Assistant Director - Student Union, effective July 26, 1959 
at $6,162 per year (1 step above minimum). B.S. and M.Ed. Springfield College. 
General Secretary, YMCA; Director of U.S.O. in Trinidad during war and for 
past ten years has been Director of Westhampton Community Center. 

WEBSTER, Lindsley E. , Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Lehigh University, 1953; M.A, 
Clark University, 1955; is nearing completion of dissertation for Ph.D. degree. 
Graduate student at Cornell University from 1954-59. 

ELKINS, Arthur, Instructor in Accounting, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.B.A. University of Massachusetts, 
1957; M.S. Columbia University, 1953. Presently employed by United Utilities 
and Specialties Company in Boston. 

REINSTATEMENT 

CHENG, Pao Lun, Associate Professor of Finance, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$6,981 per year. He has been on leave of absence since March 9, 1959. 

MYERS, Nancy A., Visiting Lecturer in Psychology (% time), effective September 
1, 1959 at $1,287 per year. Dr. Myers will teach one course in child 
psychology each semester. 

REINSTATEMENT REAPPOINTMENT 

B0IC0URT, Mrs. Ruth C. , Instructor in Home Economics (% time for first 
semester 1959-60), effective September 1, 1959 at $2,262 per year. She has 
served in this capacity three previous semesters. 

REAPPOINTMENT 

MARTINEAU, Theodore A., Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds. 

CHANGE TO FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

C0URH0YER, George R. , Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,316 per year. Approved for % time at April 21 meeting. 

HULL, Anne, Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,316 per year. Has been on h time basis since January 25, 1959. 

STOCKTON, Doris S. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
1959 at $5,538 per year. She has been on % time basis since 1956. 

REAPPOINTMENT AND CHANGE TO TWO-THIRDS EMPLOYMENT 

COHEN, Jean C. , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology (2/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $3,570.32 per year. Was previously on 1/3 time. This 
appointment is for first semester of 1959-60 year. 



7. 

CHANSE TO OKE-KALF TIME EMPLOYMEtffl 

DiMINNO, Rosemarie, Teaching Associate in Zoology, effective September 1, 
1959 at $2,153 per year. Has been on 1/3 time basis since January 27, 1958* 

TRANSFER OF APPOINTMENT 

FULLER, Gordon W. , Instructor ; 'A", Food Technology (% time), effective 
July 19, 1959 at $2,535 per year, to be paid from Glass Containers 
Manufacturers Institute Trust Fund instead of University funds. 

CHANBB II! TITLE 

At the June 6, 1959 meeting, CHEKG, Pao Lun was approved as an Associate 
Professor at $134.25 per week. The title should have been Assistant Professor 
"A" at the same salary. 

MENTAL HEALTH TRAINING GRANT - 2H-6244-C3 

RIGGS, Margaret U, , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, for second semester, 
1958-59 at $550.00. She helped in the graduate clinical training program 
and was paid from the same fund for the first semester, 1958-59. 

POPULATION COUNCIL. INC . 

DRIVER, Edwin D. , Assistant Professor of Sociology at $124.50 per week for 
eight weeks, June 14 to August 8, 1959, as compensation for services rendered 
in analyzing data for the study of -Differential Fertility in Central India.' 9 
Total not to exceed $996.00. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

KAX7AI, Hiromichi, Assistant Professor "A", 3/4 time, $84.93 per week, July 15 « 
August 31, 1959 on NSF Grant G5243. (Formerly employed under U.S. Navy Re- 
search Contract N0NR 2151 (00)* 

SCHUSTER, Rudolf, Associate Professor of Botany, to be paid 2/9 of his annual 
salary ($7,235) or 8 weeks at $200.97 or $1,607.76 from NSF G7114 for the 
periods June 15 - July 11 and August 3-29, 1959. 

TRAVER, Jay R, Associate Professor of Zoology, to be changed from 1/4 to 1/2 
time with an increase of $455, to be paid from NSF G6698 for the period 
June 29 - August 15, 1959. 

INSTITUTE FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS OF FRENCH 

m i ,.•-■■«....- ii i i i ii i i » i «i i ,i 

LANDRO, Claire, Instructor. To receive as secretarial assistant (described 
as "secretary" in the budget) the sum of $30.00 per week be extended from 
August 5 (as originally approved) to September 5, 1959. 



8. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEAL TH 

EPSTEIN, Seymour, Associate Professor of Psychology. To receive 9/40 of his 
current salary of $6,435 or $1,447.83 under NIMH Grant 1*1293 (C2) from June 22 
to August 21, 1959. His weekly rate will be $160.87. 
t 

NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT NONR-2242(00) 

SMITH, H.T.U. , as Principal Investigator. To receive $450.00 during the period 
June 9 to July 9, 1959. 

ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION 

JOA, Hans, Weather Observer at $1,25 per day, July 1, 1959 to June 30, 1960, 
not to exceed $457.00 (twice daily readings). 

JOA, Hans, Weather Observer at $1.25 per hour, July 1, 1959 to June 30, 1960, 
not to exceed 832 hours. (Prepare weather records and reports.) 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the month of September, 1959. 

SUMMER SESSION EMPLOYMENT 

WW liw— — M iwii wwiw— i ii^iw i m i ti. ii 

9 

MacCONNELL, William, Associate Professor of Forestry, to teach Forestry 78, 
Harvesting Forest Products, from June 29 through July 17, 1959. He is teach- 
ing full-time and should receive $167.70 per week. 

STAWIECKI, Edmund J., Instructor in German, be employed to teach German 28 
(Scientific German) during the second main term of the Summer Session from 
July 27 through September 4, 1959. His salary is $69.55 per week, based on 
a half-time teaching load. 

CHANGES IN SUMMER SESSION EMPLOYMENT 

On May 19, 1959 the Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Robert G. 
Tucker, Instructor, Dept. of English, to teach a half -load in second main 
summer session (July 27 -September 4), It is requested that K0EHLER, G. Stanley, 
Associate Professor of English, replace Mr. Tucker to teach a 50% load during 
the period July 27-September 4 at a weekly salary of $90.67. 

On May 19, 1959 the Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Peter Heller, 
Associate Professor of German, to teach a half-time load during the second 
main summer term (July 27-September 4). It is requested that Dr. HELLER be 
employed during the same period of time on a full-time basis at a salary of 
$188.16 pec week. 



9. 

CHANGES III SUMMER SESSION EliPLOYHEMT (continued) 

It is requested that LEWIT, David W. , Instructor in Psychology replace 
Robert S. Feldman to teach in the first main summer term (June 22- July 31) 
on a half-time basis at a salary of $61.75 per week. The Board of Trustees 
had previously approved the appointment of Dr. Feldman at the Kay 19 meeting. 

On Hay 19, 1959 the Board of Trustees approved the appointment of Robert 
McCARTNEY to teach full-time in the Department of Economics during the 
second main summer se««ion £July 27-September 4). His name is corrected 
to reau <£UE£th instead of Robert: McCartney. 

It is recommended that JOA, Hans be employed to teach a half-time load in 
the Department of German during the second main summer session (July 27- 
September 4), at a salary of $61.75 per week. Mr. Joa will teach a course 
in Russian and replaces Hurray B. Peppard who was previously approved by 
the Board of Trustees on June 6, 1959. 

pIDHANN, George P. , Associate Professor of Engineering, was approved by 

the Board of Trustees at the May 19, 1959 meeting to teacK in the Summer 

Session during the period June 22-July 31, 1959 at a weekly salary of $104.81, 

His appointment should be canceled. The course he was going to teach was not 
offered. 



Weekly 
Annual Rate Gross 



OBERLANDER, George J., Instructor, Chemistry 62.5 5,564 $86.93 $521.58 
Should be August 3-September 11, 1959. 
Approved as August 4-September 11, 1959. 

ROGERS, Vincent R. , Asst, Prof., Education 100 6,474 161.05 971.10 
Should be August 3-September 11, 1959. 
Approved as August 4- September 11 $ 1959. 



10. 
RECLASSIFICATION - Upgrading 

ZAK, John i . , from Assistant Professor of Agronouy (academic year) to 
Assistant Professor "A", Agronomy, effective September 1, 1959 at $7,527 
per year. 

PROMOTIONS 

AZPE1TIA, Alfonso G., from Assistant Professor of iathematics to Associate 
Professor of Mthematics, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,708 per year. 

IARTLETT, Lawrence h. , from Associate Professor of Zoology to Professor of 
Zoology, effective September 1, 1959 at $8,060 per year. 

CALNEK, Brace W. , from Assistant Profeseor "A", Veterinary Science to 
Associate Professor "A", Veterinary Science, effective September 1, 1959 
at $8,060 per year. 

CIlAiSTZKV, Jules, from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor of 
English, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,006 per year. 

DRIVER, Edwin D. , from Assistant Professor of Sociology to Associate 
Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

HELLER, Peter, from Associate Professor of German to Professor of German, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $8,060 per year. 

HGGAN, Mrs. Floriana T. , from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor 
of English, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,006 per year. 

HUBBARD, E. Vickery, from Assistant Professor of Physical Education for 
Women to Associate Professor of Physical Education for Women, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $6,708 per year. 

KAPLAN, Sidney, from Assistant Professor of English to Associate Professor 
of English, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

K0SAK0WSKI, Stephen R. , from Assistant Professor of Physical Education to 
Athletic Coach, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

LEWIT, David, Instructor in Psychology to Assistant Professor <f Psychology, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $5,538 per year. 

Hcl-iANAMY, Mary Elizabeth, from Instructor in Education to Assistant Professor 
of Education, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,772 per year. 

iXTCHELLj John H. , from Assistant Professor of English to Associate 
Professor of English, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

NORTON, John S., from Assistant Professor "A", Agricultural Engineering to 
Associate Professor "A", Agricultural Engineering, effective September 1, 
1959 at $8,060 per year. 



11. 

MORTON, Paul, from Associate Professor of Art to Professor of Art, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $8,060 per year. 

OBERLAiDER, George, from Instructor in Chemistry to Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,006 per year. 

PIRA, Edward S., from Instructor "A", Agricultural Engineering to Assistant 
Professor "A", Agricultural Engineering, effective January 31, 1960 at 
$6,981 per year. 

REID, Georgia G. , from Instructor in Physical Education for Women to 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women, effective September 1, 
1959 at $5,538 per year. 

SCKOEFFLER, Sidney, from Associate Professor of Economics (% time) to 
Professor of Economics (% time), effective September 1, 1959 at $3,627 
per year. 

SKILLIKGS, E. Hills, from Instructor to Assistant Professor "A", effective 
September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

SMITH, Harold L, , Jr. , from Instructor in Romance Languages to Assistant 
Professor of Romance Languages (3/4 time), effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,153.50 per year. 

STEIN, Richard S. , from Associate Professor of Chemistry to Professor of 
Chemistry, effective September 1, 1959 at $8,060 per year. 

SWENSON, Paul A., from Assistant Professor of Zoology to Associate Professor 
of Zoology, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,708 per year. 

TROLL, Joseph, from Instructor "A", Agronomy to Assistant Professor :} A", 
Agronomy, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,708 per year. 

van STEENBERG, John, from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of 
History, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,006 per year. 

WALLACE, Esther M. , from Instructor in Physical Education for Women to 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women, effective September 1, 
1959 at $6,006 per year. 

WILKINSON, Thomas 0. , from Assistant Professor of Sociology to Associate 
Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, 1959 at $6,981 per year. 

YABL0MSKV, Lewie, from Assistant Professor of Sociology to Associate Pro* 
feasor of Sociology, effective September 1, 1959 at $7,527 per year. 



12. 

APPOINTMENTS FOR G. E. PROGRAM, PITTSFIELD 

* BARRON, Leon 0. , Assistant Professor of English, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $809.25. 

** BARRON, Leone A., Instructor in English, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $823.36. 

* HIGGINS, George R. , Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, first 
semester of academic year 1959-60 at $721.50. 

#' Leahy, John, Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $591.51. 

* LITTLEJOHN, Lyance G. , Jr., Instructor in Physics, first semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $591.51. 

** HcQuade, James M. , Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $539.49. 

* HORN, John W. , Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, first semester 
of academic year 1959-60 at $1,254.60. 

* PHINNEY, Arthur B. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, first semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $884.00. 

* PRUYNE, Granville S. , Instructor in Chemistry, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $591.51. 

* SAVEREID, S. Jay, Assistant Professor of Speech, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $481.00 



* University of Massachusetts staff member 

# Previously employed on same program 
** New to program • 



Jl-j* 



summer mmmmm 

Jii»ri wir a..*£h«U4Mfc\ta» AxrUMMttmw •^■wml^tw 



% of Tiffie Eatc to b<i Paid 



$4*316 ;$53..95 



" ,:. Gsrocofcfc trill fce^cfe ®n& -section of Esglisfe 2, €Sesg&DSi£ioa. 

of ©Bployzeafc is from Jaly feg £o Septar.be s 4, 1959* 
* Eoa-UiiivGvaity esq 



Gross . 
123.70 



His period 



G«A 



s ih sssmr. SEssiea EKPKmssssp 



&&ES36&XUS.,. Jtolm E. , Associate IK 

by fefee: Boasdi of Xtaseees «fc ihe l&gr 
Silases' S@®si©a cfostag &^ jerlod 
of #3.60*8? „ Hie efpoftafESSEadE s%@«ld 
130©- fee saeedtec! 4bg to sosli 



ssoc-o£ Epgimeesisg* s*as sp^to^ed 
19, 1959.i3ectl^ to fceacfe in ttee 
tsfc .3 * 21 y 1959 at: a t&e&ly s, 
be caaee-ilQ& His sessfices ssiil 



tffiTACHM&NT B 



KEH UHDBSGBADU&IK COURSES 
COUBSE CE&MS 
vm&Tim OF COURSES 



E&& Uadar«gadaate Coa?se« 

ii m iii u iMw (■■■ i n i rMiw i nni i nir r ni i -f~- i i'nr "wn nti' T' i — i r • urn 

Accxnasfcia* % - Theory of Accoaata. The development of Aceeaatiag 
PriacipXes or Standards followed fey &a intensive etedy-o£ the coatro« 

versi&X aspects of iacotse dte&esnica&ion and the presentation of a fir® 8 © 

financial position. 

3 class hossrs Credit 3 

Aftrieoltisral gB^ineeriga 53 - Feosf Service Facilities Planning. Space 

OKgaalssasien aad eqaipoeat layeiits^ decisions an<& plaasalag relative to 
facilities, utilities &ai ssfiarials hanollag. 

2 ©lass hears; 1 2-honr laboratory Credit 3 

Agggawgg^ftg; -CI) Weed Control. Heed infestation, eessros meets 3 ideati££« 
and principles of cOTtrol* Special ^s^hasis ©a the ch«snical control 



3 

Prerequisites Chesaistry 1, 2 ami Sotany 1 



ge&ance JLi * Milk Seeretien (I). Lactation ia all Its «pectg 9 in- 
cluding the gross- aad aicrescepie aaatctay of the saaoaaey slned in its de~ 
velopmat fe® birth through active secret ion and isawluciOBt, the endocrine 
®f milk secretion, and practical applicaticns la managing toe 



1 el&es hear; 1 2«hear lahorsr&ory period. CJredit 2 

Science 91 CI}. 92 CII) - Special Peahleios 



■ w m ■ 'j tt fi mi» i jjj m imaww owren— rwnf »wi 



Proble© tsork aaissr the sapesvioioa of a staff member 9 iataaied to iatro» 
dag© qualified Seniors to research setheds ia s«© phase of aaisial scieaee s 
such @$ Batritisn, genetics, r^rosfeetioa^ ©eats or histology. 

Csedit 1-3 

^g&ggicalttgg® . 51 CI.) - Principles of Arhoriceltaxe. nev*lepiBea& of 

SM»iei!*si £®d ^ri^ata shads tzee programs, Geseml n&ii&e&aace of shad& 
aad ©rasa^atal trees eoveriqe fcsraaspleafciag, prnniag, fertilising,, ase of 
pes&icidas, bcac&gg aad eablitqg, and the aae of <festm%le tree species, 

St&dent Xasarance Policy eostis^, $!H»0® per year is m&daftosy, 

2 elflsa hears; 1 2»h©t&r lalK*r$t©ry Credit 3 

&|§^jy| - Basic teiga {eontimssatioiss of Art 31) ia introduction to the 
etassssts aad principles of t^o ^ai ^iree*di&BE!&s.iioa3l design aad their 
teS&Eati^ie applicatioato visaal aieseatatioa« €olor thaory aad ass. 
§ ©t&Sio hoars Credit 3 

•t 31 



^^«IZa«.M ~ PriBgatakiago A hasie sfiaify of the aasiter&sla» teehaiqBes issd 
aes&hs£ie eoasideratloas p&saHasc to the gri^hie sedio of lithography ®»d 



stada^t to create aad print his eon ssor&a 

6 stadia Isoars Cs®dit 3 

P^er^atislJje; Afft 31 a®d 32> or pemissi©a of iastraator. 



-2- 



•Are 79 - Moderns Paintisg asd Seal; 
saeots las arfc s and an analysis of the 

as they raH&te to society* 

3 el38-S house 



¥he origin of the csedern aova~ 
c&eteaporary testmi^as and styles 

Credit 3 



&r£ SI - Kodera arcbiteatnEe-g A 

a&ra&eea* aad aes&feetie principles 
tesh&ic&i in aetata * 



history of the eta^e in atyla* technical 

past z&& Si 



Credit 3 



Bacteriology §6 - Virology* Th© natase and p 
ptosfc &d baet&rial visesea* 
Z elass hears; I 3 •hoar laboratory 
Prerequisite: pen&issien of iastmetor 



BielgKy 1 a»d 2* Xatroeae&lof. to I 

l*&a*sts end organisms la terns of their ©s%ia 
€s>a«li£ is. sot given without cesgplffi! 
«&o 



©3 Of 

essacft 




xaa sequence. 
I nay not take 



B &08KSS 1 2-1 



tresia&e&ft of the basic t 



I&&redae&ie& to E 

©f 



Layer tteory, 
lass isosrs 
Psesefoisite: t&gtha&atics 



Security Aaalyf 




trial grasp 



factors acrec 
heir anaiys 
intensive itt- 



21 - Canaan Ii.t 

ill 

oe4 the Baroque, 
3 elan© hears 
PaES«equisite: Gensaa 15 eod 2& or CM&aivaleat 




of Enlighs&isasgs* A survey of 
rs&are* f@@»ifsg ©b tha SSiddle %« s the Ref@»&« 
essitfeg vdth the rise ©f Ka 




t sise© 1770. 4 eentisBatian ef to^ma 7? 9 
ssy sKW&ssiits f ram fete Ift&igh&eaaeitfc to the 



6 or equivalent 



G&mmmm& 64. * Tte La& and Praetlee of Civil Llberr-les. 4 st«4y of 
dawelefssBjal: in Atasriesn Genstltutieiffii Lav ©f the c&ses$»& of eivil 

in&iuiJj^ the £ellei7lag fields: ?ree speech and religion, fair trial, 

sees ^iisarimissatiois. She fsm&tta© of wurts la pretacsioe e£ thase 



Credit 3 



3 



<''^Bfc»*is' x> 



~3- 



Htsfcory 1 94 (X and XI) - Seatoar in Asssriean History. A problem course 
intended to give training in historical research m4. ssritiEsg, with 
special sttes^ ion to the use o£ scarce materials « Tae field of study 
will vary frcui semester to semester, depsadins ap*»a &&©. instructor. In- 
tended primarily for History majors but open to others by nernissiea. 
Rasaaally limited to 12-15 students. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite; History 25s, 26 

History 95 (I and II) - Seminar in European History. Similar to History 94 
feat dealing siith fields of European aistory. 

3 class hmzm Credit 3 

iz History 5, © 



©f 
©f 

3 



«*&5tei Relations II. k stud> of the hxmm rela- 
ia th& Begat iat£o& m& administration of 

dealt 3 

6? or eesaaae of instnscs®^ 

5 - Credits aad Coltafclaas. lAte principles end practices ©£ 

maB%<&»&iafc laaludia& the aaarcas and analysis 
iniomatioxi, celiecsioa eaeeedasee and ea^sfo! afiA the rigfets. 



Credit 3 




M9Slfllj SK_M - Arabians ia Advesfelsiag. Se esplieeeieii c€ basic siartet- 

1&S te^l@%e la plaaaiae; sb# ^usalysisg advertising c®sg*Ms» Other 
8%s*£fices£ preblesaa suefe as Ksseereh a^repriAtlesa, the detarBinatiaa ©S 

the sds?ertislng budget, the ctate ©£ fltedia ass* the amb^a^^aat ®eaauressRat 
of their effect lveaeea, feh© prepeeftfciea of cssf&y ®e§ Iay®at will fee considered,, 
Fsexefeiaite: Hartetia& S3 aiad ?3« Credit 3 



ffatacsia&to 5# (II) - Synthetic Projective ^eerotry. to asiaaatie study 



( 



3 class hoars 



issig^ syasfefeetic ..asettofe ©ad mot restrictad £® the plane) of 
prapartiea lnvarias& aaaav pxojectiea. 

Oredit 3 
s HathaBiatiaa 4 



M^tssgaatics 5S - 



Xatroducfeiogi to Blgltal Gaapvters. She basic digital 

iatroaaatfe® t© Bealea& Algebra, logical eaalge of 

, codiss^, utility programs, criteria far evaluation 
of eespetera. 

3 class hear© Credit 3 

Pnmajaiaite: m&komziMB 30 or gxexoisaica of lascxac&o? 

Slathaaaticg e® Cxi) - factor Space®. The analytic ©esBssstrj of n-dinemional 
in factor iamalatteis vidfe special reference eo eaaaacfeariatia value®, 

5 brief awe 

Credit 3 



of 
3 



ge&erelisatijon to infinite dissensions! 



fraraa^Lai&as wmhsm&Uz 30 .or 32 






■» Con l%s Mgebaa &i ec , mig&Ksxa, 

Credit 3 



i., i..... ,.,,,, -i. Vni' . 



CXttflllt 



is a M»»8cai i sw®® fori 

vus e®tsxs& : esedit* 

A mtm& ©S fcft ictannr aad 
.tsssfc I K5&3 aaA fxosi 1750 

■ 

radift 3 
or 

of fc««@ pxe4uetion ftisd 

materials 

' ■;-. ic philosophy 

sedit 1 

\ 

ala «^:b uiuwd, 

. 11 &«s a limited approech to 

i ma®, 

Cowadit 2 



-5- 

>sic 63 - History and Literature of Music from Monteverdi to Bach 
sod Handel. A study of the Baroque and Rococo Periods 9 including the 
rasa-sie of such conposers as Monteverdi, Seauts, Frescobaidi* Lully, 
P&chelbels Puree! I, Corelli, Cou$*eria, Raaeau, the Sc&rlefccis, Bach, 
and Handel, heading, listening, ©core study. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Music S3 or consent of instructor 

Music 64 - Haydn:, Mosart and Beethoven. Viennese classic and ©re-classic 

anisic, fading, listening, score study* 

3 class hour© Credit 3 

Prerequisite; Music 54 or comment of instructor 

ttofte 6Sa 66 Appftfl e d Music . 

— <>— nyinfrmr prTinnii ■m'fcwrii imih » & ■•* 

itopequ-ilaice s Bfao&e 46 Cgadifc 1 cash 

Muaie 67 - Basic Xnstrusiea&al Music °° String Ins&rJtaasn&s. Hie study of teas 

production amd acoustical principles ©£ the string, groop. literature and 
taste-rials Are discussed, evaluased* and assigned far reports. The basic 

problems peculiar to the strings as© presented. 

3 class hmsra Credit 2 

Prerequisite; Music Z 

jjgusJcJD - Q&thic and Raoaissaaee Vocal Music. Historical study of 
polyphonic and hozsophonlc vocal ssusie, from orgsama through, snotet and 
aadrigsl. Steading, listenings scores study, analysis* 

% class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisites Itasic S3 and consent of instructor 

Mgsic_74 - teste of the XEKth Century • An historical study of issisic in 
various! nedia, and ©mall and lasge forsss, iaeludicg Lleder, chsaber ®usie, 
sya^>hony s opera . leading , listening , score study. 
3 class hmxB Credit 3 

Prerequisite: 8&i@ic 54 ©r coaseaf; of instructor 

Magic 77 (I f II) - Music Curriculum. A study ©f the erseaisatioo ®n& 
•dUbdetratioa of a smsie education program in the el@semtasy and 
seisosfery schools* 

By asrasgemnt within oodlf ied Sdaeesioa Block Prosrsai. Credit 3 
For ISusie Majors this replaces Sdscafcloa 88. 

lilj£j!3J2t - Music of the Mth Ceatury. Systeaa&ic and historical study 
of naledty, haxigDny, tonality, ceantespoiat, fom, oircaestretion, and style 

gftaarally. Bavel s Bartok, Straviasky, Scheabers, assd otters, iterieaa 

Music* Eeading 9 listening,, score stu%„ Analysis*. 

3 class fieur® Credit 3 

Pmrs^uisite; Music §3, 54 1 or Mas&e 2, or eoaseafc of instructor 

J^sis.-P.Sjt.,86 ■■ Applied Wast e 

Pgegeajulaaaai Maaio 6 6 C redits I oaafo 



„6- 

ylc 87, 88 - Score Reading and Conduct ins. Oper* and closed scores are 
tidied and played at the keyboard, Basic conducting patterns and 

techniques are evolved. 

3 class hours Credit 3 each 

Prerequisite: Music 62 

Philosophy 84 (II) - Political- Philosophy. A critique and attempt to de- 
velop the sorel baste for the organisation o£ huiaan life on the level© of 
national, state and of world government* with ©fecial reference to the 
crisis in the present system oi national state sovereignties and the con- 
crete proposals for its resolution, 

3 class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisites Two aeatester courses is philosophy, or 
the approval of the instructor on the basis o£ studies 
in political theory or political history. 

Frolic Utilities 71 - The nature, organisation and adBriLRlstration of 

regulated industries covering aspects of public regulation on Federal , 
State and local levels as they affect service operations. 

3 class hours Credit 3 

3hsssia& 53 - Dostoevski. Approved for 1959-60 only. 

4 study of the important works of Bestoevski. Enphasia s#ill he placed ©a 
their intrinsic artistic i&erita and on their importance for the developsssnt 
of the anther' a thought and the literary treads of the fei®a* Lectures will 
iaalcds historical and literary background in so far as necessary for an 
understanding of the works diacsaaed. The student &£11 be guided toward 
ix^e^aadent research, sEatare close presentation, a&d discaaaioa. 

3 els&a hours Credit 3 

Prerequisite; Junior standing. 1© Zotowledge o£ Russian 
repulsed except for Suasi&n sajors. 

Bnasian S4 - Telatoy. Approved few 195$»6® aaly. 

A stsjdy of the isportant tararlta ©f Tolatay. iSaphasis will ha placed on 

thai? intrinsic artistic asartts and on their iiapostaaee for the davslopfs&imt 

of the author's thought asid literary treads of the tlats. Lecturee will in* 

el&sde historical and literary bachg&ound in so far $$ necessary for an under- 

atondi^g of the ®arh© diaeassed* The atttdeat will he guided toward issde™ 

pendent research, mature class presentation, and diseusaiea* 

3 elasa hours Cnadit 3 

Prerequisite; Junior standing, Ho fcno&ledtge o£ Eussian 

required except for fiusaiasi eajora. 

£B££eJ* a 8i » Shoaetica. A sela&tlCic study of the production of the sounds 

of Saglish; analysis and description of individual vomls and consonants . 
toady of the International Fhe&atie Alphabet; training in auditory 



3 class hours Credit 3 

ggeach 82, {XX) - Introduction to Clinical Practice. Training in basic 

diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for various speech hs&dicapa$ aphasia 

©a airtlculation defects-, delayed speech and stuttering* Supervised clinical 



2 glass hoars $ 1 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 

fteaaragelaites Speech 81, 8S 



mtf aa 

£§£!lJ$LJ23L • Anatorcy and Physiology of the Speech end Hearing 
sh&niss&u A study of ttte aoatoiay and physiology of fehe speeds and hear- 
ing, mechanism. Consideration of pheastlon> resonance, articulation =a»d 
audition* 

3 class hoars Credit: 3 

Prerequisite; Zoology 3? s 38 a . or equivalent 

^S^^M^ffii ** Audlology. A study of fche sy»g»teiBS and censes of hearing 
special attention to diagnostic test procedures. Supervisee practice in 
autiioisstric testing. Observation; .field trips. 
3 class hoars Credit 3 

Pceseqnisites Speech 85 

%eech @5 i (I) i - Introduction to Speeeh Pathology* A stu<% of the- causes , 
functional and organic, of speech problems among children and adoltsg 
principles of diagnosis and therapy. Observations field trip®. 
3 class honrs Credit 3 

Pse&eqnialte: Psychology 2o 




.nral Senineerim 81 (1S1) • Slestents of Food fegim^xteg 1 in place 
Agricultural Engineering 80 , Poe4 Process Keg 



?®@4 Engineering IX. 



. §e£&nee 56 CII) • 



sat Processing - increased from % to 3 cradles. 
Science S6 III) - Lives&oelt Production - inerttaned from 3 to 4 credits. 



njoitsl Science 78 (II) - Badxy Cattle Production ?©* 

4 e&editS. 



sosed f rem 3 to 



\« . i. ■« 



: Some lisaageaent • deeseosed, from 3 to 2 credits « 

- Evolution * ineseased front 2 t© 3 exeddLtcs. 



&es S3 * change I 



llathe^aaties H4 - charge In wmheis from Mathematics ?8 * Hwafirleal ^aalysis (II), 
B&sga®%gafc&ea 93 s, change la sunfoec £r«a Kathmsstlcs 91 - Feusrier Series amd 



ice 94 XI * change in masSMgs f i 

Calculus. 



ities 92 • Theoretical 



lagsll^^Sl - S&dical and Snrgic&l Htossing I - Increased £soa 16 to 17 credits . 



Inrni^l^^O »$fedic&l and 5ex@£c&l Itesis^ II * increased £xom 16 to 18 credits. 



~8" 

■*s£ag 52B <I) - Stars im ©£ Children II - decreased ixcm 10 to 5 credits • 

Sursitm 5ft (I'x) -> Fsycnxatvic Iforeim - decreased £%<sm 10 to '8 credits., 

Kuts£»sS7 - Haternity itasiim - inaseased from 10 to 16 credits. 

tteaing 58 (XI) » Ftobiic Qealth Gfersivg - increased fxogk-6 to 8 credits, 

S&iratag 66 (II) * Senior StasiEK SesAaar - changed fros 4 credits to 
3 osr 4 credits. 

Pljysic&I Sdaeatiea 80 <I) and (III - Briwar Sdncefiloa 2^stxnetos Course - 
increased Crams Uo3 credits. 

&IX ©iericjalfcrare* Penology, Flatfieu&tttre and Hdxt&aBlfettSfe eaasrses will 
now be listed as Hozt£euic«g& gausses vitb aparepslafie saadwiaes. 

Deletion o£ Ceaapsea 

a^rlcBltaxal SBg&tegKins SO - S?eod Process Ez&£eee*l3ig 

AaMsl Science 74 • Advanced &ea&& 
itaftsaV Science 77 CD - &airy Gat&le Pradnatien 
imisml Selence HI CI) - Ses&fsasr 
Food TeetmeiosY 85 - Maris© Products Tec&t&oiasy 
Food Tacaselesy §§ - Marina Psotosta See&e&iegy 
Fo^ M Jejei5gsolp^; ii §6 • Xntzednctosy Eaaeasrch I tatbeda 
Fesd Himasai&en& &S » Kitchen Adssiniatrafcioa 
Fecc»tsz£2 - The Kaangeaana of Ss&Ll Voodlaads 
Gess&a 58 - Middle High Gossan 
Gskssss €3 - Genasa Litesagase 

tSattasB&to €© - Spta?ical l T r%aii0Mefey asd Solid itolj£ia Geoaatvy 
. Magfeasaafeics SI - Dl££eraa££al Gaca&sfccy 



-9- 



bew cmmam courses 



M£££s£$£M§&J£& " Advaisce^ Virology. Credits chsa^geel to read "3 to 3" 
&ak that prerequisites be as folicsrs: Bacteriology ' 96 aaad permission of 
instructor. Tfe© extra credits will fee given for l&borafcory work in the 
£oxm of a problem* 

History 200 * Special Problems in History* Directed research and writing 

for *tuali£i£& students. 

Prerequisite* peraiesidn of instmetser Credit 1-3 

History 257 - Sesainar is American History, 3.88O-i930» Tfiai&tqg in 
historical research. 

Prereqtjisifce, permission of instructor Credit 3 



ATTACHMENT C 



REPORT OP THE COMMITTEE TO DISCUSS 
POUR COLLEGE COOPERATION AT THE GRADUATE LEVEL 



The Committee recommends that a cooperative Ph. D. 
program be established by Amherst, Mount Holyoke and 
Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts. 
The degree would be awarded by the University of Massa- 
chusetts but some and perhaps much and in a few excep- 
tional cases even all of the work leading to the degree 
might be done in one or more of the other institutions. 

When a student has been awarded a degree under 
this program, the fact that it is a cooperative Ph. D. 
degree involving Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith Col- 
leges and the University of Massachusetts is to be in- 
dicated on the diploma, the permanent record card and 
all transcripts, as well as on the Commencement Pro- 
gram* 

The requirements for the degree would be identi- 
cal to those for the Ph. D. degree at the University 
of Massachusetts* except for the statement relating t# 
"residence 11 . For the cooperative Ph. D. degree "resi- 
dence" is defined as the institution where the thesis 
work is being done. 

Graduate Faculty membership would be open to 
qualified individuals belonging to any of the four 

* U. of M. Ph.D. requirements are Included in Appendix 1 



~2- 



Faculties. The method of election to the Graduate 
Faculty Is listed in Appendix 2. 

The Graduate Council (subject to approval by the 
Board of Trustees) would determine general policy, 
approve courses and degree requirements, set admission 
policies, appoint thesis committees and in general ad- 
minister all aspects of the cooperative Ph. D. program 
just as it does the other advanced degrees at the 
University of Massachusetts • Faculty members from 
Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith would retain member- 
ship on the Graduate Council. The members of the 
Council would be selected in accordance with estab- 
lished procedures of the various institutions. 

Participation in the cooperative Ph. D. program 
by departments of the four institutions would be on a 
voluntary basls 8 Representatives of interested cor- 
responding departments in the four colleges should 
discuss the program as it relates to them. If they 
elect to offer the cooperative Ph. D. degree they 
should petition the Graduate Council. In studying 
the proposals the Council should give careful atten- 
tion to such factors as faculty interest in research 
and teaching advanced courses, graduate curriculum, 
equipment and facilities, library resources, funds 
for fellowships and other factors which might influ- 



«M ^ — . 



ence the success of the undertaking. 

Participation by individual faculty members would 
also be on a voluntary basis. Faculty time required 
for the work involved in the cooperative Ph. D. program 
should be taken into consideration when calculating 
service loads. The problem of extra compensation 
should not be raised because the work would be done as 
part of a total program. On the other hand, if a mem- 
ber of one Faculty were to offer a graduate course at 
another of the four institutions compensation would be 
arranged according to the plan already in force. 

Course work for the cooperative Ph. D # degree 
could be taken at any of the four institutions. Tui- 
tion charges would be handled exactly as they now are 
for the interchange of students at the undergraduate 
level. 

The search for graduate fellowship support for 
the cooperative Ph. D. candidate would be the respon- 
sibility of the major professor and his department. 
Any of the four colleges could provide graduate assist- 
antships. The provision of equipment to be used by 
cooperative Ph. D. candidates would be the responsi- 
bility of the major professor and his departments 
The Gommlttee recognises the possibility that there 
may be instances of sharing but does not recommend 



t • . 



~l±~ 



joint ownership of ordinary laboratory equipment. Spec- 
ial cases of unusually expensive items could be discus- 
sed if the need arose. 

The Committee recommends that as soon as the co- 
operative Ph, D. program has been approved, groups of 
departments in all four institutions which have ex- 
pressed an interest in cooperation at the Ph. D. level 
be invited to submit applications to the Graduate Coun- 
cil* We are confident that as soon as the plan is an- 
nounced many other groups of corresponding departments 
in the four Institutions will show an interest in the 
program and will eventually participate in it. 



The Committee recommends that each of the four 
institutions continue to offer the Masters Degree on 
an individual basis© This would not preclude coopera- 
tive effort along the lines already familiar at the 
undergraduate level. It would also be possible, of 
course, for a Masters candidate at any of the institu- 
tions to apply for admission to the cooperative Ph. D, 
program. 



Ralph A, Beebe, Amherst College 

Lucy W. Pickett, Mount Holyoke 

College 
Kenneth Sherk, Smith College 



Gilbert L. Woods lde, University of 

Massachusetts 



February 9, 1959 



-5- 



Appendix 1 
Ph.D. Requirements at the University of Massachusetts 



In order to provide proper direction for the Ph.D. 
candidate, a Guidance Committee of three will be ap- 
pointed, or if necessary reappointed, for each student 
as soon as possible after his first registration as a 
candidate for the doctorate, and not later than two 
months after his first registration,, This Committee 
will be appointed by the Scholarship Committee of the 
Graduate Council from members of the Graduate Faculty, 
recommended by the Department Head of the student's 
major department, and will consist of two members of 
the .major department and one other person. 

This Guidance Committee shall meet with the candi- 
date as soon as possible after the appointment has 
been made. At least three weeks prior to the candi- 
date's second registration the Committee shall file in 
the Graduate Office a summary of the proposed major 
and minor program of the student, including specific 
courses recommended by the Committee In addition to 
this original meeting with the student, the Guidance 
Committee's responsibilities shall be to: 

a. Plan the entire Graduate School program 
of the student. 

b. Arrange for the preliminary written com- 
prehensive examination of the student, 

c. Plan for the satisfying of the language 
requirement by the student. 

d. Supervise the thesis project and arrange 
for the final examination. The Guidance 
Committee will serve as the Thesis Commit- 
tee for the Ph»D. candidate 

e. Report the fulfillment of all requirements 
to the head of the major department; the 
vote of the Committee to be unanimous on 
this, 

The degree is conferred upon graduate students 
who have met the following requirements : 

1. The preparation of a dissertation satisfactory to 
the Guidance Committee and the major department. 

2. The successful completion of graduate courses in 
the major field and in a minor field or fields related 



■ K '. ■ ■ 



•6- 



to, but not part of the major field* The Guidance Com- 
mittee will determine the number of graduate credits., 
which the student must earn in the major and minor fields 
provided that at least 15 credits must be earned in the 
minor field. 

3» The passing of a preliminary written comprehensive 
examination in the major and minor fields, supplemented 
by an oral examination at the option of the major de- 
partment, both examinations to be conducted by the 
major department, to be passed not later than eight 
months before the completion of the candidate's work. 

The department in which the student has enrolled 
for courses in the minor field has a choice of submitting 
questions for the comprehensive examination or the certi- 
fying of the student as having satisfied all the require- 
ments of each course, except that the examination is re- 
quired for all courses where the grade in the course was C. 

If the student fails a part of the comprehensive 
examination he may be permitted to make up the deficiency 
under the direction of his Guidance Committee, In caso 
of failure of the entire comprehensive examination, a can- 
didate may be permitted a second and final opportunity but 
not within twelve months, 

^, Satisfying the following language requirements: two 
languages, foreign to the candidate and not in the same 
linguistic group, as recommended by the major department. 
Proficiency tests should be passed as early as possible *. 
and must be passed prior to the preliminary examination. 

5« The passing of a final examination, at least partly 
oral, oonducted by the Guidance Committee primarily upon, 
but not limited to, the contents of the candidate's dis- 
sertation It cannot be scheduled until all members of 
the Thesis Committee have approved the thesis. The oral 
examination is to be conducted by the Thesis Committee, 
The Examining Committee is to consist of the Thesis Com- 
mittee, the Dean of the Graduate School, the Dean of the 
School or College in which the department is located, and 
such members of the major department as the head shall ap- 
point. In order to pass, the candidate must receive the 
unanimous vote of the Thesis Committee. Not more than one 
dissenting vote shall be allowed for the total Examining 
Committee present. 

6. Satisfying the residence requirement. Three years be- 
yond the bachelor's degreo are required. The equivalent of 
at least one academic year of full-time graduate work must 
be spent at the University of Massachusetts. No credit is 
valid aftes* nine years* 

?•' All fees and expenses must be paid before the degree 
Will be conferred. 



i t 



•■ ,1 ■ •■ 1 ; 



'• \ 



1 



-7- -Footnote - 



Graduate Reading Examination in Foreign Languages 

1. A Graduate Reading Examination will be given 

by the German and Romance Language Departments upon 
written request from the head of the department in 
which the student in question is doing his graduate 
work. The request should be sent to the head of the 
language department concerned, via the Dean of the 
Graduate School, at least ten days before the exami- 
nation is to be administered, 

2. The examination will be given three times during 
the academic year. 

3» Prior to the administration of the reading exam- 
ination the student may, if he and the representa- 
tive of the language department agree, have a brief, 
Informal Interview so that it can be determined 
whether he has reached the point at which he Is like- 
ly to deal competently with Ph.D. reading material In 
the foreign language. 

^. The examination will be a written test of the 
student's ability to translate with mature compre- 
hension from the foreign language into English. The 
use of a dictionary will be permitted. 

5. The examination will consist of passages taken 
from books and/or journals pertaining to the major 
field in which the graduate student is working. 

6. A committee of three members of the language de- 
partment concerned will grade the examination, 

7. The Graduate Office, the head of the department 
requesting the examination, and the graduate student 
concerned will be notified within ten days of the 
examination whether the student has passed or failed. 

8. In case of failure, a study period of at least 
four months will be required before a re-examination 
may be given, unless otherwise agreed upon. In the 
case of repeated failure, the candidate will not be 
admitted to the examination for the fourth time un- 
less the language department concerned is satisfied 
that he has made adequate progress. 



♦*8* 
Appendix 2 
The Graduate Faculty 



Members of the Graduate Faculty are selected In 
the following manner: A Department Head recommends ttye 
name of the prospective member to the Dean bt the Gradu- 
ate School by letter, which must have the approval of 
the Dean of the Faculty member's school or college* 
The recommendation must be accompanied by a form which 
has been filled out by the Department Head. 

The general criteria of membership on the Gradu- 
ate Faculty: 

1* Membership on the; faculty of a graduate 
degree-granting college, or school, pro- 
viding approved graduate courses. 

2* Graduate training* 

3» Productive research 

4, Professional activity and interests. 

The qualifications of the individual are assessed 
by a committee of the Graduate Council* The Qualifi- 
cations Committee then recommends to the entire Graduate 
Council whose affirmative vote is necessary for admis- 
sion to the Graduate Faculty • 

The duties of the Graduate Faculty would include 
the- following: * 

1. Direct the research for all advanced degrees* 

Z. Constitute thesis committees for all ad- 
vanced degrees* 

3# Elect, subject to the approval of the Presi- 
dent, certain members of the Graduate School - 
Council 

Me m Vote on the qualifications of candidates 
for all advanced degrees* 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

September 19, 1959, 10:30 a.m., Student Union Building 

U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 

Cashin, Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Kiernan, 

Schuck, Whitmore, President 

Mather. Also, Secretary 

Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson 

and Budget Commissioner 

Morrissey representing Governor 

Furcolo 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Presi- 
dent Mather called the meeting to order. On motion duly made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To elect Dr. Frank L. Boyden, Acting Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees on 
August 4, 1959 were approved as distributed. 

Acting Chairman Boyden announced he had received a letter 

of resignation from President Mather. On motion duly made and 

seconded, the following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Whereas Jean Paul Mather, Fourteenth President of the 
University of Massachusetts, has served in 
that office with high distinction and real 
dedication for more than five of the most 
crucial years in the University's history-- 

And Whereas he has during that half -de cade raised the in- 
stitution—in enrollment, curriculum, faculty 
and staff, and research--to a position in the 
first rank of universities performing the 
highest public service to the nation's youth 
and citizenry at large-- 

And Whereas his selfless devotion to the task of champion- 
ing the principles underlying the whole con- 
cept of public higher education has had strong 
impact on the thinking of educators throughout 
America-- 



2107 



Frank L. 
Boyden 



J. Paul 
Mather 



2L08 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



And Whereas he has shown the courage of pioneers in the 
way he has given direction to educational 
aims and aspirations in this Commonwealth 
and has shown high responsibility in main- 
taining that direction for the benefit of 
the Commonwealth's youth- - 

Therefore be it resolved: 

That the Board of Trustees, faced with the 
voluntary and irrevocable resignation of 
the President, effective on or before 
June 30, 1960, accepts his decision, but 
only with the greatest regret; for it is 
the conviction of this Board that the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts has lost an 
educator-humanitarian whose career will 
be a determinant in the shaping of the 
future of education. 

President Mather thanked the Board of Trustees for their 
whole-hearted support given him during his presidency. He 
appreciated the opportunity the Board of Trustees gave him to prove 
himself in a position demanding a high degree administrative 
capacity and said his service at the University of Massachusetts 
was a rich administrative experience. 

Many Trustees pointed out that the Board of Trustees 

should immediately seek a successor to the President and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To direct and empower the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees to seek candidates 
for the office of President and report to the 
Board of Trustees at the next Board meeting 
on November 3, 1959. 

Any member who has suggestions concerning candidates for 

the presidency are asked to contact members of the Executive 

Committee. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Acting Chairman Boyden appointed the following members 
to the Committee on Athletics: Relph F. Taber, Chairman, Dennis 
M. Crowley, William M. Cashin, Joseph P. Healey and Philip F. 
Whitmore. 

The annual meeting of the Association of Governing Boards 

will meet in Stillwater, Oklahoma October 14 - 17, 1959. On motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To send delegates to the meeting of the 
Association of Governing Boards and to 
authorize the Acting Chairman to appoint 
such delegates. 

Any trustee who would like to be a delegate is to so in- 
form Acting Chairman Boyden. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments and other personnel 
actions included in the list entitled Attach- 
ment A which is attached to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the installation of a plaque 
on Machmer Hall commemorating the founding 
of Phi Sigma Kappa on the campus of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

The meeting adjourned at 11:10 a.m. 




Secretary 



2L09 



Committee on 
Athletics 



Association 
of Governing 
Boards 



Personnel 
Actions 



Phi Sigma 
Kappa plaque 



2L10 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Attachment A 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
September 19, 1959 

APPOINTMENTS 

ALLAIRE, Francis R. , Jr., Instructor "A", Dairy and Animal Science (% time), 
effective September 13, 1959 at $2,535 per year, B.S. University of Massa- 
chusetts, 1959. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

BLACK, Donald L. , Assistant Professor "A", Dairy and Animal Science, effective 
September 20, 1959 at $5,889 per year. B.S. University of Maine, 1954; M.S. 
Cornell, 1957; Ph.D. Cornell, 1959. Since receiving Ph.D. in February 1959, 
Dr. Black has been employed in a temporary instructor ship at Cornell. 

BRENNAN, James A. , Assistant Professor of Psychology (Visiting Lecturer - 1/3 
time), effective September 1, 1959 at $1,690 per year. B.A. American Inter- 
national College, 1953; M.A. Springfield College, 1956. Instructor, American 
International College, 1958 to date. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School, 

BUXTON, Joseph R. , Instructor in Government (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September I, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. A.B. University of Notre 
Dame, 1959. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

CORNISH, Geoffrey S. , Assistant Professor of Agronomy (1/4 time), effective 
November 15, 1959 at $1,267.50 per year. B.S. University of British Columbia, 
1935; M.S. University of Massachusetts, 1950. Mr. Cornish taught at the 
University from 1947-52 and since that time has been a professional golf course 
architect . 

CORWIN, Alan R. , Instructor "A", Dairy and Animal Science (1/2 time), effective 
August 16, 1959 at $2,535 per year. B.S. University of Vermont, 1946. Plans 
to enter our Graduate School. Instructor-Supervisor, Veterans On-The-Farm 
Training, 1946-51; Sales work, 1951-54; Herdsman, Maiden Hill Farm, Haverhill, 
Mass., 1954-55; Farm Manager, Dairy Farm, Bridgewater, Mass., 1955-59. 

FROST, Irwin S. , Instructor in Physics (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. A.B. Hunter College, 1959. 
Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

G00DALE, Ronald J., Instructor in Government (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.A. Manhattan College, 
1959. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

GOODRICH, Ralph W. , Assistant Professor of Education (1/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $1,690 per year. B.S. University of New Hampshire-, M.A. 
Yale University. Has been Superintendent of Amherst schools since January 1953, 

KASS0F, Allen, Assistant Professor of Sociology (Visiting Lecturer - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $845 per year. B.A. Rutgers University, 1952; 
M.A. Harvard University, 1959. Instructor, Smith College, 1957-59. 

KIM, Se Jin, Instructor in Government (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.A. Southwestern College, 1959. 

LANDY, Macreay J. , Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 tim$, 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.A. Amherst College, 1959. 
Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 



2. 



APPOINT M ENTS (continued) 



MAKE, Loic, Instructor in Romance Languages (Teaching Associate - 1/2 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $2,158 per year. A.B. and M.A. University of 
Paris and Scole Normal Superieure de Saint-Cloud. Has taught in the French 
Institute of the University College, British Museum, London. 

MICHELSON, Lewis F. , Instructor "A", Agronomy, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,070 per year. B.S. and M.S. university of Massachusetts, 1950 and 1955; 
Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, 1959. Taught for eight years, managed 
family business for two years, U.S. Navy War Service for four years. 

MORSE, Elaine, Instructor in Sociology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.A. University of 
Massachusetts, 1959. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

O'BRIEN, Robert L. , Instructor in Physics (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.S. University of 
Massachusetts, 1959. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

TEWKSBURY, Sheila A., Instructor in Physics (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year. B.S. Simmons College, 1959, 
Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

WENTWORTH, Bernard, Instructor S A :: , Poultry (% time), effective August 30, 
1959 at $2,535 per year. 3.S. University of Maine, 1957. Presently enrolled 
in our Graduate School. 



APPOINTl-JENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

ANNABLE, William P., Instructor :: A", Agricultural Engineering (% time), 
effective September 13, 1959 at $2,652 per year (1 step above minimum), to be 
paid from Eastern States Fund. 3.S. University of New Hampshire, 1955. He 
is presently enrolled in our Graduate School. Last year he was an Instructor 
in Agricultural Engineering at the University of Massachusetts but resigned 
August 31, 1959 in order to devote more time to graduate study. 

BANTA, Luther H. , Professor 7 A", Administration, effective August 13, 1959 
at $9,828 per year (maximum). To be paid from International Cooperation Ad- 
ministration (ICAc-1129). Mr. Banta is to be Technical Leader of the PIO 33- 
90034 - Japanese group "Agricultural Development in Cold and Cool Regions" 
special short course being conducted by the ICA, Washington, D. C. for the 
period August 13 through October 21, 1959. 

COLLINS, William H. , Instructor, Agricultural Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $4,732 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. Is completing requirements for M.S. degree this 
summer. 



3. 
APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINI MUM (continued) 

FRASER, Harry E. , Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, effective 
September 1, 1959 at $6,474 per year (maximum). B.S. University of Massa- 
chusetts, 1926. Experience: Civil Engineer and Designer, Planting Foreman for 
a nursery, affiliated with Warren H. Manning Offices, Inc. in charge of draft- 
ing room and supervisor, self-employed in own office, worked with Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, Officer in Air Corps Intelligence, teacher at Vesper George 
School of Art, associated with several beach projects, National Parks in 
Washington, D.C. 

GOODCHILD, Irwin L. , Instructor in Physics, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$4,940 (3 steps above minimum). B.S. A. and B.S. University of Massachusetts, 
1955 and 1956, working toward M.S. degree now. 

WILLIAMS, Robert M. , Instructor in Chemistry, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$5,140 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. Dartmouth College, 1951; M.S. 
University of New Hampshire, 1953; Ph.D. Iowa State College, 1958. Has had 
teaching experience at University of New Hampshire and Iowa State College. 
Presently doing post-doctoral research at University of California. 



REINSTATEMENT 



COLLINS, Dan S. , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1959 at $5,564 
per year. He is returning after a semester's leave of Absence without pay. 



CHANGE TO FULL- T IME EMPLOYMENT 

WAGNER, Robert W. , Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 1959 at 
$3,634 per year. Has been on 3/4 time basis since March 1, 1959. 



TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT 

JOHNSON, Donald J. , Assistant Football Coach for the period August 18 to 
November 18, 1959 at $500 for the period, to be paid from 03 funds. 



EXTRA COMPENSATION 

COBB, Justin, Intramural Director for the period September 1, 1959 to June 1, 
1960 at $500 for the period, to be paid from Athletic Trust Funds. 

DiMINNO, Rosemarie, Research Associate, USPHS Grant H-2296C5 for the period 
July 27 -September 12, 1959 at $66.00 per week - or a total of $462.00. 

RAUCH, Harold, Principal Investigator, for the period September 1-5, 1959 at 
$67.12 per week and for the period September 6, 1959 through August 31, 1960 
at $69.75 per week - under USPHS Research Grant 5921 CI. 



4. 

EXTRA COMPEN S ATION (continued) 

ROBERTS, John L. , Assistant Professor of Physiology (at 1/2 rate of annual 
salary, the other 1/2 to be paid by University as sabbatical leave pay), from 
August 30, 1959 through June 5, I960 at $60 per week. For the period June 6, 
1960 into week of August 21, 1960 he will be paid $120 per week but not to 
exceed a total of $1,336 or 2/9 of his annual salary. He is to be paid under 
Research Grant RG-6377, USPHS. 

SWENS0N, Paul A. , Summer Investigator, AEC AT (30-1) 1373 for the period 
June 15- July 31, 1959 at $100 per week - not to exceed $700. 

SWENS0N, Paul A., Summer Investigator, 1959-60 AEC AT (30-1) 1378 for the 
period August 17-21, 1959 - at $100 for the period. 



NATIONAL S C IENCE FOU NDATION 

CASHIN, Kenneth D. , Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, to be paid 
1/40 time, $181.35 per week and the total amount is not to exceed $362.70 - 
to be paid from funds under research grant NSF-G3292. 

JONES, Phillips R* , Assistant Professor of Physics, to be paid 1/9 of his 
annual salary ($6,006) or $667.33 from Research Project NSF-G9502 during the 
period August 12-September 11, 1959. 



INSTITUTE FOR SECONDARY SCHOO L TE ACHERS OF FRENCH, SAE 3306 

— m*mm* m »— w— w ■ mm — ^— m i i > j» m i »mh i »m ■ »— — — w+*mw m mm*timmmm mmmmm** «i im ' ■ h m»m—— 1 1 1 1 ■■ wmm*m — mmmn+mm»** >mmamm*mmnwm tmmm — 

HULL, Alexander, Jr., Assistant Professor, for the period September 1, 1959 
through August 29, 1960 at $27.75 per week and not to exceed $1,443. 

JOHNSON, Robert B. , Associate Professor, for the period September 1, 1959 
through August 29, 1960 at $69.75 per week for the period up to January 23, 1960 
and $72.37 for the period January 24-August 29, 1960 - and not to exceed 
$3,708.74. 

SMITH, Harold L. , Jr., Assistant Professor, for the period September 1, 1959 
through August 29, 1960 at $26.63 per week - not to exceed $1,334.76. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR G. E. PR OG RAM, PITTSFIE LD 

** BRAGD0N, Harrison, Instructor in Mathematics, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $359.66. 

** McNUTT, William J., Instructor in Mathematics, first semester of academic . 
year 1959-60 at $359.66. 

** ROBERTS, Norman W. , Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $719.33. 

** New to program 



5. 

EMERITUS 

ALEXANDER, Charles P. , Professor of Entomology, Emeritus, effective 
October I, 1959. 

SIELIKG, Dale H. , Dean of the College of Agriculture, Director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station and Director of the Cooperative Extension 
Service, Emeritus, effective July 1, 1959. 



REAPPOINTMENT 



ROGERS, Vincent R. , Assistant Professor of Education, effective 
Sepfcessber 20, 1959 at $6,474 per year - to be paid 31/32 of his 
annual salary. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Memorandum 



Prom: 



To: 



William P. Field 
Provost McCune 



September 1, 1959 



Subject: Extra Compensation - Summer Counseling Program 



Following is a list of those faculty members who participated in the 
Summer Counseling Program. Following each person's name are the dates 
on which he participated, the number of dates and' the number for which 
he should receive extra compensation of twenty-five dollars: 



NAME 



DATES OF SERVICE 



NUMBER OF UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT $25.00 EACH 



ALLEN, LUTHER A 

ANDERSEN, ALLEN E 

BATES, MAURICE E 

BIQELOW, HOWARD. E 
BISCHOFF, DAVID C 
BOUDREAU, HAROLD L 

BOUTELLE> HAROLD D 
BURAK, GEORGE J 

CALDWELL, THEODORE C 
CARY, HAROLD W 



June 19, 26, 
July 1, 17, 
August 11, 14 

June 19 
July 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 14 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 14 

August 14 

August 7, 11, 14 

June 26 
July 1, 17 
August 14 

July 1 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17 

June 26 

July 1, 17, 31 

August 7, 11, 14 

August 7, 11, 14 



6 

8 
1 
3 

4 
1 



7 
3 



- 2 - 



NAME 

CASHING, KENNETH D 

COOK, GLADYS M 
DAVIS, EDWARD L 

DUUS, HANS C 
EHRLICH, LEONARD H 

ESSELEN, KATHERINE L 
GOODCHILD, IRWIN L 
GREENBAUM, LOUIS S 

GREENFIELD, SUMNER M 

HARRIS, JOHN S 
HAYDON, RANDY 
HELLER, PETER 

HELMING, VERNON P 

JONES, PHILLIPS R 

KAUFFMAN, SIDNEY W 



DATES OF SERVICE 



July 31 

August 7, 11, 14 

August 6, 10 

June 19, 26 
July 31 
August 7, 11 

Juna 26 
July 1 

June 19 

July 1, 17, 31 

August 7, 11, 14 

August 14 

August 7, 14 

June 19, 26 
July 17. 31 
August 7, 11, 1** 

June 19 
July 31 
August 7 

July 17 

August 11 

June 26 
July 1, 17 

July 1. 17, 31 
August 7 3 11, 14 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 



NUMBER OF UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT &25«0O EACH 

4 

1 



7 
1 
2 



3 
1 
1 

3 
6 



7 
5 



- 3 - 



NAME 

KOEHLER, STANLEY G 
KORSON, HENRY J 

KRZYSTOFIK, ANTHONY T 

KYLER, RUDOLPH H 
LANGPORD, JOSEPH W 
LEA, HENRY A 

LEWIT, DAVID W 

LINDSEY, ERNEST E 
LUDTKE, JAMES B 
MENDEL, MANLEY 

OBERLANDER, GEORGE J 

O'LEARY, HELEN P 

OSGOOD, ELMER C 

RAUCH, HAROLD 



DATES OF SERVICE 


NUMBER OF. UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT 1)2 5.00 EACH 


June 19 




1 


June 19, 26 
July 1, 17 
August 11 




5 


July 31 
August 7, ,11, 


lb 


k 


July 17 




1 


June 19 




l 



July 31 

August 7, U, 1^ 

June 26 
July 1 

June 19 

June 26 

June 26 

July 1, 17, 31 

August 7, 11, 1** 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17 
August 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17 
August 7, 11 

June 19, 26 
July 1 ; 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1 



2 

1 
1 



8 
3 



- fy .. 



NAME 

RITCHIE, WALTER S 
RIVERS, ROBERT L 
ROGERS, VINCENT R 

ROLLASON, DUNCAN H 

SINGER, FRANK A 
SMITH, HAROLD L 

TRAHAN, ELIZABETH W 



DATES OP SERVICE 



June 19 
July 31 

July 31 

August 7> 11 > 14 

June 19 j 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 14 

June 19 
July 1, 17 

July 1 

June 26 
August 11 

June 19 



NUMBER OP UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT &2 5.00 EACH 



8 

3 

1 

2 

1 



WAGNER, ROBERT W 
WEAVER, WILLIAM H 

WILKINSON, THOMAS 

WILLIAMS, ARTHUR R 

ZAJICEK, OLIVER T 



June 26 

July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1** 

June 19 
August 14 

June 26 

July 1, 17, 31 

August 7, 11, 14 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 14 



1 
6 
2 



8 



- 5 - 



The members of the English department, wfeio read the Essays for each of 
the groups, is as follows: (Each reading period should be compensated 
for at the rate of twenty dollars). 



NAME 



BARRON, LEONE A 



COLLINS, DAN S 



HORRIGAN, LEONTA G 



KOEHLER, STANLEY G 



DATES OF SERVICE 



June 19, 26 
July 1 

July 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

July 1? 

August 7, 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1 



NUMBER OP UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT $20.00 EACH 

3 
5 



The three members of the Speech department, who conducted the speech 
evaluations, each participated in all eight of the programs. Their 
compensation should be at the rate of twenty-five dollars per f sssien. 



NAME 



HARPER, RICHARD D 



NIEDECK, ELEANOR 



PEIRCE, HENRY B 



DATES OF SERVICE 



June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

June 19, 26 
July 1, 17, 31 
August 7, 11, !**• 



NUMBER OF UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT 125.00 EACH 



8 



8 



8 



- 6 - 



On the final day cf each program, additional members of the Physical 
Education for Men faculty, aided the counselor in conducting profi- 
ciency tests. It is recommended that for each of these periods they 
be given ten dollars additional compensation. 



NAME 



BISCHOFP, DAVID C 



COBB, JUSTIN h 



GARBER, RICHARD P 



DATES OP SERVICE 



June 19, 26 
July 1, 31 

July 17, 31 
August 7, 11, 1^ 

July 17 

August 7, 11, V* 



NUMBER OF UNITS 
FOR COMPENSATION 
AT &10.00 EACH 



5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

October 9, 1959, 11:00 a.m., Governor's Office, State House, Boston 

Governor Furcolo presiding 

PRESENT: Governor Furcolo, Trustees Boyden, 
Brett, Brown, Cashin, Crowley, Fox, 
Haigis, Healey, Hoftyzer, McDermott, 
McNamara, S chuck, Taber, Whitmore. 
Also, Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson, Budget Commissioner Morrissey, 
Governor's staff men O'Connell and 
Lichterman, Commissioner of Administra- 
tion Mahoney 

Governor Furcolo announced that this special meeting he 
called was to discuss problems involved in recruiting a new presi- 
dent for the University of Massachusetts. He emphasized that it is 
imperative that the University get the best man possible. In his 
travels, the Governor said he became aware of an adverse attitude 
held by many people outside the Commonwealth towards public higher 
education in Massachusetts. He said the new president should be one 
who could ameliorate the adverse effects that the recent struggle 
between the University and the Legislature caused. Secondly, the 
Governor insisted that it is imperative to take every step possible 
to get the best man because as competition for staff increases, it 
will be very difficult to get the best teachers - so whoever is 
president should be influential in recruiting a good faculty. 

The Governor suggested that : 

1. There ought to be set up a recruiting procedure widely 
publicized among educators throughout the country indi- 
cating that the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts is making a determined search for the 
best possible person. 

2. The Board of Trustees should establish a set of criteria 
by which the candidates may be measured. (The Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees had established a 
set of criteria and a copy was given to the Governor.) 



2L11 



2L12 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. The salary should be raised substantially because the 
person of ability who might be selected as the next 
president would already be at a high salary level. 

4. The Board of Trustees should be making preliminary in- 
quiries about candidates for the position of President. 
The Governor suggested that perhaps the Ford Foundation 
would make a search for candidates for the Board of 
Trustees or the Board of Trustees might have some 
nationally known educational institution make a search 
for them. 

The Governor pointed out that unfortunately the salary of 
President is hopelessly inadequate and recognized that his own salar 
might be a limitation on the salary that the president could get. 
It was his idea to get a pledge from the leadership of both parties 
that they would do everything possible to solve the salary problem. 
He felt that if the salary could not be raised to a comparable level 
with that of other university presidents, then perhaps other 
perquisites could be increased to offset the salary differential. 

Acting Chairman Boyden told the Governor that the Executiv^ 
Committee of the Board of Trustees, which has been directed by the 
Board of Trustees to make the search for a president with the pur- 
pose of recommending candidates to the full Board, needed money to 
bring applicants into the state. He asked the Governor to make 
available funds to do this. 

The Governor assured the Trustees that he will make avail- 
able approximately $10,000 from emergency funds or from private 
funds at his disposal so that the Trustees can bring people into the 
Commonwealth to be interviewed for the position. 

Dr. Boyden pointed out to the Governor that the Executive 
Committee had already interviewed three candidates. 

Trustee Healey said that Massachusetts does not look good 
nationally because of the recent squabble. He felt that now is the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

opportunity to get back into a favorable light nationally by 
dramatizing the search for a new president. He recommended that 
some outside group, preferably the presidents of major universities 
in Massachusetts, be appointed as an advisory committee to the 
Board of Trustees in their search for a new president. 

Dr. Boyden described the complexities involved in re- 
cruiting a person because of the salary status. The position now 

■ 

pays $15,000 less $1200 rent on the president's dwelling. This is 
the legal situation now existing. He said it is difficult to re- 
cruit on the basis of a promissory salary that needs legislative 
action to make it effective. 

The Governor stated he is willing to make an announcement 
that in his annual message he will include a request for a salary 
increase. Furthermore, he will get together with the legislative 
leaders of both parties in an attempt to get a firm commitment from 
them that they will support such action. The Governor warned that 
this does not assure a salary increase for the position but if the 
party leaders agree to support the measure, there is an excellent 
chance that it will become law. 

At this point Governor Furcolo called into the meeting 
Mr. Feeney, Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, to ask 
him about the possibilities of getting the president's salary in- 
creased. Mr. Feeney said that he wanted to do all that he could 
to help the University but he could not commit the Ways and Means 
Committee to any specific figure or prejudge their attitude. He 
stated that many legislators are interested in the University of 
Massachusetts and want to help. He was especially happy that the 
Trustees are to make a wide search for a president and that he 



2L13 



2114 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



would go along with any salary request made by the Board of 
Trustees and the Governor after careful deliberation has been given 
the matter. Mr. Feeney pointed out that the University of Massa- 
chusetts deserves the best and he is desirous of seeing that the 
best personnel is recruited. 

It was suggested that studies be made about the president' £ 
salary throughout the country not only by the Governor's Office but 
also that the Legislative Research Council make a study of president^' 
salaries for the Legislature itself. 

The Governor said that he would call in the legislative 
leaders of both parties soon and will do the best he can in getting 
the salary raised. 

The meeting adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




jjlA^'lsJ-' Secretary 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
October 9, 1959, 1:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 
Acting Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, Cash in, 
Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Healey, Hoftyzer, 
McDermott, McNamara, Schuck, Taber, 
Whitmore. Also, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson, Budget Commissioner 
Morrissey and Mr. Lichterman of the 
Governor's staff. 

The minutes of the meeting of September 19, 1959 were 
approved as distributed. 

Acting Chairman Boyden said that he thought Governor 
Furcolo had made a "masterful statement" of the problem facing the 
Board of Trustees at the special trustee meeting earlier in the day. 
He thought the idea of having presidents of other institutions as 
an advisory committee to the Trustees in their problem of selecting 
a new president was splendid. 

Dr. Boyden asked authority to appoint a committee that 
would deal with the Governor in getting funds for recruiting appli- 
cants for the position of President of the University and also that 
would prepare and take necessary steps required to get the salary 
of the president raised. On motion by Mr. Crowley and seconded by 
Mr. Hoftyzer, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Acting Chairman to appoint 
a committee to deal with the Governor on 
matters pertaining to funds for recruiting 
applicants and matters pertaining to the in- 
crease in presidential salary. 

Dr. Boyden appointed the following committee: Chairman 

Fox, Brett, Healey and Whitmore. 



2115 



Committee on 

President's 

Salary 



2116 



TRUSTEE 



Shannon 
McCune 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson explained that Provost Shannon McCune 
would soon be taking an inspection trip to Hokkaido University under 
the contract the University of Massachusetts has with the Inter- 
national Cooperation Administration. He will leave the United 
States October 18 and be gone for approximately a month. While in 
Japan, a part of his time will be devoted to discussing the possi- , 
bility of an extension of the cooperative program for four more 
years. It is necessary that the Provost have protection of his 
state benefits by being on a duty status while on the inspection 
trip. It was pointed out that Provost McCune will be paid from 
funds available under the ICA contract during the trip. On motion 
by Mr. Hoftyzer and seconded by Mr. Haigis, it was 

VOTED : To place Provost Shannon McCune on duty 

status from October 18, 1959 until he re- 
turns to the campus of the University of 
Massachusetts from his inspection tour 
under the ICA contract. 

In reply to Acting Chairman Boyden's inquiry as to how 
soon funds available for travel will be made to the Trustees so 
that persons may be brought into the Commonwealth for interviews , 
Budget Commissioner Morrissey assured the Trustees that funds would 
be made available within a week. Acting Chairman Boyden announced 
that any Trustee should feel free to nominate persons for the 
position of President and that all applicants will be welcomed. 

As a source of applicants for the position of President, 
Trustee Schuck suggested that the Executive Committee go to presi- 
dents of significant institutions to get recommendations of persons 
who are distinguished scholars and who have administrative ability. 
She also suggested that the Executive Committee go to Foundations 
and inquire of their administrative officers in positions of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

responsibility in the Foundations whom they would recommend for 
candidates. Trustee Schuck said that she would advise against 
taking recommendations from the American Council on Education be- 
cause the American Council is made up of "professional educators", 
Trustee Taber said that last year at the Association of 
Governing Boards at Purdue University, Arthur Adams, President of 
the American Council on Education, delivered a speech on "The College 
President". He recommended that copies of the speech be obtained 
if possible and distributed to all the members of the Board of 



Trustees. 



Acting Chairman Boyden presented the following criteria 



which the Executive Committee was using as a guide in selecting a 
college president: 

1. The new president must have a viable philosophy of 
education- -preferably enunciated in published form. 

2. He should have an earned Ph.D. degree and a clear 
demonstration of professional ability as a scholar. 

3. He should be between thirty-five and fifty years of 
age--that is, young enough to be energetic and old 
enough to be mature about problems of higher education. 

4. He must have had experience in high administrative 
posts at major institutions of higher learning, 
preferably at public universities. 

5. It would be desirable to have a firm knowledge of 
the principles and procedures under which a land- 
grant institution operates. He should, for instance, 
know about Federal and state extension programs; 

the operation of experiment stations; and the 
financing of such programs. 

6. He should have experience in personnel administration 
and university fiscal matters. 

7. It is desirable to have experience and ability in 
relationships with legislative bodies; with private 
foundations which provide aid to education; and with 
government foundations and agencies. 



2L17 



Criteria for 

Selecting 

President 



2118 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



8. He must have a deep knowledge of curricular matters, 
and inventiveness in charting the academic future of 
the University. 

9. He must be an individual who, by exhibiting a sense 
of conviction and strong-minded regard for what he 
believes to be the best interests of the University, 
can command the respect of a large variety of pro- 
fess ionals- -scholars , teachers and researchers -- 
under his supervision. 

10. He must have the ability to sustain with a judicious 
sense of impartiality the legitimate concerns, needs 
and requirements of all colleges, schools, divisions 
and other organizational units within the general 
structure of the University, and at the same time 
act as an effective mediating force whenever such 
concerns, needs and requirements are in conflict. 

11. He must have a due regard for the necessity of 
communicating University policies and potentialities 
to both the internal and external publics that he 
serves. Internally, he must be able to interpret 
what still continues to be a changing University pro- 
gram to the Board of Trustees, students, faculty 

and others who are in close contact with the campus; 
externally, he must interpret the University program 
to the general public, and in particular to the 
executive and legislative branches of the state 
government . 

12. He must be a person who is capable of consolidating 
a still flexible educational program while at the 
same time continuing to advance that program within 
a national educational context promising greater 
challenges in the years ahead than have ever been 
experienced before. 

After much discussion of the criteria, it was pointed out 

by the Acting Chairman that this was not necessarily an inflexible 

set of requirements and that the Executive Committee would give due 

consideration to the personality and background of each candidate 



interviewed. 



On motion by Mr. Whitmore and seconded by Mr. Brett, 



it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2119 



TRUSTEE 



VOTED ; That the Acting Chairman appoint a committee 
of outstanding educators in the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as an advisory committee to 
the Board of Trustees in the selection of a 
University President. 



The meeting adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




Secretary 



2120 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 3, 1959, 12:15 p.m., Student Union, Amherst, Mass. 
Acting Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Cashin, Haigis, 
McDermott, McNamara, Schuck, Taber, 
Whitmore, President Mather; also, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson, 
Budget Commissioner Kermit Morrissey and 
Martin Lichterman of the Governor's staff 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Acting 
Chairman Boyden called the meeting to order. 

The minutes of the meeting of October 9, 1959 were 
approved as distributed. 

Dr. Boyden announced that the next meeting of the Board 
of Trustees on November 24, 1959 at 12 o'clock noon at the Statler 
Hilton Hotel in Boston would be a joint meeting with the committee 
of college presidents selected to advise the Trustees in the se- 
lection of a new president. Presidents from Harvard, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, Boston College, Boston University, Simmons, 
Regis, Holy Cross, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Clark, Amherst, 
Mount Holyoke and Smith have accepted an invitation to be present. 
The Presidents of Tufts and Williams had previous engagements. 
Dr. Boyden was unable to contact the Presidents at Brandeis and 
Wellesley. 

Dr. Boyden pointed out that the recruiting efforts of the 
Executive Committee have been circumscribed by a lack of funds for 
traveling expenses to bring candidates from out of state to be in- 
terviewed. Dr. Boyden said he had contacted many applicants by 
phone and there are three basic questions that they all ask. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. What is the relationship between the President and 
the Legislature in Massachusetts? 

2. Are traveling expenses available to come to Massa- 
chusetts to be interviewed and to inspect the Uni- 
versity operations? 

3. What is the salary? 

Mr. Morrissey promised that the lack of funds for travel 
will soon be remedied. Dr. Boyden stated that very little 
effective recruiting can be done until the salary question is 
settled. 

It was the concensus of the Board members that the Presi- 
dents of institutions of higher learning in Massachusetts who are 
to meet with the Board of Trustees should have background informa- 
tion on the problems that are confronting the University. 

On motion by Trustee Schuck and seconded by Trustee 

McNamara, it was 

VOTED : That an item of the agenda for the meeting 
with the college presidents be the question 
of establishing a committee of the college 
presidents as an advisory group to the 
Executive Committee for the selection of a 
president of the University of Massachusetts. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee, reported on committee actions taken at their meetings 

on October 2, 1959 and October 16, 1959. On recommendation of the 

committee and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : An extension of contract from June 6, 1959 

to June 22, 1959, Eastern Tree and Landscape 
Corporation, on site preparation, grading, 
etc., Women's Athletic Field - Account No. 
8258-37. 

VOTED : To accept contract No. 13 Project U-702, 

Addition to Electrical Distribution System, 
as completed, in accordance with the plans 
and specifications by Collins Electric 
Company on July 29, 1959. 



2121 



President 



Women's 

Athletic 

Field 



Electric 

Distribution 

System 



2122 



Science 
Center 

Infirmary 

TRUSTEE 



University 
Commons 



Engineering 
Shop 

Dormitories 



Women's 
Athletic Field 

Goodell 
Library 
addition 



Land 



Stiles Farm 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the third section of the Science Center. 



VOTED 



VOTED; 



VOTED: 



VOTED: 



To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the Infirmary. 

To approve the final plans and specifications, 
subject to approval of technical details, of 
the Dining Commons addition. 

To approve the final plans and specifications 
of the Engineering Shop. 

To accept the final plans and specifications, 
subject to technical corrections, of Dormitories 
#20 and #21. 



VOTED : To accept the Women's Athletic Field. 

VOTED : That the Library addition, Massachusetts State 
Project U-803 - Granger Construction Company 
contractor - be accepted subject to correction 
of minor items contained in the list in the 
hands of the Treasurer within the contract 
period of one year as provided for in the 
contract. 

Trustee Whitmore said that the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds at its meeting on October 16, 1959 directed 

the Treasurer to seek legal advice to prepare for the purchase and 

land taking of the agricultural land that was under consideration 

for the College of Agriculture. This land is described in the 

faculty committee's report entitled "Report of the Committee for 

the Purchase of Agricultural Land". Trustee Whitmore said that 

the committee was very pleased with the proposed site to be obtained 

Because the available appropriation ($150,000) may be insufficient 

to acquire all the land described in the report, if under eminent 

domain proceedings the land owners were awarded an amount of money 

in excess of the appraised value, the committee recommends exclusion 

from the taking or purchase the Stiles Farm appraised at $36,650. 

After acquisition of all other parcels of land are completed and if 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

funds are still available, the Stiles property or a portion of it 

should be acquired for orchard purposes. On the recommendation of 

the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of 

1. Trustees, to purchase from Howard F. Kellogg, 

of Hadley, Massachusetts, approximately 53 acres 
of land with the buildings thereon located on 
South Maple Street in Hadley, Massachusetts, 
described and shown on the plan contained in the 
"Report of the Committee for the Purchase of 
Agricultural Land" and further described in the 
Appraisal Report of Selwyn H. Graham, dated 
April 11, 1959, (copies of which are on file in 
the Treasurer's Office) for the appraised price 
of $30,000.00, using a portion of the appropriation 
therefor under Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the 
Acts of 1957, provided that Howard F. Kellogg can 
give a clear title to said property, and provided 
further that Howard F. Kellogg is willing to sell 
at the aforementioned appraised price, and, if 
not, to take said land and buildings by eminent 
domain for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the use of the University of Massachusetts as pro- 
vided for in said Item 8258-34 ©f Chapter 763 of 
the Acts of 1957. 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of 

2. Trustees, to purchase from Chester G. Smith, of 
Hadley, Massachusetts, approximately 100 acres 
of land with the buildings thereon, located on 
Pomeroy Lane in Hadley, Massachusetts, described 
and shown on the plan contained in the "Report of 
the Committee for the Purchase of Agricultural 
Land" and further described in the Appraisal Re- 
port of Selwyn H. Graham, dated April 11, 1959, 
(copies of which are on file in the Treasurer's 
Office) for the appraised price of $23,000,00, 
using a portion of the appropriation therefor 
under Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the Acts 

of 1957, provided that Chester G. Smith can give 
a clear title to said property, and provided 
further that Chester G. Smith is willing to sell 
at the aforementioned appraised price and, if 
not, to take said land and buildings by eminent 
domain for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the use of the University of Massachusetts as 
provided for in said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 
763 of the Acts of 1957. 



£> 1 A->0 



Howard F. 
Kellogg 



Chester G. 
Smith 



2L24 



TRUSTEE 



Osborne & 
Roger West 



Gordon & 
Ethel Cook 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of 

3. Trustees, to purchase from Osborne and Roger 
West, of Hadley, Massachusetts, two parcels of 
land of approximately 167 acres, located on 
South Maple Street in Hadley, Massachusetts, 
described and shown on the plan contained in 
the "Report of the Committee for the Purchase 
of Agricultural Land" and further described in 
the Appraisal Report of Selwyn H. Graham, 
dated April 18, 1959 (copies of which are on 
file in the Treasurer's Office) for the 
appraised price of $32,500.00, using a portion 
of the appropriation therefor under Item 8258-34 
of Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957, provided 
that Osborne and Roger West can give a clear 
title to said property, and provided further 
that Osborne and Roger West are willing to sell 
at the aforementioned appraised price, and, if 
not, to take said land by eminent domain for 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the use 

of the University of Massachusetts as provided 
for in said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the 
Acts of 1957. 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of 

4. Trustees, to purchase from Gordon and Ethel Cook, 
of Hadley, Massachusetts, two parcels of land of 
approximately 42 acres with the buildings there- 
on, located on South Maple Street in Hadley, 
Massachusetts, described and shown on the plan 
contained in the "Report of the Committee for 
the Purchase of Agricultural Land" and further 
described in the Appraisal Report of Selwyn H. 
Graham, dated April 18, 1959, (copies of which 
are on file in the Treasurer's Office) for the 
appraised price of $10,000.00, using a portion 
of the appropriation therefor under Item 8258- 

34 of Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957, provided 
that Gordon and Ethel Cook can give a clear 
title to said property, and provided further 
that Gordon and Ethel Cook are willing to sell 
at the aforementioned appraised price, and, if 
not, to take said land and buildings by eminent 
domain for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for the use of the University of Massachusetts 
as provided for in said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 
763 of the Acts of 1957. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of Trustees, 
to purchase from the Heirs of Ludwig Adamowicz of 
Hadley, Massachusetts, approximately 8 1/2 acres 
of land located on South Maple Street in Hadley, 
Massachusetts, described and shown on the plan con- 
tained in the "Report of the Committee for the Pur- 
chase of Agricultural Land" and further described 
in the Appraisal Report of Selwyn H. Graham, dated 
April 29, 1959, (copies of which are on file in the 
Treasurer's Office) for the appraised price of 
$1,800.00, using a portion of the appropriation 
therefor under Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the 
Acts of 1957, provided that the Heirs of Ludwig 
Adamowicz can give a clear title to said property, 
and provided further that the Heirs of Ludwig 
Adamowicz are willing to sell at the aforementioned 
appraised price, and, if not, to take said land by 
eminent domain for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for the use of the University of Massachusetts as 
provided for in said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 
of the Acts of 1957. 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of Trustees, 
to purchase from Michael Chung lo of Hadley, Massa- 
chusetts, approximately 8 1/2 acres of land, located 
on South Maple Street in Hadley, Massachusetts, 
described and shown on the plan contained in the 
"Report of the Committee for the Purchase of Agri- 
cultural Land" and further described in the Appraisal 
Report of Welwyn H. Graham, dated April 25, 1959, 
(copies of which are on file in the Treasurer's Office) 
for the appraised price of $2,000.00, using a portion 
of the appropriation therefor under Item 8258-34 of 
Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957, provided that Michael 
Chunglo can give a clear title to said property, and 
provided further that Michael Chunglo is willing to 
sell at the aforementioned appraised price, and, if 
not, to take said land by eminent domain for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the use of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts as provided for in said 
Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957. 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of Trustees, 
to purchase from Joseph E. Kucinski, of Amherst, 
Massachusetts, two parcels of land of approximately 
37 acres, located off South Maple Street in Hadley, 
Massachusetts, described and shown on the plan con- 
tained in the "Report of the Committee for the Pur- 
chase of Agricultural Land" and further described 
in the Appraisal Report of Selwyn H. Graham, dated 



2125 



Ludwig 
Adamowicz 



Michael 
Chunglo 



Joseph E, 
Kucinski 



2L26 



TRUSTEE 



Joseph R. 
Hebert 



Personnel 
Actions 



Admissions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



April 29, 1959, (copies of which are on file 
in the Treasurer's Office) for the appraised 
price of $2,000.00, using a portion of the 
appropriation therefor under Item 8258-34 of 
Chapter 763 of the Acts of 1957, provided 
that Joseph £. Kucinski can give a clear title 
to said property, and provided further that 
Joseph E. Kucinski is willing to sell at the 
aforementioned appraised price, and, if not, 
to take said land by eminent domain for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the use of 
the University of Massachusetts as provided 
for in said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of 
the Acts of 1957. 

To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
acting for and in the name of the Board of 
8. Trustees, to purchase from Joseph R. Hebert, of 
Amherst, Massachusetts, two parcels of land of 
approximately 37 acres, located off South Maple 
Street in Hadley, Massachusetts, described and 
shown on the plan contained in the "Report of 
the Committee for the Purchase of Agricultural 
Land" and further described in the Appraisal Re- 
port of Selwyn H. Graham, dated April 29, 1959, 
(copies of which are on file in the Treasurer's 
Office) for the appraised price of $2,500.00, 
using a portion of the appropriation therefor 
under Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the Acts of 
1957, provided that Joseph R. Hebert can give 
a clear title to said property, and provided 
further that Joseph R. Hebert is willing to sell 
at the aforementioned appraised price, and, if 
not, to take said land by eminent domain for the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the use of the 
University of Massachusetts as provided for in 
said Item 8258-34 of Chapter 763 of the Acts of 
1957. 

On recommendation by the President and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments and other personnel 
actions included in the list entitled Attach- 
ment A which is attached to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

President Mather discussed fiscal problems confronting the 
University. He recommended that the number of anticipated admissions 
in the academic year 1960-61 be reduced from the projected 7,000 stu- 
dents to a maximum of 6,400 students. This change would necessitate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a revision in the 1961 budget that the Board of Trustees adopted on 
August 4, 1959. Enrollment 



TRUSTEE 



Undergraduate 
Graduate 
Stockbridge (2 year) 

Total 

Full -Time Equivalent 
Summer Students 



Original 
Budget 
5,900 

700 

400 
7,000 



657 



Amended 

Budget 

5,250 

750 

400 

6,400 



657 



Grand Total 7,657 



7,057 



On this basis the entering Freshman Class in 1960 will 
have 100 fewer students than in September, 1959. 

The President stated that the curtailment of enrollment 
is necessary because of 

1. Inadequate support of the existing program due 
to limited state resources. This is documented 
in Statements to the Commissioner of Administra- 
tion and the Budget Commissioner dated July 23, 
1959, and October 15, 1959. 

2. Delay in the design of and appropriations for 
the Addition to the Dining Commons, making it 
impossible to feed more students until the addi- 
tion is completed. (Estimated completion date 
January, 1961) 

3. Because of Items 1 and 2, it has been necessary 
to postpone construction for one year on three 
new dormitories. These will now be ready for 
September, 1961, rather than September, I960. 
After that, new legislative authorization will 
be necessary if the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association is to build additional 
self -liquidating buildings. The dormitories 
will be filled to capacity both in September 
1960 and 1961 with the increased enrollments. 

Upon recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To adopt the revised 1960-61 budget on file in 
the Secretary's Office. 

Upon recommendation of the Treasurer and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 



2127 



Enrollment 



Budget 



2128 



Heads of 
Residence - 
Lyon & Dwight 
Houses 



TRUSTEE 



Master of 
Education 



New 
Course 



New 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To establish the rental of $27.75 per month 
for Heads of Residence in Lyon House and 
Dwight House under the provisions of Chapter 
456 of the Acts of 1958. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That for Master of Education candidates not 
choosing Education 200 (Problem), 34 credits 
will be required for the degree. Nine of these 
34 credits may be transferred from another in- 
stitution. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To approve a new course Philosophy 200 - 

Research and Reading in Philosophy - Inde- 
pendent graduate research on specific topics 
in Philosophy under the supervision of a 
faculty member. 

Prerequisite, graduate status and Credits, 2-6 
permission of instructor. The Staff. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, the following courses were approved: 

Music 5 - Applied Music 

Designed for beginners in vocal or instrumental study. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor Credit 

Music 65, 66 - Applied Music 

Designed to improve musicianship, to create further 
appreciation of music by actual performance, and to meet 
teacher certification requirements. 
Prerequisites: Music 45, 46 Credit 1 

Music 85, 86 - Applied Music 

Designed to conform to graduate school procedures, and 
to introduce students to the newest and constantly changing 
practices of applied music. 
Prerequisites: Music 65, 66 Credit 1 

President Mather discussed the policy and procedure for 

handling United States Department of Defense classified contracts. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To adopt the following policy for classified 
contracts: 



That the following statement of policy and procedure for 
handling United States Department of Defense classified 
contracts is adopted as the official policy of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts dealing with such matters: 

1. Responsibility and authority for the negotiation, 
execution and administration of classified con- 
tracts is assigned to the following officers of 
the University: J. Paul Mather, President; Kenneth 
W. Johnson, Treasurer; John Gillespie, Secretary. 

2. No member of the Board of Trustees of the University, 
except the President of the University, will require 
nor have and can be effectively denied access to 
classified information in the possession of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. These Trustees are: 
Governor Foster W. Furcolo, President of the Board 

of Trustees; Joseph W. Bartlett, Frank L. Boyden, 
Alden C. Brett, Harry D. Brown, William M. Cashin, 
Dennis M. Crowley, J. John Fox, John W. Haigis, Jr., 
Joseph P. Healey, Ernest Hoftyzer, Roland F. 
McDermott, Victoria Schuck, Ralph F. Taber, Philip 
F. Whitmore. 

The above named Trustees, citizens of the United States, 
will in no way participate in the administration and 
technical phases of research contracts with the govern- 
ment; therefore, they will not be in a position to affect 
adversely the performance of such contracts at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. 

Trustee Schuck reported on the annual meeting of the 
Association of Governing Boards. She thanked the Trustees for the 
opportunity of representing the Board at the meetings in Stillwater, 
Oklahoma. 

All of the above votes were unanimous. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



Secretary 



2129 



Policy for 
Classified 
Contracts 




2130 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



Attachment S -) 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
November 3, 1959 



APPOINTMENTS 



AL-MARAYATI, Abid A., Instructor in Government, effective February I, I960 
at $4,316 per year. B.A. Bradley University, 1952; M.A. Bradley University, 
1954; Ph.D. New York University, 1959. Has served as Secretary of the 
Delegation of Iraq and the Delegation of Yemen at the 10th, 11th, 12th, and 
13th sessions of the United Nations General Assembly. 

BEAUPRE, Lawrence, Instructor in Sociology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1959 at $1,438 per year. B.A. University of Massa- 
chusetts. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

FELSHER, Murray, Instructor in Geology (Teaching Associate - 1/4 time), 
effective September 17, 1959 at $1,079 per year. B.S. City College of 
New York. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 



TRANSFER OF APPOINTMENT 

ESSELEN, William B. , Head of Department "A", Food Technology, effective 
July 1, 1960 to Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, to be paid from ICA- 
W-374 funds. This appointment is for one year. Also recommended that 
approval be given to the 10% increase in salary in order for Dr. Esselen 
to accept this assignment. 

MELLEN, William J., Associate Professor ,! A", Poultry, effective July 1, 
1960 to Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, to be paid from ICA-W-374 
funds. It is recommended that approval be given to the 10% increase in 
salary in order for Dr. Mellen to accept this assignment. 

SUMMER COUNSELING PROGRAM 

BARRON, Mrs. Leone, Instructor in English, for extra compensation of $20 
for evaluating freshman essays on July 31. She substituted on this date 
for the originally scheduled reader. While the original reader's name was 
removed from the list, Mrs. Barron's name was not added. 

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT, E-1442 (C3) 

HANSON, John F. , Associate Professor of Entomology, for summer salary in 
the amount of $1,157 for research being conducted under Public Health 
Service Grant during the following periods: June 8- July 10, 1959 and 
July 27 -August 14, 1959. 



APPOINTMENTS FOR G. E. PROGRAM, PITTSFIELD 

* ANGELL, Clarence S., Instructor in Speech, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $214.51. 

* BLOWE, Frank A., Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $377.00. 

* CR00KER, Benjamin C. , Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $264.97. 

** G0RDY, Thomas D. , Associate Professor in Mathematics, first semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $981.51. 

* HACKAMACK, Lawrence C. , Associate Professor of Business Administration, 
first semester of academic year 1959-60 at $1,254.33. 

* HSU, Joseph, Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $823.36. 

* MATHIESON, Alfred H. , Assistant Professor of Physics, first semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $308.57. 

* MORRIS, Bruce R. , Professor of Economics, first semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $1,447.32. 

* 0'DONNELL, Walter G., Professor of Business Administration, first semester 
of academic year 1959-60 at $1,291.33. 

* RIVERS, Robert L, , Associate Professor of Business Administration, first 
semester of academic year 1959-60 at $1,163.50. 

* ROYS, Carl S., Professor of Electrical Engineering, first semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $1,447.32. 



* University of Massachusetts staff member 

# Previously employed on same program 
** New to program 

OTHER ACTIONS 

TAYLOR, L. Lawrence, Head of Department "A" (Controller) (temporary position) 
from Federal Land-Grant Funds to State Funds - 02 - effective November 1, 
1959 at no change in salary. 

TEAHAN, Francis J., Assistant Treasurer (Purchasing Agent) (temporary position) 
from Federal Land-Grant Funds to State Funds - 02 - effective November 1, 1959 
at no change in salary. 




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20, i960, 16 msk& at 



'fro© ftmwfcar 1, 1959 through 

« p*r meek, Athlete frswgfc f»^s 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
November 24, 1959, 1:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Acting Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Cashin, Crowley, 
Fox, Haigis, Healey, Hoftyzer, Kiernan, 
McDermott, McNamara, Schuck, Taber, 
Whitmore, Governor Furcolo; also, Secretary 
Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson; also, Presi- 
dents Charles Cole, Amherst; Father Michael 
P. Walsh, Boston College; Harold C. Case, 
Boston University; Howard B. Jefferson, 
Clark; Nathan M. Pusey, Harvard; Father 
William A. Donaghy, Holy Cross; Julius 
Stratton, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Richard Gettell, Mount Holyoke; 
Asa S. Knowles, Northeastern; Sister Mary 
Alice, Regis; William Park, Simmons; 
Thomas C. Mendenhall, Smith; Margaret Clapp, 
Wellesley; J. Phinney Baxter, Williams; 
Arthur B. Bronwell, Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute, and Dean Clarence Berger, Brandeis. 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Act- 
ing Chairman Boyden called the meeting to order. 

Dr. Boyden said that there is a crisis in public higher 
education in Massachusetts. Once before when there was a crisis the 
college presidents of leading private institutions in Massachusetts 
came together to help solve the problem by setting up the Fort 
Devens branch of the state university. Now the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts are again calling upon the presidents 
of the private institutions to assist them. Dr. Boyden pointed out 
that the University has a problem in recruiting a new president and 
also in making plans to accommodate the increasing number of young 
men and women in need of higher education. It was Dr. Boyden' s hope 
that the private college and university presidents of the Common- 
wealth will be inspired to assist the University in its developing 
program. 



2131 



President 



&XQ <L 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Governor Foster Furcolo said he felt that Massachusetts 
has received a "black eye" because of the publicity the University 
received during the recent struggle in the General Court to get an 
increase in faculty salaries. He urged the group to proceed in 
such a manner that the whole nation will know that we in Massachu- 
setts are trying to do the right thing for public higher education. 
It was the Governor's hope that the presidency of the University 
could be made more attractive and that all things would be 
accomplished to make public higher education in Massachusetts the 
greatest in the nation. 

President Charles Cole of Amherst College said the "black 
eye" that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts got during its recent 
legislative session was well deserved. Dr. Cole expressed his deep 
concern for public higher education in the nation at large and 
mentioned his membership on the Eisenhower committee to study the 
relationship between the state government and public institutions of 
higher learning. He pointed out that a public university cannot be 
run with the same type of centralized control that the state 
exercises over a state prison or other state agency. He said that 
the Freedom Bill for the University of Massachusetts which gave the 
University Trustees a little leeway in the hiring and promotion of 
personnel was only a partial gain. Dr. Cole stated that the 
financial controls exercised by the state government over the Uni- 
versity administration is reflected in such things as the line item 
budget which is, in reality, destructive of public higher education. 
Greater control for the Trustees means increased economy in the 
operation of a university program, Dr. Cole insisted. He described 



TRUSTEE 



2133 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



weaknesses in the tenure system which unduly hampers the University 
administration in developing a good staff. He deplored the 
absentee administrative control exercised by state administrators 
in Boston over the University and asserted that the University of 
Massachusetts has to have more flexibility in its financial ad- 
ministration. It was President Cole's judgment that any candidate 
for the presidency who would take the job under present circumstances 
must be either ignorant or inexperienced. In the past it has been 
very difficult for the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
to recruit a president, some of the presidents having been drafted 
rather than recruited. The University is hamstrung, Dr. Cole 
asserted. He recommended that budgetary and administrative con- 
trols be reduced in order to attract the kind of administrators 
the University needs so that it may fulfill its mission in higher 
education. 



President Cole told the other private college presidents 
that he had two resolutions that he would like them as a group to 
consider and to vote upon. 

President Cole recommended the following resolutions: 

RESOLVED: That it is important to increase 
rapidly and substantially the financial and ad- 
ministrative autonomy of the University of Massa- 
chusetts so that it may have freedom comparable 
to that of the strongest public universities. 

RESOLVED: That without such an increase in 
autonomy it is our considered judgment that it 
will be difficult or impossible now or in the 
future to secure for the University appropriate 
administrative officers or teachers. 



2134 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Pusey of Harvard moved the adoption of the 
resolutions. He underscored Dr. Cole's statement about the need 
for administrative flexibility and pointed out that in reality the 
public and private universities in the Commonwealth are very similar 
He insisted that we shall never have a strong University of Massa- 
chusetts if it is run from Boston. First step - and a necessary 
step - is more autonomy. Educators must make the decisions for 
education. President Pusey wanted to be on record as expressing 
deep concern for the University of Massachusetts. 

President J. Phinney Baxter of Williams College by 
comparative examples showed how financially better off were the 
presidents of other colleges and universities compared to the Presi- 
dent of the University of Massachusetts. He said the financial re- 
wards of the office are important but most important of all a presi- 
dent must have an administrative environment that is conducive to 
effective higher education results. 

Governor Furcolo recognized the validity of many of the 
examples showing the relatively poor position of the University of 
Massachusetts' presidency but emphasized that it takes legislative 
action to improve many of the existing situations. He urged the 
group not to be too pessimistic about the possibility of getting a 
good president, for he felt that the right man would be found for 
the job. 

President Cole reiterated that the hands of the President 
of the University of Massachusetts must be strengthened in his deal- 
ings with the administrative problems that confront an institution 
of higher learning. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Healey stated that there is a need to implement 
the resolutions, and he urged that the group of presidents support 
specific programs that the Board of Trustees will develop, 

Dr. Boyden said he wanted to have another meeting of the 
group of college and university presidents, for he felt that their 
support would add great prestige to any recommendation that the 
Board of Trustees might make. 

Trustee Whitmore emphasized Governor Furcolo's point that 
any changes require legislative action and pointed out the 
attendant difficulties in trying to get the Legislature to agree 
to a program which would give the University more autonomy. 

President Pusey of Harvard stated that the resolutions 
are directed to the General Court. 

The resolutions were unanimously voted. 

Dr. Boyden thanked the college and university presidents 
for coming to the meeting and lending their prestige and support 
to the cause of public higher education in Massachusetts. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 



2135 




Secretary 



2136 



TRUSTEE 



New 
Courses 



Ph.D. Degree 
Program in 
Government 



Provost 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
January 5, I960, 1:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 
Acting Chairman Boyden, presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Cashin, Fox, Healey, Kiernan, 
McDermott, McNamara, S chuck, 
Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather; also, Secretary Gillespie, 
Treasurer Johnson, and Governor's 
representative Lichterman 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Acting 
Chairman Boyden called the meeting to order. 

The minutes of the meeting of November 24 and November 3 
were approved as distributed. 

Trustee Boyden, Chairman of the Committee on Faculty and 
Program of Study reported on committee actions taken at their meet- 
ing on January 5, 1960. 

On recommendation of the committee and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the new courses and deletion of 
courses listed in Attachment A attached to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve a Doctor of Philosophy degree 
program in Government as described in 
Attachment B attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to appoint Dean 
Gilbert L. Woods ide as Acting Provost in 
the event there is a vacancy in that position. 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to appoint as 
new football coach whoever is recommended 
by the screening committee and the appoint- 
ment will be ratified by the Trustees at 
its next meeting. 

Trustee Healey reported on the activities of the Legisla- 
tive Committee. It was the concensus of the committee as well as 
the Board of Trustees that emphasis this year be placed upon in- 
creasing the President's salary and perquisites and obtaining 
optional grades for faculty members of exceptional merit. It was 
agreed that the committee should work toward the establishment of 
a study committee authorized by the Legislature to explore the 
problem of autonomy in administration for the state university. 

Trustee Boyden reported on activity pertaining to the re- 
cruitment of a new president. He stated: 

"Since our last meeting, I have had many conferences with 
members of the Executive Committee, as a Board and indi- 
vidually, with regard to the presidential and legislative 
situation. I have talked with Mr. Mahoney and Mr. Morris sey 
who also have expressed the views of the Governor. I am 
convinced they all are keenly interested, most understand- 
ing, and desire to be cooperative. None has a personal 
candidate. Their only request, which coincides with our 
desire, is that we consider as many qualified candidates 
as possible in order to find the right man. 

"With this end in view, we asked some of the presidents 
of Massachusetts independent colleges to come to a con- 
ference with us and the Governor. The meeting brought 
together a distinguished group of educators who were 
very sympathetic with our problems. After the meeting 
I wrote to each one of them, expressing our appreciation 
of their attendance and stating that 'the Trustees would 
appreciate and will give careful consideration to candi- 
dates whom you suggest as qualified to meet the unusual 
conditions outlined at our meeting last week. ' 

"Of the presidents contacted, eight replied. Their 
letters will be mailed to you and I have written the 
candidates whom they suggested, asking if they were in- 
terested in applying. I am sure that the failure of some 
of the other presidents to suggest candidates was not due 
to lack of interest, because they either in writing or 
personally have assured me of their desire to be of help. 



2137 



Football 
Coach 



President 



2138 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"I also discussed the situation fully with President 
Griswold of Yale, who offered to write to Governor 
Furcolo whom he knew as a Yale alumnus and a former 
student, explaining to him that the list of qualified 
men had been so thoroughly combed in recent years 
that he had no one to suggest to the trustees of other 
colleges who were asking for suggestions, as well as 
to us. 

"In order that we might not be too geographically 
limited I wrote to: President J. E. Wallace Sterling- 
Stanford University, President Harlan H. Hatcher- 
University of Michigan and President Clark Kerr-Uni- 
versity of California asking for qualified candidates. 
A letter has just come in from President Sterling of 
Stanford University, but no word from President Hatcher 
or President Kerr. His letter will also be mailed. 

"I also have written to the following men but as yet 
have had no replies: Henry T. Heald, President, Ford 
Foundation; Dean Rusk, President, Rockefeller Founda- 
tion and John Gardner, President, Carnegie Corporation. 
We have, however, received several nominations from 
them -- letters will be mailed to you. 

"I have also written to the following: Russell I. 
Thackrey, Executive Secretary, American Association 
of Land-Grant Colleges and State Universities; 
Dr. Arthur S. Adams, President, American Council on 
Education and Mr. Charles P. McCurdy, Jr. , Office of 
the Executive Secretary, State Universities Associa- 
tion. Their replies x^ill be mailed, and I have 
written to all the men they suggested. 

"To sum up the situation, we have consulted with 
twenty-one college presidents, four deans at the 
University, three officials of college procedure in 
Washington, and the presidents of the three leading 
foundations. We have also written or seen about 
fifty candidates. Frankly, the number which will meet 
the criteria which we set up is limited. 

"We will mail you a list of candidates whom we have 
contacted and will be glad to send you such informa- 
tion as we have with regard to anyone in whom you 
are interested. 

"We are handicapped at the present, as the Governor told 
us at his office conference, by: 

(1) the unfortunate position in which the University 
and the State has been placed in the minds of 
educators throughout the country because of re- 
cent publicity, 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(2) by the uncertainty as to the salary available, 

(3) by the legislative control of the University, 

(4) by the fact as indicated in President Griswold's 
report that the list of qualified presidential 
candidates is very limited. 

"I hope this will clearly explain the situation to date, 
and while in some ways it seems discouraging, I feel sure 
we will end up with at least six good candidates. I will 
make a later report as soon as we get definite replies 
from those to whom we have written." 

Upon recommendation of the faculty and the President and 

on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To award the degrees to persons listed in 
Attachment C to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate School 

and the President and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award the graduate degrees to the persons 
listed in Attachment D to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

Because all the students completed their work in 1959 for 
the degrees awarded them, they will be considered members of the 
Class of 1959. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment E which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

The President said that because certain administrative 
officers hold academic titles they would receive the larger in- 
creases granted teachers whereas other administrators now in proper 
administrative titles received only the $351 increase granted all 
other state employees. (The practice of having administrative 



111 



Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



2140 



TRUSTEE 



Salary 
Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



personnel in academic titles goes back a great many years and is 
probably a handdown from the practices of early private colleges.) 

The Trustees may correct some of these inequities so that 
administrative officers (except as otherwise budgeted at higher 
salaries) shall all receive only the $351. This can be done under 
the provisions of Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956 (Freedom Bill) 
which provides as follows: "The Trustees shall have complete 
authority with respect to the election or appointment of officers 
and professional staff, including the dismissal, promotion, de- 
motion and transfer, including the assignment of their respective 
ranks and duties within quotas and titles established in the appro- 
priation act by the general court." 

These personnel actions shall take effect on February 28, 
1960, and shall take precedence over and take the place of the 
salary adjustments contained in Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1959 that 
become effective on the same date. This is in line with the intent 
of the General Court in passing Chapter 620 which provides in part 
as follows: "that no change in the job group allocation shall be 
authorized for a position in a class the duties of which, as indi- 
cated by the descriptive specifications on file with the division 
of personnel and standardization, are clearly administrative." 

Unless these adjustments are made on February 28, 1960, 
these individuals will receive larger salary increases that will 
disrupt the administrative organization by permitting higher salary 
increases to some administrators who, largely by chance, happened 
to be in non-administrative state titles. The size of some of these 
increases (up to $1,261 in some cases as against $351 for all 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

others) will place the pay of these positions so far out of line 

with their duties and responsibilities, when compared with the 

other University positions, as to make it virtually impossible to 

correct them by budget action in future years. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make personnel adjustments by placing 
the persons listed on Attachment F into 
the new titles and pay scales on Attach- 
ment F effective February 28, 1960 - such 
attachment to these minutes hereby becoming 
a part of these minutes. 

President Mather discussed the University of Massachusettjs 
- Hokkaido University program. He pointed out that unlike many 
other universities that have ICA contracts with foreign universi- 
ties, the University of Massachusetts is sending only its top 
personnel abroad. The success of the program has been so outstand- 
ing that all participants in the program are anxious to have it 
extended. The President asked that the Board of Trustees approve 
negotiations for an extension of the program for an additional 
four years. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize negotiations for an extension 
of the ICA contract between the University 
of Massachusetts and Hokkaido University 
for an additional four years. 

The President explained that students who are enrolled 
in our Recreation Leadership Program must engage in activity very 
similar to practice teaching in the Education program. Recrea- 
tional people off the campus who participate in practice leadership 
course and who supervise University of Massachusetts students ought 
to be given the same privilege of a waiver of tuition that are 
given to teachers who supervise our practice teaching students. 



6 



1 



Hokkaido 
University 



Recreation 
Leadership 
Course 



2142 



TRUSTEE 



Waiver of 
Tuition 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 



made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That any approved agency which cooperates 
with the Department of Recreation Leader- 
ship for cooperative practice leadership 
training of a student may enroll one member 
of its staff in one course at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts without payment of 
tuition, provided that: 

1. The course may be on either the under- 
graduate or graduate level, consistent 
with the qualifications of the individual; 

2. The course may be in any department of 
the University; 

3. The prerequisites of the course must 
have been met; 

4. The agency representative need not be 
the individual who directly supervised 
the student, but, in multi -departmental 
agencies, must be from the cooperating 
department ; 

5. This privilege is restricted to a one- 
calendar-year period commencing at the 
satisfactory conclusion of the student's 
experience; and 

6. This policy is interpreted to mean 
tuition remission for one course for 
each student trained by the agency. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the Executive 
Committee by mail ballot of November 25, 
1959 by which the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Association was re- 
quested to file legislation for authoriza- 
tion to construct $3,500,000 of dormitories 
and $1,500,000 Dining Hall on a self- 
liquidating basis for use by September 1962. 

Acting Chairman Boyden invited members of the Associate 

Alumni of the University of Massachusetts to join the meeting. 

They included Mr. Richard J. Davis, President; Robert D. Gordon, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Executive Vice-President; Frederick S. Troy and Sumner Z. Kaplan. 
Mr. Davis, speaking for the group, said "the Directors of the 
Associate Alumni of the University of Massachusetts wish to express 
their full approval of the policy of the Governor of the Common- 
wealth and the Board of Trustees in conducting the widest possible 
search for a new President of the University. We believe that at 
this critical period in the history of the University, the office 
requires a man of indisputable excellence. More than at any time 
in the recent past, the University faces an extremely serious 
turning-point. The program of expansion is progressing nearly on 
schedule, but the very complex and subtle problems of maintaining 
quality and obtaining wider academic recognition remain unsolved. 
Indeed, they are made both more urgent and more difficult as ex- 
pansion proceeds. 

"We realize that many other problems exist, including 
complicated matters of organization and political relations that 
require a man of administrative ability, firmness, dignity and 
unfailing tact. It is, however, to the crucial problems of 
quality and excellence that the new President must be ready to de- 
vote his main efforts. What happens here will determine the 
future stature of the University. And because the struggle for 
excellence in education is so much a matter of example and leader- 
ship, the new President must himself be a man of excellence- -not 
only a scholar in his own right, but a man who is broadly-enough 
educated to recognize and support excellence in every field of 
learning. 



2143 



44 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"We therefore pledge our complete support and whatever 
help we are able to provide to the Board of Trustees in their 
most exacting task of finding the right man for the President's 



office. " 



Trustee Boyden on behalf of the Trustees thanked the 



Alumni for their support. 



The meeting adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 




Secretary 



HMENT A 



UNIVERSITY W MASSACHUSETTS 

New Undergraduate Courses 
Deletion of Course® 



Ne w Unde rgraduate Courses 

Education 7? ~ Principle© of School Guidance. The need for Guidance in 
the schools, the nature and principles of .guidance, and an overview of 

an adequate guidance service for a school system* 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Entomology 78 (XI) KeiaBtology . Anatomy, morphology and class if lection 
of plant-parasitic and other soil -inhabiting nematodes. Parasitic re* 

lationships with plants and current control measure® will he stressed. 

1 class hour; 2 2-hour laboratory periods, 3 credits 
Prerequisite, a year of biological science. 

. Electrical Engineering 65 (I) and 66(11) Electronics . These are 

identical to the lecture portion of E.E. 55 and E.E. 36. They are not 
open to Electrical Engineering students. 

3 class hours 3 credits 

Prerequisites, Hethemetics 91 and Physic® 26 or equivalents. 

Forestry 87 CI) and 88 (II).. Selected Problems, Individual work on 

an assigned problem or project in forest management or wood utilisation, 
For qualified juniors and senior®. Total credits for two semesters not 
to exceed 6. 

Hours by arrangement 2»4 credit® 

Mechanical Engineering 92. Electrical Engineering Material®, The 

structure of metals; metallic sol ids ; failure of metallic substances; 
metallic electric and magnetic properties; ultra high-purity; met&ls; 
plastics; ceramics; electrodeposition and welding. 

2 class hours 2 credits 
Prerequisites, Physics 5 g 6, and ?, and Chemistry I 
or equivalent courses. 

Deletion of Courses 

Entomology _5 1 - Pest® of Special €rop§ 

-Forestry,. 51 - Forest 

Maclmnica l Engineering 3? - Materials of Engimefcftisg 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDU M 

From , graduate. Office sD ate . . . December. 17, . 1J5? 

To ... . Mr, vfafcn. Gil^esp^e . 

The Graduate Council recommends to the President and Trustees 
the approval of" a program in Government leading to the Ph D. degree. 
Copies of the proposal as approved by the Graduate Council are en« 
closed* 



The Graduate Council recommends approval of the following new 
courses i 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

200 o SPECIAL PROBLEM.- A study of recent advances and 
current problems in a specialized field of 
electrical engineering. 
Prerequisite, Permission of instructor. Credit, l-3« 

The Staff. 



ENTOMOLOGY 

200, SPECIAL PROBLEM,- Selected research problems in 
entomology. 

Credit, 1-5. 
The Staff. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

200, SPECIAL PROBLEMS.- Selected research problems in 
plant pathology. 

Credit, 1-5. 
The Staff, 



Gilbert L, Woodside 



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AYTACHMENfQ 



MEMORANDUM December, 1959 

From: The Department of Government 

To: The Graduate School* 

Subject: Petition for Permission to Offer the Hi, D. Degree 

The Department of Government wishes to secure the approval of the Graduate 
Council and the Board of Trustees of the University of its proposal to grant the 
ph. D. Degree. If this petition is approved, the Department would like to accept 
students interested in taking work toward the Ph, D. in the fall of I960, although 
it is unlikely that more than one or two students would at that time be pursuing 
work beyond the master* s degree. By the fall of 1961 the number of Ph. D. students 
might increase to four or five, depending upon student demand and other factors in- 
cluding the availability of fellowship assistance. Thus it is the intention of the 
Department during these initial years to restrict the program both in number of 
students and in fields in which the degree is offered. 

We should like to give the degree in two of the six fields of government: (1) 
American Politics and the Legislative Process? (2) Comparative Governments. The 
present faculty of the Department is well qualified by education, teaching, and 
other professional experience to give advanced work and to supervise theses in these 
two areas. The faculty has also done a substantial amount of research and publish- 
ing in both fields. In the American government field Professors George Goodwin 
and John Fenton will bear the main responsibility and will be supported by Professor 
Loren P. Beth whose research interests have been centered in the American government 
field and in the area of constitutional law. Three faculty members have had over- 
seas research experience in the comparative government field and have published in 
this area. 

The need for expanded educational programs to train additional Ph. D. ! s for 
college and university teaching is well established and needs no documentation here. 
Last year we had several applications from prospective students who wished to do 
graduate work for the Ph. D. degree at the University of Massachusetts. Among our 
present group of graduate students there are at least two who hope to go beyond the 
Me A. and qualify for the Ph. D. degree. Other state universities at a somewhat 
similar stage in their development as is the University of Massachusetts - such as 
the University of Connecticut, and the University of Oregon, have recently develop- 
ed Ph. D. programs in government. There are a variety of vocational opportunities 
other than teaching for holders of advanced degrees in government including the 
government service and private research organizations. We anticipate that there will 
be a steady demand for the foreseeable future for people who qualify for the Ph. D. 
in government at the University of Massachusetts. 

During the academic year 1958-59 eleven full-time and four part-time graduate 
students were enrolled in the Department, Eleven students have completed all course 
work and language requirements. One thesis has been completed and all but two others 
are in an advanced stage of preparation (one student is in the Marine Corps and will 
return in February, i960). This semester, eighteen full-time and three part-time 
graduate students are enrolled* 



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The Department expects to offer supporting work in the other four fields of 
goterfcmefti — theory, constitutional law, public administration and interna- 
tional relations. 

The following changes in existing graduate courses or addition of new courses 
are requested. The graduate curriculum at the "200" level will consist of six 
existing courses and eight new courses. 

Courses Open to Graduate Students Only 
(For either major or minor credit.) 

Comparative Governments and Politics : 

Government 290. Comparative Government. - An historical and functional analysis of 
the institutions of government in modern democracies and dictatorships. 
Prerequisite, Government 26. Credit, 3» 

Three class hours. Mr. Allen, Mr. Braunthal, or Mr, Harris. 

(Was Government 1?3) 

Government 291. Comparative Political Parties and Politics. 

- The ideology, structure and dynamics of diverse types of political 
parties, or electoral systems and of party systems in an effort to suggest interrela- 
tionship. 

Credit, 3, 
Three class hours. Mr. Allen,Mr. Braunthal, or Mr. Harris 

(Was Government 174) 

Government 292. Seminar in Comparative Government. - Intensive stucfy of selected 
political systems and of particular governmental institutions and processes. 

Three class Hours Credit, 3. 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Braunthal, or Mr. Harris 
(New course). 

Public Law : 

Government 270. Seminar: Public Law. - A study of selcted topics in public law. 

Prerequisites, Government 64, 65 9 165 or equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Beth 
(This course is already in existence. There are minor changes in the title and course 
description) . 

Government 271. Law and the Political Process. - The inter- relationships between 
law and politics, and the necessity for law in organized societies. 

Prerequisites, Government 64, 65, 165» or equivalent. Credit, 3. 

Mr, Beth 
I No known human society exists without a system of law, and law is often regarded 
as the factor which enables human beings to live in organized groups with a reasonable 
degree of peace, order and harmony. The purpose of this course is to investigate the 
origins of law, the various types of legal systems, and the role which both judge- 
made and statute law have come to play in modem societies (particularly American 
society). This will be done through study of the leading writers on law and juris- 
prudence. Students will be encouraged to develop their own ideas through the study 
of conflicting legal philosophies /) 

(New course> 



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3. 

Political Theory ; 

Government 280. Recent Political Theory. - The major trends of twentieth-century 
political theory will be surveyed; in addition, intensive analysis of selected 
thinkers of this period will be carried out. 

Credit, 3. 

Mr. Tinder 

(This course is designed to acquaint the student with the leading problems which 
have occupied the attention of political philosophers in the present century, as 
well as with the various tendencies of thought to which these problems have given 
rise. Furthermore, the student will be expected to study intensively the works of 
at least one major thinker of present or recent times, or to study the thought de- 
voted to a particular problem which interests him. Among thinkers to be considered 
are the following: John Dewey, Bertrand Russell, Jacques Maritain, Harold Laski, 
R. H. Tawney, and Reinhold Neibuhr). 

(New course) 

Government 281 ft Selected Problems in Political Theory, - An examination of signi- 
ficant problems within the field of political theory. Students will be asked to 
study traditional solutions and to devise original solutions. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. Tinder. 

(This course is proposed in order to allow students not simply to carry on historical 
research in the field of political theory, but also to engage in constructive theore- 
tical effort on their own. This course will be concerned not so much with contem- 
porary problems and thinkers, but with the great classical dilemmas and theoretical 
structures in the history of political theory.) 

(New course.) 

Public Administration ; 

Government 250. Public Administration: Organization. - Behavior within governmental 
bureaucracy, in terms of the interaction between the individual and organization 
influences. 

Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite, Government l6l or 1?8 Mr, Harris or Mr. Mainzer 

(An alternation in the existing course, Government 250). 

Government 251. Public Administration: Responsibility. - Problems of political 
responsibility of government bureaucracy within specific constitutional systems. 

Prerequisite, Government l6l or 1?8. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Harris or Mr. Mainzer 

(New Course.) 



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International Law and delations ; 

Government 260. Problems of International Relations* - Analysis of major problems 
in international relations. 

Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite, Government 153 • Mr, Allen, or Mr, Braunthal. 

(Revision of existing course) 

Government 26l, Problems of International Law and Organization, - Analysis of 
major problems in international organizations. 

Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites, Government 168 or 170, Mr. Allen or Mr, Braunthal, 

(New course). 

American Political Parties and The Legislative Process i 

Government 275, Politics and the Legislative Process. - Selected topics relating 
to American politics, political parties, elections and the legislative process. 

Prerequisite, Government 163 Credit, 3« 

Mr, Fenton and Mr, Goodwin. 
(Existing course) 

Government 2?6, Research in Political Behavior, - Introduction to research tech- 
niques as applied to special problems in the field of political behavior, Etophasis 
upon various approaches to the study of the individual voter, the American politi- 
cian, interest groups and legislature. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. Fenton and Mr. Goodwin 

(These approaches include the anecdotal and ecological; the sample poll? the "panel 
study" and controlled experiments? the model building approach; participant- obser- 
vation, role analysis, and sociometry; case history approach to legislative action; 
the statistical approach to legislative action. Through assigned reading and actual 
application through research projects the student should learn how these techniques 
may be applied and the results which have been obtained through their application,) 

(New course) 

Government 277. Directed Studies in Politics « - The study in depth of a particular 
aspect of political behavior. The content of this course will vary with the par- 
ticular research interests of the instructor and the students. 

Credit, 3. 
Mr. Fenton and Mr, Goodwin, 
( New Course) 



5. 



Government 300. Thesis, Masters Degree Credit, 6. 

Government *K)0. Thesis, Ph. D, Degree Credit, 30. 



Courses Open to Both Graduate and 

Undergraduate Students 
(For either major or minor credit) 

Reference should be made to the Graduate Catalogue, pp. 7^-76( 



GOVERNMENT 
John S, Harris, major advisor 

In addition to the general requirements for the Master of Arts degree, candi- 
dates in Government must possess a reading knowledge of a foreign language approved 
by the department or an adequate knowledge of statistics where appropriate. An 
acceptable master's thesis is also required. 

Study programs for Ph # D, candidates will be determined by the Guidance Com- 
mittees — the designation of fields in political science to be covered and the 
selection of courses in the minor field or fields. 



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6. 



John S. Harris 

Professor and Head of Department 

Education : 

University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia, B. S. in Business Administration, 1939. 
College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, M. A, in Political Science, 1941. 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, M. S. in Public Administration, 1942. 
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, ph. D. in Political Science, 1951, 

Teaching and Other Experience : 

During the past n years taught at the following institutions: - 

University of c i.ncinnati , University of Tennessee, University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Wayne State University, and the University of Massachusetts (since 
September, 1956). 

Budget Assistant, Division of the Budget, State of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, 
1939-1940. 

Assistant State Supervisor, Virginia Property Inventory Project (W. P. A.), State 
of Virginia, 1940.1941. 

Research in Great Britain, 1948-1949. 

Publications : 
Book: 

British Government Inspection As A Dynamic Process: The Local Services and The 
Central Departments (New York: Frederick a. praeger, Inc., 1955) ♦ 

Articles : 

"Central Inspection of Local Police Services in Britain," The Journal of Criminal 

Law. Criminology and Police Science , June, 1954, pp, 85-95. 
"Central Government Inspection of Local Services in Britain," Public Administration 

Review , Winter, 1955, pp. 26-34 
"British Fire Services Denationalized," Minnesota Municipalities , September, 1953, 

pp. 263, 267-68. 
"Television As A Political Issue in Britain", Canadian Journal of Economics and 

Political Science , August, 1955, pp. 328-38. 
"Central Supervision of Local Finance in Britain, Canada, and the United States — A 

Comparative Study," Public Finance - Finance Publiques , May- June, 1956. 
"The Politics of Statehood in America," Parliamentary Affairs , Spring, 1956* 

pp. 140-150, 
"Regional Decentralization of Central Government Departments in Britain," Canadian 

Journal of Economics and Political Science , scheduled for publication in the 

spring issue, 1958. 
PAllegiance Without Citizenship - The American Nationals," Parliamentary Affairs , 

scheduled for publication in the winter issue, 1958. 

Current Research Interests: 

Research interests are concerned primarily with the government and politics of Great 
Britain and Canada. 



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?. 

L^ren P. Beth 

professor of Government - 

Education ; 

Monmouth College , Monmouth, Illinois, A, B. in Political Science, 19^6. 
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, M. A, in Political Science, 1948; Ph. D. 
in Political Science, 19^9. 

Teaching and Other Experience : 

During the past XI yeafcs taught at the following institutions: Bradley University, 
Peoria c Illinois; Harding College, Searcy, Arkansas; University of Florida; 
Senior Fulbright Lecturer, University of Leicester, Leicester, England, 1957- 
1958. 

Publications : 

Books ; 

The American Theory of Church and State . University of Florida Press, 1958. 
The Legislative Process in Florida , (co-author with W.C Havard),to be published by 
the Louisiana State University Press. 

Articles: 

♦Toward a Modern American Theory of Church-State Relationships," Political Science 
Quarterly * December, 1955* 

"Essentiality to Production for Commerce: A Case Studfcr in Statutory Interpretation," 
Missouri Law Review , June, 1955. 

"The Case for Judicial Protection of Civil Liberties," Journal of Politics , Feb, 1955- 

"Group Libel and Free Speech," Minnesota Law Review , January, 1955. 

"The Wall of Separation and the Supreme Court," Minnesota Law Review , February, 1954. 

"The Legion and the Library, " New Republic . July 14, 1952. 
" J McCarthy! sm: Past, Present and Future," South A tlantic Quarterly , April, 1956. 

"Civil Liberties and the U. S, Supreme Court," Political Studies , June, 1958. 

"The White Primary and the Judicial Function in the U, S.,» Political Quarterly , 
Oct. -Dec,, 1958. 

"Justice Harlan and the Uses of Dissent," American Political Science Review, Vol. 
XIIX, pp. 1085-1104, December, 1955. 

"Technical and Doctrinal Aids to Constitutional Interpretation," University of Pitts - 
burgh Law Review , October, 1956. 

^Thoughts on Direct Legislation," Social Science , December, 1957. 

"Judge into Justice", South Atlantic Quarterly , October, 1959. 

Current Research Interests : 

The States and civil liberties. 

The judicial opinions of Justice Cardozo. 

Factors in selection and background of state supreme court justices. 

Jo hn H. Fenton : 
Professor of Government - 



Education: 

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, A. B. t 1948; M.A., 1951 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Ph.D. in Political Science, 1956. 



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John H. Fenton -(continued, .♦....) 

8, 

Teaching and Other Experience ; 

Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1955-1957. 

Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 1957-1959. 

Budget Analyst, State of Kentucky, 19^9-1951. 

Head, Management Services Department, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, 1951-1953 

Publications : 

Book: 



Politics in the Border States , Hauser Press, 1957. , 

■ ■ 

Articles : 

:, Negro Registration in Louisiana," American Politicsl Science Review, September, 

1957. (With Kenneth Vines). 
"Negro Votes in Louisiana," Journal of Negro Education , Negro Yearbook, Summer, 1957. 
"For Cleaner Elections, " National Municipal Review , September, 1958. 
"Urbanism and the Negro in Louisiana," Louisiana Academy of Sciences , Louisiana State 

University, 1957. 
"Rural-Urban Factionalism in Michigan," a chapter in a book to be edited by Charles 

M. Hardin entitled Rural-Urban Factionalism in the Midwest . 
"The Right- to-Work Vote in Ohio, " Midwest Journal of Political Science , August, 1959. 

Current Research Interests; 

Comparative state politics. 

George Goodwin, Jr . 

Associate Professor of Government 

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Education : 

Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, B. A, in Political Science, 19^5 « 
Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, M. A. in Political Science, W9. 
Ph. D. in Political Science, 1955. 

Teaching and Other Experience : 

University of Massachusetts, 19^8, to date. 

Publications : 

"Intermunicipal Cooperation in Massachusetts," a 25 page study published by the 

Bureau of Governmental Research, University of Massachusetts. 
"The Seniority System in Congress," American Political Science Review , June, 1959- 

Current Research Interests : 

Congressional Committees and majority rule. 



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9. 

Luther A. Allen 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Education 

Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, A. B., 19^1* 

State University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, M. A. in Political Science, 19^2. 

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Ph. D. in International Relations, 1955. 

Teaching and Experience : 

University of Delaware, 1950-1952 ♦ 
University of Massachusetts, 1952 to date. 

P ublications : 

"The French Left and Soviet Russia: Origins of the Popular Front." 

The World Affairs Quarterly , July, 1959. 
"The Renovation That Failed: Mendes-France, the Organization of the Radical Party 

and the Republic," Western Political Quarterly , to be published probably in ! 60, 

Current Research Interests : 

The government and politics of France. 

Gera rd Braunthal 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Education 

Queens College, New York City, B. A. in Political Science, 19^7. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, M, A. in Political Science, 19**8» 

Columbia University, New York, New Yorkj Ph. D. in Political Science, 1953 ♦ 

Teaching and Other Experience : 

Intelligence, U. S, Air Force, Civilian, Germany, 1950-1952. 
Research Assistant, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1953-195**. 
University of Massachusetts, 195*+- to date. 

University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany, Fulbright Lecturer, 1959-1960 (on leave 
from University of Massachusetts). 

Publications : 

"The German Free Trade Unions During the Rise of Nazism," Journal of Central Europea n 
Affairs . January, 1956, 

"West German Trade Unions and Rearmament," Political Science Quarterly , March, 1958, 

"Direct and Representative Democracy in West Germany: The Atomic Armament Issue," 
Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science . August, 1959* 

"The Free Democratic Party," Western Political Quarterly , to appear in Winter, I960. 

"European Socialist Movements," a chapter in Ideologies in the Modern World , ed, Jo- 
seph Roucek, Philosophic Library, Spring, I960. 



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10. 

Gerard Braunthal (continued. ..••••••••••) 

C urrent Research Interests ; 

German politics including the study of interest groups. 

Glenn Tinker 

Ass istant Professor of Government 

Education: 

Pomona College, Pomona, California, B, A. in Political Science, 19^3. 

Claremont Graduate School, Claremont, California, M. A, in Political Science, W, 

University of California, Berkeley, California, Ph. D. 1952. 

London School of Economics and Political Science, London, England, Fall, 1957. 

Teaching and Other Experience : 

University of Massachusetts, 1952 to date. 

Publications ; 

"Human Estrangement and the Failure of Political Imagination," Review of Politics . 
October, 1959. 

Current Research Interests : 

Theory of international relations. 

Le-wis C» Mainzer 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Education : 

New York University, New York City, B. A. in Government, 19**8. 
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, M # A, in Political Science, 1950. 
Ph. D. in Political Science, 1956. 

r eaching and Ot her Experience 

University of Massachusetts, 195^ to date. 

Publications ; 

"Political Implications of Adult Education, tt Educational Record , July, 1953. 
"Science Democratized; Advisory Committees on Research," Public Administration Revi ew 
Autumn, 1958, 

Cureent Research Interests : 

Government and science, interest group theory, administrative theory. 



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11. 

A ssociate Faculty 

There are a number of distinguished professors of government at Amherst, Mt. 
Holyoke and Smith Colleges who could make significant contributions directing 
theses and dissertations in their respective areas of academic specialization. 
Several faculty members from the other Valley Colleges have during recent years taught 
taught courses on the university campus. 



U niversity Personnel Who Teach in the Department ; 



William O'Hare, Director 
Bureau of Government Research 



Gerald Grady, Assistant Director 
Bureau of Government Research 



Fred V. Cahill, Dean 
College of Arts and Sciences 



MEMORANDUM 

October 5, 1959 

FROM: John S # Harris, Head, Department of Government 

TO: Dean Gilbert S. Foodside 

SUBJECT: Prerequisites for "200" level courses in Ph # D. proposal, 

I should like to recommend the following prerequisites for the "200" 
level courses set forth in our Ph # D, proposal: 
Comparative Government and Politic s 
Government 290, Comparative Government 
Prerequisite, nine hours in Government 

Government 291, Comparative political Parties and Politics 
Prerequisite, nine hours in Government 

Government 292, Seminar in Comparative Government 
Prerequisite, nine hours in Government 

Public Law 
Government 270, Seminar in Public Law 

Prerequisite, Government 6k or l6f> or equivalent 

Government 271, Law and the Political Process 
Prerequisite, Government 61* or 165 or equivalent 

Political Theory 
Government 280, Recent Political Theory 
Prerequisite, Government 171 or 172 or equivalent 

Government 281, Selected Problems in Political Theory 
Prerequisite, Government 171 or 172 or equivalent 

Public Administration 
Government 250, Public Administration: Organization 
Prerequisite, Government l6l or 178 or equivalent 

Government 25l, Public Administration: Responsibility 
Prerequisite, Government 161 or 178 or equivalent 

International Law and Relations 

Government 260, Problems of International Relations 
Prerequisite, Government 153 or equivalent 

Government 261, Problems of International Law and Organization 
Prerequisite, Government 168 or 170 or equivalent 

American Political Parties and the Legislative P rocess 
Government 275, Politics and the Legislative Process" 
Prerequisite, Government 163 or equivalent. 

The Curriculum Committee agreed that the two remaining "200" level 
courses, Government 276 and 277 do not require prerequisites, 

I greatly appreciate the interest of the Council in this matter* 

Sincerely yours, 

JOHN 3. HARRIS, HEAD 
JSH:vcg DEPAREOTT OF GOVERNMENT 



'MTtACMMmfC 



DEGREES AWARDED NOVEMBER 3, 1959 
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Judith Ann Abrams 



Cum Laude 
Rite 



Stephanie Adele Bonnivier 
Jeanne Ardys Bryson 
Dorothy Louise Colby 
Robert Carl Cole, Jr. 
David James Cullen, Jr. 
Louise Helen Fish 
Robert Charles Geryk 
Barbara Jean Grover 
Alice Jean Littlewood 

Joan Ann Thimot 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 
Leo Michael Cassidy 
Sydney G. Chap in 
Raymond Joseph Cormier 
Robert Arthur DesRochers 
Joan Mary Dyleski 

Lawrence David Sangermano 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Harold Kenneth Grant 



Rite 
Gerard Francis McNeil 



Erwln Donald Mahan 



Sylvia Simoneau Lupien 
Paul F. Mahoney 
David Leroy Mann 
Joan Frances O'Brien 
H, Robert Passolt 
Robert Gilbert Prentiss 
Emil Salzberger 
Stephen Howard Sanf ield 
Mary Mabel Skiff ingt on 



Charles Jason Herman 
Donaid RirChard HiH#r 
Allan George Hlavac 
Carl Lee Howard 
Frederick Joseph Mitchell 



Malcolm Joslin McFarlin 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Rite 



Richard David Alman 
Russell William Bevan 
Daniel Darius Darling 
William Edward Donahue 
Paul Revere Knight III 



Frederick Hervey Law 
Milton Lebowitz 
Paul Francis Lynch 
Samuel Richard Mascitti 
John Donald Shannon 
Richard Edward Waldron 



ATTACHMENT V 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Fall 1959 

MASTE R OF AR TS 

Raymond Louis Ca sella 

Richard Franklin Moss 

Young Hwa Park 

MASTER OF ARTS IF TEACHIN G 

Nancy Ji# Rogers 
Francis Morgan Stoughton 

FASTER OF EDUCATION 

Jayne Crean 
Donald Edward Geer 
Lucille Pa Grogan 
Kenneth George Hewitt 
James Herbert King, Jr» 
Anne C. Simone 
Barbara Ann Zalot 

FASTER OF SCIENCE 

Krystyna Janina Kowalska 
Max Dressier Lechtman 

Edward S» Pira 
Alphonse Albert Plaza 

FASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Raymond Alfred Robillard 
Donald Keyes Whynott 

DOCT O R OF P HILOSOPHY 

C« Ikx^rell Martin Food Technology 

William David Tunis Entomology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Personnel Actions 
January 5, 1960 



APPOINTMENTS 



CATALDO, Charles, Instructor tn Sociology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 tine), 
effective November 15, 1959 at $1,438.66 per year for second semester only. 
B.A. Boston College, 1958. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

CHOUDHURY, Razia Khanam, Instructor in Physics (Teaching Associate - 1/2 time), 
effective January 31, 1960 at $2,158 per year. B.Sc. Dacca University, 1954; 
M.Sc. University of Karachi, 1958. From September to December, 1955, she was 
a lecturer in Physics and Mathematics at APWA Science College, Karachi; from 
January 1956 to February 1958 she was a demonstrator in Physics at Central 
Government College for Women in Karachi and from 1958 to date she has been with 
the C.G.O. Government (Pakistan) Ministry of Defense in Karachi. 

RATHJENS, Donald, Instructor in Sociology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective January 31, 1960 and not to exceed 26 weeks at $1,438.66 per year. 
B.A. Drew University, 1958. Presently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

WOOD, Philip, Instructor in Sociology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), effective 
January 31, 1960 and not to exceed 26 weeks at $1,438.66 per year. He will re- 
ceive the B.A. degree in February 1960 from the University of Massachusetts and 
has already been admitted to the Graduate School. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

CHAPMAN, George Bunker, Associate Professor of Biology "A", effective 
September 1, 1960 at $9,828 per year (maximum). B.A. , M.A. and Ph.D. Princeton 
University, 1950, 1952 and 1953. Assistant in Instruction at Princeton, 1950- 
52; Research Biologist, RCA Laboratories, Princeton, 1953-56; Research Assistant, 
Princeton, 1953-54; Research Associate Princeton, 1954-56; Assistant 
Professor, Harvard, 1956 to date. 

CLIFFORD, Oliver, Instructor in Physics (% time), effective November 8, 1959 
and through the fall semester, 1959-60 at $2,470 per year (3 steps above 
minimum). B.A. Bates College, 1939. He has taught Mathematics and Physics 
at the Amherst Regional High School since 1940. 

SCHWARTZ, Petee Beth, Instructor in Mathematics, effective January 31, I960 
and not to exceed 26 weeks at $4,940 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. 
Hunter College, 1956; M.A. Emory University, 1958. She has been studying at 
the University of Maryland from September, 1957 to the present time and is a 
replacement for Dr. Wagner who is on sabbatical leave. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

GOLDBERG, Maxwell H. , Head of Department of English from September 1, 1960 to 
August 31, 1961. 

LEVINE, Arnold, Instructor in Sociology from February 1, 1960 to August 31, 
1961. 



:.'.* 



2. 

MASIOMAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 

This is extra compensation for teaching done after the normal work week. 
Classes are scheduled and taught from 5:00 p.m. on during Monday through 
Friday, and Satu*^ay morning of eacJ* week. This does not interfere with the 
normal work load of these teachers. 

ANDERSEN, Allen E. , Head, Department of Mathematics, to be paid $500 as Director. 

GENTILE, Arthur C. , Assistant Professor of Botany, to be paid 1/6 time, for 
first semester at $1,001. 

M0SER, Donald E. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, to be paid $866.12 
during second semester. 

PUTALA, Eugene C. , Assistant Professor of Botany, to be paid $1,112.21 during 
second semester. 

RICHAS0N, George R. , Associate Professor of Chemistry, to be paid \ x 1/6 
time, for first semester at $627.25. 

RICHAS0N, George R. , Associate Professor of Chemistry, to be paid $677.08 
during second semester. 

WAGNER, Robert W. , Professor of Mathematics, to be paid 1/8 time, for first 
semester at $1,085.50. 

ZAJICEK, Oliver T. , Instructor in Chemistry, to be paid \ x 1/6 time, for 
first semester at $446.33. 

ZAJICEK, Oliver T. , Instructor in Chemistry, to be paid $473.40 during second 

semester. 

ADDITIO N AL COMPENSATION 

LEGER, Leo, part-time Instructor in Men's Physical Education for the period 
November 4, 1959 through March 12, I960, a period of 16 weeks, 30 hours per 
week @ $2.00 per hour - $960 - 03 funds. 

LITTLE, Henry N. , Professor of Chemistry, to receive $80.50 per week for a 
period of 52 weeks for the period September 1, 1959 through August 31, 1960. 
This is a grant from the Institute of Public Health (No. A3526BBC(1)) during 
sabbatical leave of Professor Little. 

MYERS, Jerome, Assistant Professor of Psychology, to work as Investigator on 
Contract N61339-583, 1350-21-03 on the following days: December 19, 21, 22, 
23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 1959 at the rate of $31.20 per day. 

PURNELL, Mrs. Ethel, part-time Instructor in Women's Physical Education to 
teach 9 hours (3 sections a week) @ $2.50 per hour; total for the year 240 
hours - $600 - 03 funds. 



1 



I 



3. 

APPOINTM E NTS FOR G. E> PROGRAM. PITTSFIELD 

* ANDERSON, John W. , Associate Professor of Accounting, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $1,163.49. 

* ANGELL, Clarence S. , Instructor in Speech, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $214.51. 

* BARRON, Mrs. Leone, Instructor in English, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $823.36. 

* BARRON, Leon 0., Assistant Professor of English, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $809.25. 

* BLOWS, Frank A., Instructor in Physics, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $377.00. 

** BRAGDON, Harrison, Instructor in Mathematics, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $359.66. 

* CR00KER, Benjamin C. , Instructor in Physics, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $463.66. 

* GILLESPIE, John, Professor of Government, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $1,085.49. 

* HARDY, Harold E. , Professor of Marketing, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $1,447.32. 

* HOWARD, Marshall C. , Associate Professor of Marketing, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $1,254.43, 

* LEAHY, John, Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $591.51. 

* LITTLEJOHN, Lyance G. , Jr., Instructor in Physics, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $591.51. 

* LUDTKE, James B. , Associate Professor of Business Finance, second semester 
of academic year 1959-60 at $1,254.48. 

** MARKS, Louis W. , Instructor, second semester of academic year 1959-60 at 
$788.60. Will teach Mathematics. 

** McNUTT, William, Instructor in Mathematics, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $359.66. 

* McQUADE, James M. , Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $539.49. 

* MATHIESON, Alfred H. , Assistant Professor of Physics, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $539.50. 

* M0HN, John W. , Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, second 
semester of academic year 1959-60 at $1,254.48. 

* O'DONNELL, Walter G., Professor of Industrial Administration, second 
semester of academic year 1959-60 at $1,291.35. 



f 






4, 
A P£Oiro iEpS FOR G, B. PROGRAM. PITTSFIELD (continued) 

* PHINNEY, Arthur B. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $834.00. 

* PRUYNE, Granville S. , Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $591.51. 

* ROYS, Carl S, , Professor of Electrical Engineering, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $1,447.32. 

* SAVEREID, S. Jay, Assistant Professor of Speech, second semester of 
academic year 1959-60 at $240.50. 

* S0BALA, Daniel, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, second 
semester of academic year 1959-60 at $906.81. 

* University of Massachusetts staff member 

* Previously employed on same program 
** New to program 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of October, November, December, 1959 and January and February, 1960, 

EMERITUS 

ROBERTS, Oliver C. , Associate Professor of Pomology, Emeritus, effective 
January 31, 1960. 






I 



9^0 s :rom ICA 



i&wtmmffl: mow minimum 



VQBEXft&NQER, Martin J» ff Instructor in Sociology,, 



;tive Fel 



st $4,732 per yaar (2 sfc@f*p ibove minlmm) > &*A« College of the 
!few York s&nd at present is & FSi.B. candidate -«t Columbia 
hfto taught on a part»tims m& full-tisifc basl^ for the last fiv 
C«C.H.Y. «»4 Hunter €©ll©ge im New York City, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

February 23, 1960, 1:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Acting Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Healey, 
McDermott, McNamara, Pumphret, 
Schuck, Whitmore, President 
Mather; also, Secretary Gillespie, 
Budget Commissioner Morrissey and 
Governor's representative Lichterman 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with and in the absence of the Chairman, Act- 
ing Chairman Boyden called the meeting to order. 

The minutes of the meeting of January 5, 1960 were 
approved as distributed. 

Acting Chairman Boyden appointed a Nominating Committee: 
Whitmore, Chairman, Crowley and Brett. 

Dr. Boyden reported on what the Executive Committee had 
been doing pertaining to recruiting a president. He explained that 
preliminary screening is constantly going on and until the General 
Court sets the new salary and other perquisites of the job, it 
would be difficult to make any firm decisions concerning the 
nominees . 

Dr. Boyden said, "The Board of Trustees authorized the 
Executive Committee at the meeting of September 19, 1959 to seek 
candidates for the office of President and to report to the next 
Board meeting on November 3, 1959. Because of our realization that 
we faced many complex problems in the selection, we sought the ad- 
vice and assistance of Governor Foster Furcolo in eliminating the 
most vexing hazard to our progress in filling the post, namely, 



21 



Nominat ing 
Committee 



President 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



that of the unrealistic salary that we had to offer. As you recall, 
he graciously offered to use his influence as Chief Executive of 
the Commonwealth to secure for us legislation that would enable us 
to offer a salary of Twenty-five Thousand Dollars to the man that 
we select for the Presidency. With the assistance of the Governor, 
we were able to assemble a distinguished company of seventeen 
college presidents, who met with this Board on November 24, 1959. 
Although the presidents were most helpful in their advice and 
support of every measure that will strengthen our University, they 
generally expressed the sound opinion that this Board of Trustees 
must ultimately make the selection of the President and therefore 
should completely control the recruitment and interviewing of 
candidates for the position. 

"Since the meeting with the presidents on November 24, 
1959, we have been engaged on a twofold task in fulfilling the 
mandate of this Board. First, we have had a very active representa- 
tion at the State House by the Special Committee on Legislation, 
composed of Judge J. John Fox, Mr. Joseph P. Healey and Mr. Philip 
F. Whitraore. Their wisdom in the field of politics has resulted in 
bringing together our many old friends in the Legislature and pre- 
senting the case for a salary increase as ably as it could be pre- 
sented by any group that we could engage. Governor Furcolo 
vigorously recommended the Twenty-five Thousand Dollar salary, and 
we are hopeful that the Committee on Education will report his 
recommendation favorably. This salary matter must be carried 
through the legislative steps, and we can well be pleased that we 

have such excellent representation in that work. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"With your approval, we would like to start on the next 
step in filling the Presidency. I believe that we are far enough 
along on the legislative path for us to write encouragingly to per- 
sons now on our lists, or to persons hereafter added to the list of 
potential candidates for the Presidency telling them that we hope 
to offer a salary of Twenty Thousand Dollars or better, with a 
house and certain expenses provided. All persons interviewed will 
be told that an acceptance by one of them may be made contingent 
upon our being able to offer an acceptable salary. Governor Furcolc 
has made available Five Thousand Dollars, and perhaps more if 
necessary, for transportation expenses of candidates for the 
position. We are now ready to invite some of the candidates to 
meet with our selection committee. This committee will attempt to 
screen and make recommendations to the full Board. It is our ex- 
pectation that we will invite several of the candidates to return 
and meet the Full Board at a later date. I shall call upon the 
Secretary of the University as Secretary of this Board to help me 
in clearing the heavy correspondence that will now be involved, and 
will give him full authority to keep all our proceedings confidently 
within the Board." 

Mr. Morrissey, speaking on behalf of the Governor, said 
that any obstacles the committee meets in extending its widest 
possible search for presidential candidates, the Governor will bend 
every effort to overcome. The Governor feels that now in Massa- 
chusetts the climate for higher public education is good. This is 
indicated by the support the private educators have given it. The 
presidents of private educational institutions have given their 



2147 



2148 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
undivided support for university autonomy and legislative leaders 
pledged their support to obtaining an increase in the president's 
salary. All these factors indicate to the Governor a growing in- 
terest on the part of the citizenry toward the University of 
Massachusetts. 

As to the technique for screening the candidates for 
president, Dr. Boyden proposed the following: the Executive 
Committee will suggest a list of qualified candidates who show a 
decided interest in the job. This will be determined by writing 
the candidates and ascertaining their attitude toward the position. 
The Executive Committee will then screen the list to ten names. 
The names and biographical material on the ten will be submitted to 
the Board of Trustees who will suggest three from the list to be 
brought to the campus for an interview. The Trustees agreed to 
this procedure. 

President Mather announced that this would be his last 
annual meeting and he spoke briefly about the problems that the 
Board of Trustees will be confronted with in the years ahead. He 
pointed out the population pressures are continuing to build up 
and that expansion at the University of Massachusetts must continue 
He deplored the continuing tendency of the Legislature to vote 
quite readily money for capital outlay and as against their re- 
luctance to appropriate enough money for the operating budget. He 
told the Trustees that the hiring of an adequate staff, the buying 
of an adequate number of books and educational supplies and the 
improving the salary of the University administrators remain the 
most crucial problem confronting the University. He suggested that 
the auxiliary enterprises on the campus such as the operation of 



2149 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
the Boarding Halls and operation of the Infirmary ought to be 
placed on a trust fund operation rather than remaining a budgetary 
item to be voted by the Legislature. He urged the Trustees to main- 
tain the high standards that have always been associated with the 
University. He declared that political patronage and quality 
education are antagonistic. The President said the problems of se- 
lecting students for the University of Massachusetts are unlike 
those of many other states where a much larger percentage of the 
population can be accommodated. If the University does not continue 
to increase the size of its student body as a constant ratio to the 
expanding population, the political pressures for special treatment 
of some student applicants will increase substantially. 

The President thanked the Board of Trustees for their 
support through the years and he pledged his continued interest in 
the University of Massachusetts. 

The President also announced that Secretary of State 
Herter sends his personal greetings to the Board of Trustees and 
his thanks for awarding him an honorary degree and permitting it 
to be conferred upon him at his office in Washington. 

Dr. Boyden expressed the deep appreciation of the Board of 
Trustees for the great service that President Mather rendered to 

the University. 

President Mather said the refusal of the Legislature to 
provide sufficient help to operate our constantly expanding feeding 
operations, together with cuts in our food budget requests, have 
resulted in a surplus of income which cannot be justified in a 
supposedly non-profit operation. Last year board rates were raised 



Board Rate 



Feeding 
Students 



50 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

fifteen cents a day in anticipation of slightly higher food costs 
and wages. The University did not receive a sufficient food 
budget or adequate personnel, and the result was a clear profit of 
$75,000 above all direct and indirect charges that could be 
attributed to the food operation. 

This year the situation is even more pronounced. There 
are 500 more feeders than last year and a shortage of 14 employees 
against 8 last year. Indications are that last year's profit will 
be doubled. Public knowledge of this profit, which cannot be 
avoided, could result in a very embarrassing situation for the 
University and result in serious repercussions with the student 



body. 



Immediate steps should be taken to reduce our board 



charges more in line with actual costs, the President said, and it 

is recommended that the weekly rate of meal tickets for the second 

semester only be reduced from $10.25 to $8.75. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To reduce the board charges for the second 
semester only from $10.25 to $8.75 and to 
refund the difference. 

Trustee Schuck challenged the validity of the report of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee and the Finance Committee claim- 
ing the absence of a quorum at both committee meetings. She pointed 
out that the Commissioner of Administration is to hold a meeting of 
the Trustees soon to consider the total building picture at the 
University and she suggested that any action on building plans be 
deferred until after that meeting. 



i 



TRUSTEE 



2151 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Brett, Chairman of the Finance Committee, announced 
that since the question of the validity of the Finance Committee 
meeting was challenged that he would make the recommendations as an 
individual rather than as Chairman of the Finance Committee. 

On recommendation of Trustee Brett and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To confirm the action of the President in 
accepting on December 31, 1959 a gift of 
an additional 16 acres of land in Blendon 
Township, Franklin County, Ohio (near 
Columbus) , adjacent to the land already 
held by the Trustees from Murray D. and 
Anne H. Lincoln and to authorize that 
this land be placed in the Murray D. 
Lincoln Endowment Fund at $33,600 (1957 
appraised value of $2100 per acre) . 

It was 



VOTED ; To authorize Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to sign an amendment to the lease with 
Murray D. Lincoln to include the additional 
16 acres of land under the same terms and 
conditions as the existing lease. 

It was 

VOTED : To accept the gift of $753.00 from the 
New England Feedmen Association for the 
establishment of a student loan fund. 
That the gift of $753.16, and any future 
donations, of the New England Feedmen 
Association be accepted and that a trust 
fund be established entitled, "The New 
England Feedmen Association Loan Fund". 
In accordance with the terms of the gift, 
loans are to be made out of this fund to 
undergraduate and graduate students at 
the University majoring either in the 
area of poultry, dairy, or animal science. 
No interest is to be charged if the stu- 
dent repays his loan by the maturity date. 
Any unpaid balance after maturity is to 
bear interest at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Except for the conditions spelled out above, 
this loan fund is to be administered in 
accordance with the procedures and policies 
established by the faculty committee on stu- 
dent loans. 



Lincoln, 
Murray D. 
Anne H. 



New England 
Feedmen 
Association 
Student 
Loan Fund 



21 



TRUSTEE 



Auditor 1 s 
Report 



University 
Fund 



Hampshire 
Inter -Library 
Center, Inc. 



Research . 
Corporation 



Patents on 
Inventions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Brett said that members of the Committee on Finance 
reviewed the State Auditor's Report for the period July 1, 1958 to 
June 30, 1959. It was the consensus that the audit report was 
generally fair and points of criticism and answers in the report by 
the Treasurer were studied. Members of the committee did not 
recommend any action on the part of the Board of Trustees. 

Because of increased expenditures attending the Presi- 
dent's Office, Trustee Brett recommended and motion was duly made 
and seconded and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to spend for the 
furtherance of the University program such 
additional funds to those authorized on 
August 4, 1959 from the University Fund not 
to exceed $2,500 as in his discretion are 
necessary through June 30, 1960. 

Upon recommendation of Trustee Brett and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 

Johnson, to enter into an agreement between 
the University of Massachusetts and the 
Hampshire Inter-Library Center, Inc. for 
educational services at a sum of $4,000 
payable from subsidiary account 03 for the 
period July 1, 1959 to June 30, 1960 with 
provision for extension from year to year. 

Trustee Brett discussed the need for a patent policy for 

the University. Upon his recommendation and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to enter into a contract with Research Corpora- 
tion, a non-profit foundation, 405 Lexington 
Avenue, New York 14, New York for the administra- 
tion of patents on inventions offered to them by 
the University and its faculty. It provides that 
the inventor shall receive 15% of gross income, 
and that the University and Research Corporation 
will share equally in any net income after Research 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Corporation's costs are met. It provides 
further that Research Corporation will 
meet all costs of patents that it ad- 
ministers so that there will be no expense 
to either the inventor or the University. 
A form of the agreement is on file in the 
Treasurer ' s Off ice . 

Secretary Gillespie announced that the Staples Estate, a 

recent gift to the University, has been settled. On his recommenda-J 

tion and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to pay the bill of $680.74 to 
Jones, Day, Cockley and Reaves for 
settling the Staples Estate. 

The total remaining from the Staples Estate is $50,994.27 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To change the name of the Department of 
German to the Department of German and 
Russian. 

Trustee Whitmore said that the Board of Trustees at a 

meeting on October 11, 1958 received a report from the faculty 

board for naming buildings which recommended that the Liberal Arts 

Building be named the Joseph Warren Bartlett Hall in honor of the 

Chairman of the Board. The Trustee Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds also recommended it. At that time, Dr. Bartlett declined 

the honor even though there was a unanimous expression in favor by 

all members of the Board of Trustees present. Mr. Whitmore 

recommended and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To name the Liberal Arts Building the 
Joseph Warren Bartlett Hall in honor 
of Trustee Bartlett. 

Trustee Whitmore requested that the name of the Walter M. 
Dickinson Armory be changed to Walter M. Dickinson Hall. He pointec 



2153 



Staples, 

Emily M. Estate 



Department of 
German & Russia 



Joseph Warren 
Bartlett Hall 



21<5"4 



TRUSTEE 



Walter M. 
Dickinson Hall 



Sewer System 
Contract 



Water System 



Western Mass. 
Electric Co. 

Mt. Lincoln 



Personnel 
Actions 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

out that the building which will house the ROTC units is more than 

an armory for it contains an Air Force unit. Because most of the 

academic buildings are designated as halls, Trustee Whitmore said 

the new ROTC building should also be so designated as a hall. On 

his recommendation and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To rename the new ROTC building the 
Walter M. Dickinson Hall. 

On recommendation of Mr. Whitmore and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 
to enter a sewer payment contract for the 
State's share of the expansion of the 
sewer disposal plant on behalf of the 
Board of Trustees between the Board of 
Trustees, University of Massachusetts and 
the selectmen of the Town of Amherst. A 
copy of the contract is appended in Attach- 
ment A attached to these minutes and here- 
by made a part of these minutes. 

Mr. Whitmore announced that a water supply study made by 
Whitman and Howard has designated four recommended sources of water 
for the University of Massachusetts. He recommended that the re- 
port be filed for use in case the Town of Amherst in the future 
should not be able to furnish an adequate supply for the campus. 

On recommendation of Mr. Whitmore and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve a payment of $192.00 to the 
Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
for electric service at Mt. Lincoln. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions and other 
personnel actions included in the list entitled 
Attachment B which is attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Mather announced because of directive from the 

Division of Personnel and Standardization following the Trustee 

meeting of January 5, 1960 affecting the application of Chapter 

620, Acts of 1959 to certain personnel at the University, action 

taken at the January 5, 1960 meeting would have to be rescinded. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To rescind the action of the Board of 
Trustees of January 5, 1960 which made 
personnel adjustments by placing the 
persons listed on Attachment F of the 
January 5, 1960 minutes into the new 
titles and pay scales on attachment F 
effective February 28, 1960. 

The President announced that it was necessary to make 
personnel adjustments for 18 persons working for the University in 
order to conform to the provisions of Chapter 620 of the Acts of 
1959. He stated that it was determined that the incumbents of the 
positions listed have administrative duties and, therefore, are 
entitled only to $351 increase as set forth in Chapter 620, the Acts 
of 1959. The personal adjustments with the two exceptions noted 
below were determined as follows: The incumbent retains the exist- 
ing title. If the incumbent is at the maximum in the old salary 
scale, he receives $351 increase with no additional step increases 
allowed. If the incumbent is under the maximum in the old salary 
scale, he receives $351 increase, step increases in the old salary 
scale will be paid as earned until maximum of the old salary scale 
plus $351 is reached. Robert S. Hopkins has a change in title from 
Professor "A", U of M in the old salary scale with a $9,828 maximum 
to Dean of Men, U of M - new salary scale at $10,387 maximum. 



2155 



Salary 
Increases 



1 



TRUSTEE 



Honorary 

Degree 

Committee 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Edwin A. Gere, Jr. has a change in title from Assistant Professor 
"A", U of M old salary scale at $6,435 step 3 to Assistant Director, 
Bureau of Government Research - new salary $6,786 step 3. He is to 
receive regular steps as earned to the maximum of $7,878. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

i 

VOTED : To make the personnel adjustments as described 
in Attachment C attached to these minutes and 
hereby made a part of these minutes to be 
effective February 28, 1960. 

The President stated that because of certain ambiguities 

in Chapter 620, Acts of 1959 as it applies to personnel at the 

University of Massachusetts an opinion of the Attorney General 

ought to be sought regarding the personnel adjustments taken in the 

previous vote. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To have the Attorney-General interpret 
Chapter 620, Acts of 1959 as it applies 
to personnel listed on Attachment C of 
these minutes and advise the Trustees 
as to the legality of the personnel 
adjustments made in Attachment C of 
these minutes. 

The Secretary of the Board of Trustees, who is also 
Secretary of the faculty honorary degree committee, reported the 
recommendations of the committee for the awarding of honorary de- 
grees recommended at the meeting of the Honorary Degree Committee 
on February 5, 1960. On motion by Trustee Brett and seconded by 
Trustee Schuck, it was 

VOTED : To lay the report of the Faculty Honorary 
Degree Committee on the table. 

Trustee Schuck recommended that the Board of Trustees 

award no more honorary degrees until the Trustees have had an 

opportunity to study the procedure and philosophy involved in 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

awarding honorary degrees. She said that she did not intend for 

this recommendation to be construed as her opposing any person 

trustee recommended in the report of the Honorary Degree Committee. 

Trustee Brett announced that the Massachusetts Taxpayers 

Federation at his suggestion had withdrawn proposed legislation 

calling upon the New England Board of Higher Education to study the 

problem of regional agricultural education on the grounds that he 

would submit a resolution to the Board of Trustees of the University 

of Massachusetts calling for such action. On his recommendation 

and on motion duly made and seconded, the following resolution was 

adopted : 

"WHEREAS the University of Massachusetts has been cooperating 
with the New England Board of Higher Education in its program 
to foster specialized programs in many fields, including 
those in agriculture; 

"WHEREAS it may be possible for the New England Board of 
Higher Education to effect significant economies in the 
field of agricultural instruction, it is 

"RESOLVED that the Board of Trustees of the University urge 
the New England Board of Higher Education to conduct studies 
of the possible advantages to the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts for a regional cooperative approach to instruction 
in agriculture at the undergraduate and graduate levels and 
it is further 

"RESOLVED that copies of this resolution be transmitted 
to the Boards of Trustees of the Land-Grant Universities 
in New England and ask them to cooperate with the New 
England Board of Higher Education in such studies as 
they may make." 

President Mather said that in consideration of the 

progress that has been made toward the solution of educational 

administrative problems in the Division of Physical Education, and 

in view of the prestige that a change in designation to the School 

of Physical Education would bring to the undergraduate and graduate 

students in the program, it is time to elevate the division to the 



2157 



New England 
Board of 
Higher 
Education 



/Wi O 



TRUSTEE 



School of 

Physical 

Education 



School of 
Nurs ing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

status of a school. As the Division of Physical Education continues 

to increase in size and diversity of program, it seemed appropriate 

to recognize by name that it has in fact become a school. Such 

recognition would represent a change in title only and would not 

in itself involve any alteration in program, staff or budget. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To redesignate the Division of Physical 
Education as the School of Physical 
Education. 

The President said that when our program in Nursing was 
first set up, it was according to the Board of Trustees action, 
called a Division of Nursing. Subsequently it began to be known 
as the School of Nursing. In some actions of the Board of Trustees 
on personnel appointments and so on, it was referred to as the 
School of Nursing. It would be useful to have official action by 
the Board of Trustees designating the Division of Nursing as the 
School of Nursing. It is very logical to have a School of Nursing 
rather than a Division of Nursing for students take a major in the 
field of Nursing. Being officially designated the School of 
Nursing gives it the status which it deserved. 

On recommendation of the President and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To redesignate the Division of Nursing as 
the School of Nursing. 

The communique from the Student Senate regarding 
compulsory ROTC was referred to the Committee on Faculty and Pro- 
gram of Study for further study. 



2159 



TRUSTEE 



a 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On recommendation of the Secretary and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To confirm all official actions of the 
President and of the committees of the 
Board of Trustees for the previous year. 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Nominating Committee, 

made his report. On his recommendation and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To instruct the Secretary to cast one 
ballot for the following slate of 
officers and committee members for the 
Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts for the year 1960-61. 

President - Foster Furcolo 
Honorary Chairman - Joseph W. Bartlett 
Chairman - Frank L. Boyden 
Secretary - John Gillespie 
Treasurer - Kenneth W. Johnson 



Executive Committee 

Frank L. Boyden, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
William M. Cashin 

Committee on Faculty and Program of Study 
Dennis M. Crowley, Chairman 
Harry D. Brown 
John W. Haigis 

Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture 
Harry D. Brown, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
Dennis M. Crowley 



Dennis M. Crowley 
Joseph P. Healey 
Philip F. Whitmore 



Owen B. Kiernan 
Victoria Schuck 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Charles H. McNamara 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
Philip F. Whitmore, Chairman 
Alden C. Brett 
John W. Haigis 

Committee on Finance 

Alden C. Brett, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 
J. John Fox 



F. Roland McDermott 
Victoria Schuck 



Joseph P. Healey 
George L. Pumphret 



Committe e on Recognized Student Activities 

JJohn W. Haigis, Chairman F. Roland McDermott 

Harry D. Brown Victoria Schuck 

Dennis M. Crowley 



Committees 



'1 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Committee on Legislation 
J. John Fox, Chairman 
William M. Cashin 
Joseph P. Healey 

Committee on Athletics 

William H. Cashin, Chairman 
Dennis M. Crowley 
Joseph P. Healey 



Ernest Hoftyzer 
Philip F. Whitmore 



George L. Pumphret 
Philip F. Whitmore 



The Secretary cast the ballot as instructed. 
The meeting adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 




Secretary 



December 4» 1959 



The Trustees of the University of Sfessaehu&etts 

with 
the Selectmen of the Town of Aethers t 
Acting as the Sewer Conaaiss loners of the 
Town of Aa&er#t ; j Massachusetts 



TO2EB&S the Town of Amherst has been providing sewage disposal and 
treatment for the University of Massachusetts at charges established by the 
Town for all other users, and 

WHERE&S It sow becomes necessary for the Town of AsBherst to expand its 
sewage treatment plant and f aclli&ies to i&eet the emending needs of the 
University of Massachusetts and other growth of the town, and 

WHEREAS the town of iysherst by action of it® Town Meeting held on 
Beeeiaber 16 s 1959 P has authorised the sxpanslon of the sewage treatment plant 
and has voted a bond issue to p&y for said project, and 

OT2EMS the treasurer of the University and the Construction and 
Maintenance Engineer of the University have tmi&wd the preliminary plans 
for the expansion of the sewage treatment plant && prepared by Haley and 
Ward* Engineers £ . dated j&oves&er 3* 1£59 9 and found said plans to be satis- 
factory for the e&panding negds of the university, and 

WHSRlaS the Oeaeral Court of Massachusetts has appropriated One Hundred 
thousand Dollars ($100^000,00) in Chapter 433 of the Act© of 1959 for a 
payment to the Tocm of Amherst on behalf of the University of Massachusetts 

as part of the cost of construction of an addition to the sewage treatment 
plant, and 

WHERB&S said Chapter 433 of the Acts of 1939 provided further m follows 
"that the University shall first negotiate an agreeiaanfe with said town for 

continuing service at die plant", and 

tfKERSAS it is to the uufcual interest of the University of Massachusetts 

and the Tmm, of <feher$t to continue this long- established arrangement of 
sewage diaposal in the interest of econoiity and efficiency for fecth p'rties 9 

MOW WXTISSSSETH that the trustees of the University, hereinafter referred 
to as the University s and the Selectmen of the Town of Aoheret acting as the 
Sewer Conaaiss loner s s hereinafter referred to as the town* do hereby enter 
into the following covenants and agreements: 

!* the Town acting through its Sewer Comaiss loners shall instruct its 
engineers to complete the design for the expansion of the Sewage 
Treatment Plant y the interceptor line* the outfall line and pusnp» 
ing station as authorised by vote of the Town* 



2o Upon completion of final plans , specifications and cost estimates, 
the Town shall submit this information to the Treasurer of the 
University for review and comment by himself and/or any members 
of the University staff or engineers designated by hln. The Board 
of Sever Commies loners agree to ^i^e full consideration to any 
recommendations made by the Treasurer concerning the design and 
specifications of the sewage improvements. The decision of the 
Sewer Commissioners shall be final In all eases, 

3o The Board of Sever Commissioners acting for the Town of Amherst 
agree to provide sewerage treatment service to the University up 
to a maximum enrollment of 10,000 students* If the student en- 
rollment should increase beyond this ma3£i£mis% sewerage service 
Shall continue to be provided so long as additional capital con- 
struction is not required* If additional construction is required 
it shall be the subject of separate agreement «. 

4. The Board of Sewer Commissioners hereby covenants and agrees to 
provide continuing sewage treatment for the University within the 

limits specified above at the same rate or charges that apply co 
all other large volume user® of said facilities in the Town of 

Amherst, 

5* The University may acting through its Treasurer request the con- 
struction and installation of special facilities for instructional 
and research purposes at the Sewage Treatment Plant* Final design 
of these facilities shall be coordinated with the Town 3 ® engineers* 
All cacp&nses and design and construction of such facilities shall be 
borne by the University and in all cases the decision of the Board 
of Sewer Commissioners shall be final. 

6, That* when the Board of Smmr Commissioners have signed a eon™ 
attraction contract with a reliable contractor , suitably bonded, 
for the construction of additions and improvements to the Sewage 
Treatment Plenty the University will authorise the State Treasurer 
to make payment of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000*00) to 
the Town of Amherst, as prafided for in Item 1350-27 of Chapter 
433 of the Acts of 1959* 



Witness our hands and seals this 
nineteen Hundred and 



day of 



Witnesses : 



TRUSTEES OF THE UHXVE8SXTY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Kenneth W» Johnson 9 Treasurer 



Witnesses: 



SELECTMEN OF THE TOWN OF AMESRST 



* rn .m vnw&j *w> i-x«Ut> 



Approved as to Form: 



Assistant Attorney General 



i 



ATTACHMENT n 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Personnel Actions 
February 23, 1960 



APPOINTMENTS 



ALLEN, Albert, Special Instructor in Agronomy, effective January 17, 1960 and 
for six weeks through February 27, 1960 at $100 per week. Mr. Allen will teach 
the course in Care and Use of Turf Machinery for the Winter Turf School and 
will assist in teaching the machinery part of our regular Stockbridge Turf 
Course. To be paid from 03 funds. 

BARKER, Charles F. , Instructor ;i A M in Agricultural Engineering <% time) , 
effective January 31, 1960 at $2,535 per year. B.S. in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing from West Virginia University in January 1960. Currently enrolled in our 
Graduate School. 

BURKE, Terence, Assistant Professor of Geography, effective September 1, 1960 
at $5,460 per year. B.A. University of Birmingham, England, 1952. Expects 
Ph.D. in June, 1960. He is presently in the Education Branch of the Royal Air 
Force, stationed in Northern Ireland and is due for release in July, 1960. 

KHABBAZ, Samir A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective January 31, 
1960 at $5,070 per year, for sacond semester only. B.S. Bethel College, 1954; 
M.S. University of Kansas, 1956; Ph.D., University of Kansas expected in 1960. 
Has done research at the University of Kansas summers, 1955-53 inclusive and 
comes to us from that University. His recommendations stress his ability in 
mathematical research. Although he is not a native of this country, he speaks 
excellent English. 

KING, David B., Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate 1/3 time), effective 
January 31, 1960 at $1,433.66 per year but not to exceed 26 weeks or August 31, 
1960. B.S. University of Massachusetts, 1959. Currently enrolled in our 
Graduate School. 

ROYCHOUDHURY, Rathindra N. , Instructor S, A !5 Agronomy (% time), effective 
February 7, 1960 at $2,535 per year. B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of Calcutta, 
1943, 1945, 1950; also M.S. Columbia University. Worked in Engineering Center 
at Columbia University from 1952-55; worked under a graduate fellowship at 
M. I.T. from 1955 to date. Has applied for admission to our Graduate School. 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

ANDERSON, Richard B. , Assistant Football Coach, effective January 31, 1960 at 
$7,743 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. in Physical Education, Univer- 
sity of Nebraska, 1954. Head Football Coach and Head Track Coach at Rich Town- 
ship High School in Park Forest, Illinois, September 1954 to February 1, 1960. 
To be paid 26 weeks for second semester only. 



2. 

APPOINTMENT S ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

CONANT, Francis P., Assistant Professor of Anthropology, effective September 1, 
i960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Cornell University; 
expects Ph.D. Columbia University in June, 1960. As of June, 1960, Mr. Conant 
will have had two years of teaching experience at Columbia and Hunter and two 
years of research experience. He has also had experience as an editorial 
assistant for The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and has held 
various scholarships including a Ford Fellowship to Nigeria. He has published 
three articles and has one chapter of an edited volume now in press. 

DELANEY, Robert, Assistant Athletic Coach, U of M. , effective January 31, 1960 
at $6,006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. in Physical Education, Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 195S. Assistant Football Coach and Instructor in Physical 
Education at University of Illinois from 1958 to February 1960. To be paid 
26 weeks only for second semester. 

Mcliaffey, Ronald A,, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,500 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.Sc. Brooklyn Polytechnic 
Institute, 1951; M.Sc. Iowa State College, 1955. Teaching Assistant at Iowa 
State College, 1954-55; Instructor at Newark College of Engineering, 1955-56; 
Teaching Assistant at Rutgers University, 1956-57; Assistant Instructor at 
Rutgers University, 1957-58; Instructor at Rutgers University, 1958-60. 

PRICE, Louis E., Assistant Professor of Psychology, effective September 1, 1960 
at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. U.C.L.A. , 1957; M.A. State 
University of Iowa, 1959; expects Ph.D. at Iowa in August, 1960. Has had ex- 
perience at Iowa from 1958 to present as research assistant and as teaching 
assistant. 

STUDLEY, Charles B. , Head Football Coach, U of M, effective January 31, 1960 
at $9,100 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. in Physical Education, Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1951. Teacher Coach, Alton Senior High School, Alton, 
Illinois, 1952-55; Assistant Football Coach, University of Illinois, 1955-60. 

PROMOTIONS 

AGARWAL, Paul D. , from Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering to Pro- 
fessor of Electrical Engineering, effective March 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

BETT, Gilbert W. , from Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, effective March 1, 1960 at 
$7,527 per year. 

DiMAGGIO, Gellestrina T. , from Assistant Professor "A" of Maternal and Child 
Nursing to Associate Professor "A", effective February 28, 1960 at $8,372 per 
year. 

GAGN0N, Paul A. , from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of History, 
effective March 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 



3. 
CHANGE TO FULL-TI ME EMPLOYMENT 

EVANS, David A., Assistant Professor "A", Dairy and Animal Science, effective 
January 31, 1960 at $6,981 per year. Has been on half-time since September 1, 
1957 while working toward Ph.D. degree in Food Science. 

REINSTAT EMENT 

FKAKER, Charles F. , Jr., Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 
1960 at $5,304 per year. Mr. Fraker has been on leave of absence without pay 
since September 1, 1957. 

TRANSFER OF APPOINTMENT 

ANNABLE, William P., Instructor "A !J , Agricultural Engineering (% time), 
effective February 28, 1960 at $2,860 per year, to be paid from Federal Funds 
instead of Eastern States Fund. 

MENTAL HEALTH TRAINING GRANT - 2M-6244-C4 

RIGGS, Margaret M. , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, for first semester, 1959- 
60 and second semester, 1959-60. She is to help in the graduate clinical 
training program and is to receive $500 for each semester. 

WINDER, Alvin E. , Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, for second semester 1959- 
60. He is to be paid $500 from Mental Health Training Grant. 

APPOINTMENT S FOR G. E. PROGRAM, PITTSF IELD 

LITTLEJOHN, Lyance G. , Jr., Instructor in Physics, first semester of academic 
year 1959-60 at $112.67. 

STENGLE, Thomas R, , Instructor in Chemistry, second semester of academic year 
1959-60 at $669.54. 

ADDITIONAL CO MPENSAT ION 

ANDERSON, Richard B. , Assistant Football Coach, U of M. From July 31 to 
August 31, 1960 at $158.00 per week. 

DELANEY, Robert, Assistant Athletic Coach, U of M. From July 31 to August 31, 
1960 at $125.00 per week. 

STUDLEY, Charles B., Head Football Coach, U of M. From July 31, 1960 to 
August 31, 1960 at $185.25 per week. 

TEICHNER, Warren H. , Associate Professor of Psychology, to work as Principal 
Investigator on Research Grant NSF G-10918 on the following days: January 
26, 27, 28 and 29, 1960 at the rate of $37.63 per day. 



I 



4. 
TWELVE- MONTH BASIS 

Effective September 1, I960, service in the following positions will be re- 
quired on a twelve-month basis: 

Assistant Director of Athletics, U of M 

Head Football Coach, U of M 

Assistant Football Coach, U of M 

Athletic Coach, U of M 

Assistant Athletic Coach, U of M 

EMERITUS 

ANDERSON, Jessie L. , Assistant Professor of Entomology, Emeritus, effective 
February 29, 1960. 

RAND, Frank P., Professor of English, Emeritus, effective June 30, 1960. 

RITCHIE, Walter S. , Goessmann Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, effective 
June 30, 1960. 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step- rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable during 
the months of March and April, 1960. 

To approve Chapter 620 increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule, effective February 28, 1960, 

APPOIN TMENT ABOVE MINIMUM 

SHELLNUT, Clarence B. , Program Coordinator of the Student Union, effective 
March 13, 1960 at $5,083 per year. He will be coming to us with ten years 
of experience as Director of the Lebanon, New Hampshire Community Center and 
with a tremendous background in recreation and community activities and 
services. 



ADDITIONA L COMPENSATION 

SNEDECOR, James G. , Principal Investigator at $48.00 per week for the period 
January 12, 1960 to May 31, 1960 from National Institute of Arthritis & 
Metabolic Diseases. 



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I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

March 21, 1960, 1:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Cashin, Crowley, 
Haigis, Healey, Kiernan, McNamara, 
Pumphret, Schuck, Whitmore, Also, 
Secretary Gillespie, Treasurer 
Johnson, Budget Commissioner 
Morrissey and Lichterman 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with, the Chairman called the meeting to order 

Trustee Whitmore, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings 

and Grounds reported the Committee's actions taken on March 17, 

1960. Upon the Committee's recommendation and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary design of the 
Fourth Section of the Science Center with 
the modification suggested by the 
Committee to be approved at a subsequent 
meet ing . 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary design of the 
School of Business Administration in- 
cluding the site plan of the complex of 
buildings as shown in the model. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the preliminary design of the 
Engineering Building. 

In keeping with rental charges in other dormitories and 

on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of 

Section 3 of Chapter 456 of the Acts of 
1958, to establish the rental rate of $27.75 
per month for the Head of Residence suite in 
Hills House South and Hills House North. 



2161 



Science 
Center - 
Fourth 
Section 



School of 
Business 
Adminis t rat ioi 



Engineering 
Building 



Head of 
Res idence 
Hills House 



2162 



TRUSTEE 



Science 
Center - 
Second 
Section 

Dickinson 
Hall 



Architectural 
Consultant 



Catholic 
Chapel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 
VOTED ; To accept 

1. Science Center, Second Section, Mass. 
State Project U-57-1, Columbia Con- 
struction Company as of February 17, 
1960. 

2. R.O.T.C. Building, Mass. State Project 
U-57-2, Wiley and Foss Company as of 
February 3, 1960. 

Trustee Whitraore also reported that the Committee on 

Buildings and Grounds discussed problems involved in planning and 

executing a building development program for the campus. In order 

to insure that the Trustees are moving in the proper manner, the 

Committee recommended and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To appoint one, two or three distinguished 

architectural consultants to reassess and/or 
redevelop the architectural philosophy and 
to review the master plan of the University 
of Massachusetts campus and to request the 
Commission on Administration and Finance to 
make funds available to pay such consultants. 

Trustee Whitmore reported that the Diocese of Springfield 
has purchased some land abutting the campus where a chapel for 
Catholic students will be constructed. The architect, after a pre- 
liminary study, thinks that the property is too small for the 
project. An inquiry has been made to see if the Board of Trustees 
under their authority of Sections 25 and 27 of Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws would consider selling a small parcel of land so the 
chapel would have an adequate setting. The Secretary has been 
directed to inquire of the Attorney General if the Trustees had the 
authority to sell land to such an organization and to ascertain how 
much land would be involved. 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In the absence of the Chairman of the Legislative 

Committee, Trustee Whitmore reported on action discussed at its 

meeting on March 21, 1960. On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To reaffirm the principle of more administra- 
tive control for the Board of Trustees over 
the operation of the University of Massachu- 
setts commensurate with the responsibility 
the Board of Trustees has to operate a high 
quality institution: And to urge the 
modernization of Chapter 75 of the General 
Laws to enable the Board of Trustees to 
operate a modern university. 

On recommendation of the Faculty and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award the appropriate bachelor's degrees 
to persons listed on Attachment A to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes. 

On recommendation of the Graduate Faculty and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award the appropriate graduate degree to 
persons listed in Attachment B to these 
minutes and hereby made a part of these 
minutes . 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions, and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment C which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

On recommendation of the Chairman and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept the resignation of Jean Paul 
Mather from the presidency of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts effective at 
the close of business on March 31, 1960. 



2163 



Degrees 



Degrees 



Personnel 
Actions 



Jean Paul 
Mather - 
Resignation 



64 



TRUSTEE 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Four 
College 
Cooperative 
Program 



President 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize sabbatical leaves subject 
to the usual conditions established 
by the Board of Trustees to persons 
listed in Attachment D to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes 
and to permit the substitution of 
alternates listed in Attachment D if 
there is a vacancy. 

Financing the Four College Cooperation program was 
discussed as a result of an inquiry from the coordinator. The 
Chairman was directed to write the participants of the cooperative 
program indicating the Board of Trustees will explore all possi- 
bilities of participating in the program in a more financially 
equitable manner. 

On recommendation of the Executive Committee and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize Jean Paul Mather, the use of 
the President's House on the campus of the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
until June 30, 1960 provided he pays $100 
per month rent. The maid assigned to the 
President's House is to be reassigned to 
another position on the campus until the 
vacancy in the Office of President is 
filled. 

Trustee Crowley stated that although the Board of Trustees 

has accepted the resignation of President Mather effective March 31, 

1960 and thus there will be a vacancy in the Office of President, 

no action need be taken in filling the position immediately for the 

By-Laws of the Board of Trustees make provision for the performance 

of the duties of President. Specifically the By-Laws provide: 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"In the event of a vacancy in the office of the 
President of the University, or during his absence 
or inability to attend to the duties of that office, 
the Provost of the University or some other officer 
who may be designated by the President, shall per- 
form the duties of the President until some other 
person is appointed President pro tern by the Board 
of Trustees, or until the office is regularly filled." 

On recommendation of the Treasurer and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 

Johnson, to sign a license agreement be- 
tween the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts and the Western Massachu- 
setts Broadcasting Council, Inc. per- 
mitting the installation, operation, and 
sub-licensing of F.M. radio and/or tele- 
vision receiving and transmitting equip- 
ment on university property on Mt. Lincoln 
in Pelham and the furnishing of certain 
services, in furtherance of the program 
of Four College Cooperation. Copy of the 
agreement is on file in the Treasurer's 
Office. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize a transfer of $10,000 from 
the Student Union Food Service Fund to 
the Student Union General Fund for the 
purpose of replacing furnishings in the 
Student Union. 

The minutes of the meeting of the Board of Trustees of 
February 23, 1960 with the following addition made by Trustee 
Schuck, "On motion by Trustee Fox and seconded by Trustee Schuck, 
the report of the Buildings and Grounds Committee was tabled" were 
approved as distributed, 

Chairman Boyden reviewed the progress being made in re- 
cruiting a new President. He announced that many more nominees would 
be interviewed and invited trustees to attend the interview sessions 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 



Secretary 



2165 



Provost 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Broadcasting 
Council, Inc. 



Student 
Union Funds 



2166 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
April 26, 1960, 1:00 p.m., Student Union, U of M, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Healey, 
McNamara, Pumphret, Schuck, 
Sullivan, Whitmore, Secretary 
Gillespie, Treasurer Johnson, 
Provost McCune, Kermit Morrissey 
representing Governor Furcolo 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with, the Chairman called the meeting to order, 

The minutes of the meeting of March 21, 1960 were 
approved as distributed. 

Treasurer Johnson indicated that the plan for making the 

University Boarding Halls a trust fund operation under the 

direction of the Board of Trustees is progressing satisfactorily. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That with the establishment of the Univer- 
sity Boarding Halls as a self-supporting 
trust fund, the policy is adopted of pay- 
ing to the Commonwealth the estimated cost 
of the state's share of retirement group 
insurance and industrial accident coverage 
for the state employees of the Boarding Hall. 

Applying the above policy in part to other operations of 

the University, and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the policy be established effective 
May 1, 1960 of paying the state's share 
of the group insurance premiums for each 
employee of the University who is covered 
by group insurance, under Chapter 32A of 
the General Laws, whose base salary is 
paid from University Trust Funds authorized 
under Section 5A and Section 7 of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws except when the terms 
of the said Trust Funds prohibit such payment. 



2167 



University 

Boarding 

Halls 



Group 
Insurance 



2168 



TRUSTEE 



Philip E. 
Hasbrouck 
Scholarship 



Trust Fund 

Interest 

Account 



University of 
Massachusetts 
Building 
Association 



Diplomas - 
Shannon McCune 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Upon recommendation of Treasurer Johnson and on motion 

duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Trustees express to Josiah C. 
Folsom of the Class of 1910 their 
willingness to accept with gratitude 
the proposed scholarship endowment fund 
in memory of Professor Philip E. 
Hasbrouck in accordance with the terms 
set forth in his letter of January 14, 
1960 on file in the Treasurer's Office. 

Provost McCune pointed out that the need for scholarship 

aid for needy students increases each year. On recommendation of 

Treasurer Johnson and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the use of Trust Fund in- 
terest of $6500 for scholarships and 
$4500 for grant-in-aid to be administered 
by the University Scholarship Committee. 

Trustee Brett, who is also chairman of the University of 

Massachusetts Building Association, described the legal position of 

the operation as a result of recent supreme judicial court 

decisions. He stressed the imperative need for immediate action to 

resolve some existing problems confronting the Building Association. 

On recommendation of Trustee Crowley and on motion duly made and 

seconded, it was 

VOTED : To have Trustee Brett and the Legislative 
Committee of the Board of Trustees meet 
with the Governor as soon as possible to 
describe the situation affecting the dormi- 
tory building program of the University and 
the need for immediate action to see that 
the dormitory building program is continued 
on schedule and to take necessary action to 
fulfill this goal. 

On recommendation of the Secretary and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Provost Shannon McCune to 

sign diplomas to be awarded in June 1960. 



Attachment A 



DEGREES TO BE AWARDED AFTER FALL SEMESTER 1959 
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Nancy Dodge Frost 



Paul A. Keene 



Donald Lee Brennan 
Hope Chlebus 
James P. Creedon 
Marjory Alice Gamblln 
Joseph Phelan Hannon 
Judith fol Hawkins 
Elizabeth Ellen Keogh 
Richard Bremner Killoh 
Clifford Owen Leslie „ Jr. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Magna Cum Laude 



Cum Laude 



Rite 



Philip Au Wood 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Magna Cum Laude 

Helen Virginia Krause 

Cum Laude 



Peter Hamilton 



Ralph Linwood Snow 



Judith Morris Merrill 

Erwin Pally 

Sylvia L. Pally 

Nancy Ellen Paul 

James Robert Pease 

Leslie Sue Radcliffe 

Anthony S» Scalzi 

Hayden Burditt Tibbetts, Jr 

J^ohn Jay West 



Alice Thompson Beattie 



Kenneth Edward Bannon 
Ernest Richard Pirro 
Gabriel la Maria Ratay 



Stanley Eugene Everett 



Rite 



Margaret Re id Rousseau 
Martin B. Silverman 
Walter Spiewak 
Frederic Anton Whitney 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Cum Laude 

James John Lark in 



-3- 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 

Jean Ruth Crosby Barbara Dean Freeman 

DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Rite 

Richard A. Shattuok Harold Charles Wilson, Jr. 



. • 









' 






' 



■ 
■ 

■ 

- 



_ 



ATTACHMENT r 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Personnel Actions 
March 21, 1960 



APPOINTMENTS 



COUGHLIN, Mrs. Joan Hopkins, Instructor "A :l , Agricultural Communications, 
effective July 5, I960 at $5,460 per year. Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhode 
Island School of Design, 1953. For the past 2% years she has been an active 
free lance illustrator and designer. 

SRIVASTAVA, Rama K. , Instructor :r A ! ', Agricultural Engineering (% time), 
effective March 27, 1960 at $2,730 per year. B.S. in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, 1953. Soil Conservation Engineer, 1953-54; Agricultural Engineer, 
1954-57; Lecturer in Agricultural Engineering, Assam Agricultural College, 
1957-59. 

REINSTATEMENT 

DRAKE, Mack, Professor ''A", Chemistry, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$10,905 per year. He is returning after a special assignment as Exchange 
Professor to Hokkaido University. 

WESTCOTT, George W. , Professor "A", Agricultural Economics, effective 
September 13, 1960 at $10,935 per year. He is returning after a special 
assignment as Exchange Professor of Agricultural Economics at Hokkaido 
University. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

ALLEN, Luther A., Assistant Professor of Government for the academic year 
1960-61 who has accepted a Visiting Professorship in Political Science at 
the University of Saigon under a Smith-Mundt grant. 

APPOINTMENT FOR G. E. SUMMER PROGRAM. PITTSFIELD 

PIERCE, Ames S. , Associate Professor in History for the period June 6 through 
July 22, 1960 for a total of six hours per week for the seven week period at 
a total salary of $940.30 (step 5). 

EXTRA COM PENSATION 

LILLY, Dennis, Lecturer in Physical Education during the illness of William 
Foot rick, to be employed starting March 14, 1960 for a period not to exceed 
April 15, 1960 at the rate of $4.00 per hour. This employment will not ex- 
ceed 9 hours per week and is to be paid from 03 funds. 

TEICHNER, Warren H. , Associate Professor of Psychology, will work on Research 
Grant AFOSR 60-2 on the following days: March 19 , 26; April 2, 9, 18, 19, 
20, 21, 22, 23, 30; May 7, 14, 21, 27, 28, 30, 31; June 1, 2, 3, 4, 1960 at 
the rate of $40.62 per day. 

On February 23, 1960, the Trustees voted to put the position of Athletic 
Coach, U of M on a twelve -month I>a^>- This is to rescind that action and return 



Afctadnaaat 



The following Ssbbatic&l h®mM& m® reaowntndad ftuojact to th« 
condltiona «6t4b21«lM»<S by the aoatd of Xruataoti 



Stasis 

To : 

Duration. 
Put poaa : 



To- 
Duration; 

Purpoaa » 



Title*. 

To; 

Duration; 



''ouie A, Carpino 

Assistant Profaaeoer of tftwaistry 

Maitis; University, Gatatany 

Acadeailc y*«r 1 960-6! $£ half pay 
Thia atudy ia port 'of a long- tana m%A4y o£ the rede 
oxidation of hydraalna dariva&ivea 

David R, Clark 

Aasociafca !?rel£«osor o£ English 

Ireland 

to&toic. year 2960-63. at half pay 

To coqpleta book oji VI, 8, Yaata 



of 



Prod C. Elbert 

Hesdj DepartmBiiit of Gasman 

California, Philadelphia, Germany 

Fall eaawotar I960 at full pay 

To eoMplata a &#ri<et& of essays porta 

litaratura and literary figuraa 

to Ft&nss iferfal 



Anne tr la 



iniog to G 

ranging from 



ic hi 



Tit I©.; 
To : 
Durot ion : 



■;&-av 



Durat ion 



TO; 
. is km; 

. ■ 



Seymour Spateln 

Aeaociata Profaeaor of Payehology 
At home 

fail semester I960 at full pi&y 

To write &p few publication eempleted acudiaa conducted 
under ISaM %«&£#& Grant 

Robert Sc Faldsiaa 

rrofoaae* of Payehology 

Un iity of California (Lea Angei.ee) at Walter Reed 

4r?^ Inetitute of R&eearch m Lena! iMtltnta oj 

Mental lMltb, feskemfc, dryland 
Academic y«a-r 1960-61 m ha ,-.y 
Study . nearefe on the ef facts »&yehofcropi«; drugs 

and brali slation en behavior rigidity ■ also irilj 

tab* eetsr&a© in ttaurean&te&gr i rephysiology 

Sumner - ^cield 

Assistant Profes®©* *f ftemance Language® 

Madrid-, Spain 

3e< ■ ■ of academic yaar 1960*61 at fall pay 

To do fu aspects of ' ; : ns Spaniels 



■ ". ■- 

To; 

Durat ion : 
Purpose; 



Sirs, toae 

■ '■ietair:: ®s EconoBiics 

nali Uni ;.ty 

960-61 ss is pay 
To && pi- lional iiqprovamnnt work in Mot 
. I &nd research i» inter 



Bcunamj . • '--id 

aaig cl housing 



2, 



SffSSK ■; 
Title; 
To; 

Duration: 
Purpeae i 



Warren Litehy 

Professor of Backer iolegy 
Uaivereity of Southern California 

Fall aesaaster I960 at fail pay 

Further studies in bacteriology t eapeelally la the field of 

tracer work and radio active sulfur 



Title: 

To t 
Durations 



Lewie C. Mains v- 

&ssist&at Praffeeeor of Govero&ent 

tfashington,, D« C« 

Fall aesKtater l$e0 at fail * : 

Pursuing study on the aa&jor reaaareh 
Federal Goveraaent 



•.'.' ■■■;'.' . 



4 



; { ] £ 



Tot 
Daratioa: 



Joha y. Manfred! 

Asa latent Professor of Sociology 

tiaiveralty of Soa*© 

Second oeaeeter a£ aaadeaic year l$$0< 
Work on aeet&rianisai 



tf 



■: ; v.;>. 



He Duncan Sollsaea 

Titles asee-slate Profiesaer of Soology 

To : University of Arlaona 

Duration; Acadeisie year 1960-61 *t h*ii • j 

Purpose ; Investigate tea-pea** of the reekalnia$ 

separectoasy its the rat and azouse 



kidney to unilateral 



y-.wwjw\w. 



Title; 

Duration: 



Richard Ravae 

Assise mt Professor ©£ English 

Sag laud aad Caofrridge, Hsasechuaetta 

Aeademie year 1960-61 at half pay 
Complete research aad study for a book 

of language aad • structure ia the religious lyric siace 

1798 



Tit la: 

TOi- 
Deration: 



Elmer jar? 
As&istanfc Professor 
Michigan State i 
Academic year } 
For professional 
theory 



of Agricultural Ecenestlee 



at half pay 
ravaaant ia field ef s&dara economic 



Tit ! 
To z 
Daratiaa: 



Ha Ida h. ftigge 
Associate Prafeaaar of 
Ohio £tata University 
Acadaaie year 2960**$! 

To fsfc^dy for daataral 



Physical Education for Wosssea 



half pay 

degree 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To make the appointments, promotions and 
other personnel actions included in the 
list entitled Attachment A which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby made 
a part of these minutes. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To award Commonwealth Scholarships to 
persons or alternates included in the 
list entitled Attachment B which is 
attached to these minutes and hereby 
made a part of these minutes. 

Upon recommendation of the Provost and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the revised curriculum of the 
Department of Air Science as contained in 
Attachment C and the revised curriculum 
for Army ROTC as contained in Attachment 
D - both of these attachments hereby be- 
come a part of these minutes. 

In the absence of the Chairman of the Committee on 

Athletics, Trustee Crowley reported that the committee meeting on 

March 25, 1960 reviewed the athletic program at the University and 

recommended that the Trustees reaffirm the athletic policy that the 

Board adopted February 14, 1957. On the recommendation of the 

Committee on Athletics and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To reaffirm the following athletic policy: 

WHEREAS, since its founding in 1863, the University 
of Massachusetts has recognized the necessity of pro- 
viding more than technical and classical instruction for 
young men and women in preparation for adult life and 

WHEREAS, a sound physical education program is 
recognized as an essential need for the development 
of a healthy personality, able to absorb and use 
wisely the intellectual offerings of a University and 

WHEREAS, the physical education program has not 
kept pace with the progress of the University in other 
areas 



2169 



Personnel 
Actions 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



ROTC 

Curriculum 

Changes 



Athletic 
Policy 



2L70 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts endorse the following policy 
and direct the administration and faculty to take 
the necessary steps for its implementation: 

1. The required physical education program for 
both men and women students in the freshman 
and sophomore years shall continue to be an 
essential part of the University's require- 
ment for the undergraduate degree. 

2. The intramural athletic program shall be 
staffed and equipped to meet the needs of all 
students who desire to participate, and the 
University shall encourage participation 
through a varied program including sports 
with "carry-over" value for life after 
graduation. 

3. Professional courses in physical education 
shall be offered for those students desiring 
to major or minor in physical education as a 
prelude to careers as coaches or teacher- 
coaches . 

4. Consistent with present policies on admissions 
and academic standards, the intercollegiate 
athletic program shall be developed to a point 
where it is representative of the best efforts 
of the University, with aims and ideals of 
achievement comparable to those expected of 
the academic departments. This development 
shall proceed in accord with policies and 
regulations of the National College Athletic 
Association, the Eastern College Athletic 
Conference and the Yankee Conference, in 
each of which the University maintains 
membership. 

Provost McCune announced that he would like to appoint a 
group of staff and faculty members to prepare a staff study of the 
needs for medical education in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
so that the University administration would have pertinent informa- 
tion on this serious problem. On motion duly made and seconded, 
it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Provost to use available 
funds in the 03 account and trust funds 
so that a staff study of the needs of 
medical education in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts may be made. 

Provost McCune discussed the status of the New College 
proposal and announced that efforts were being made to raise money 
for its establishment. The initial fiscal effort will likely be 
made by a group of Amherst College trustees if the boards of trustees 
at Smith College, Mount Holyoke College and the University of 
Massachusetts will authorize the appointment of parallel sub- 
committees of three trustees and former trustees to work with the 
Amherst committee on recruiting a Development Board for New College. 
Provost McCune noted that the University of Massachusetts Board of 
Trustee action of February 17, 1959 was sufficient authorization for 
this matter so that no new action was necessary. 



The meeting adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 




Secretary 



2L71 



Medical 
Education 



New 
College 



2172 



TRUSTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Attachment A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Personnel Actions 
April 26, 1960 



APPOINTMENTS 



BELCK, John, Instructor : 'A", Agricultural Communications, effective 
April 17, 1960 at $5,&60 per year. B.S. Boston University School of Public 
Relations and Communications. Free lance editor, 1956-5G; school teacher, 
Southampton, Mass., 1957-58. 

EIBEN, Carl H. , Assistant Professor "A", Entomology and Plant Pathology, 
effective May 1, 1960 at $6,331 per year. B.A. Wartburg College, 1943; 
M.S. State University of Iowa, 1949. Instructor in Biology, University of 
Dubuque, 1949-50; Instructor in Biology, Wartburg College, 1950-53; Seed 
Laboratory, Iowa State University, 1958 to date. 

HARESIGN, Thomas W. , Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. B,S. New York State 
College for Teachers, 1957. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

KEOCHAKIAN, Simon V,, Instructor "A ! , Guidance, effective April 17, 1960 
at $5,460 per year. B.S. Springfield College, 1958; expects M.S. from 
Springfield College, 1960. Vocational Rehabilitation Counsellor Trainee 
at Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation in Hartford, Conn. , 1959. He is 
presently V. A. trainee in clinical psychology at V.A. Hospital in Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 

LIEBERKAN, Edward M. , Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time) , 
effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. B.S. Tufts University, 
1959. Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

PLATT, Austin P., Instructor in Zoology (Teaching Associate - 1/3 time), 
effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. B.A. Williams College, 
1959, Currently enrolled in our Graduate School. 

WADDINGT0N, Donald V., Instructor :: A", Agronomy, effective July 1, 1960 
at $5,460 per year. B.S. Pennsylvania State University, 1953; presently 
completing requirements for M.S. at Rutgers University. Employed by 
Eastern States Farmers Exchange from 1953-57. 

WILLIAMS, Schafer, Associate Professor of History, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,331 per year. B.A. and S.T,B. Harvard, 1937; M.A. Harvard, 
1939; Ph.D. University of California, 1951. Instructor at Leland Stanford 
University, 1940-41; Associate Professor at Roosevelt University, 1948-49; 
served in Library of Congress, 1952-54 as manuscripts specialist. He now 
has a book in press. 

APPOIN TMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

BROWN, James R. , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. Oregon State College, 
, 1953; M.S. Oregon State College, 1958; expects Ph.D. from Yale University 
in June, 1960. Part-time teaching at Oregon State College from 1956-58; 
did research work for Boeing Airplane during the summers of 1957, 58, 59 
and Bell Laboratories during the summer of 1960. 



' ' , 



-2- 



CODY, Cecil E. , Assistant Professor of History, effective September 1, 1960 
at $6,500 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.A, and M.A. University of 
Nebraska; Ph.D. University of Washington. He is a specialist in Japanese 
history. Assistant Instructor, University of Nebraska, 1949-50; Assistant 
Instructor, University of Washington, 1951; Research Fellow on a Ford Founda- 
tion grant, 1953-55; Instructor and later Assistant Professor, University of 
Toledo, 1955-57; Fu'* bright Lecturer and Researcher in the Fhillipinas, 1957- 
59; Far Eastern Analyst in Social Science Unit of General Electric, 1959 to date. 

CURTIS, Michael, Associate Professor of Government, effective September 1, 
1960 at $7,223 per ;rear (3 steps above minimus). E.S. London School of 
Economics, 1951; Ph.D. Cornell University, 19JS. Lecturer at The Polytechnic 
in London, 1951-54; Instructor at Yale, 1956-58; Visiting Assistant Professor 
at Connecticut College, 1953-59; Assistant Professor at Oberlin College, 
1959-60. 

DAMM, Margaret, Instructor in Art, effective September 1, I960 at $5,083 per 
year (2 steps abcs minimum). B.F.A. Oklahoma State University, 1955; M.A. 
University of Michigan, 1957; is a candidate for the Ph.D. at the University 
of Michigan. Teaching Follow, University of Michigan, 1955-56; University 
Fellow at University of Michigan, 1956-57-58; received a Hen&.rick van Loon 
Scholar, Fellowship from Dutch Government for travel in the Netherlands, 
1950-59. 

DELH0MME, Max, Associate Professor of Romance Languages, effective 
September 1, 1960 at $6,929 per year (2 stsps above minimum). Certificat 
D 1 Etudes Superieures de Mathematiques GeneraXes, University of Toulous, 1945; 
Certificat d : Etudes Lltteraires General^s, University of Bordeaux; License 
d'Anglais, 1953; C,A,P.E,S, Epreuves theorizes, 1954. Professor at C.C. 
de Monsegue Gironde, 1946-40; Assistant Professor at County School, Acton, 
London, 1948-49; French teacher at Northwood Preparatory Schoo3 , Great 
Britain, 1949-51; Professor of English at C.C. ds La Taste, 1951-53; Professor 
of English at C*C. de St. Bruno, Bordeaux, 1953-54; Professor at Inotitut 
Pedagogigue Regional, Bordeaux, 1954-55; Professor of English at Lycee 
d'Arcachon, 1955 to date. 

DELH014ME, Raymonde, Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 
1960 at $5,083 per year (2 steps above minimum). From the College Aire-S/R- 
Adour, Brevet Elementaire, BEPC, 1938; from the College de Cheverus, Bordeaux 
the Brevet Superieurs, 1942; from Ecole Norms Xe da la Gironde, Certificat 
d' Aptitude Pedagop.ioue, 1946. Ecoles Matetmlles de Bordeaux, 1945-<-i7; Ecole 
de Plein Air, Constance, Ailemagne, 1947-48; Ecoles primaires efc matfeielles 
de Bordeaux et Banlieue, 1948-55, Ecole Maternelle, Arcachon- Osiris, 1955-60. 

HARVEY, John, Instructor in Romance Languages (French), effective September 1, 
1960 at $5,304 per year (3 steps above minimum). B 9 A„ Johns Hopkins University, 
1953; II. A. Johns Hopkins University, 1954; expects Ph.D. from Yale at end of 
present academic year. He served in the Army from 1954 to 1956. All of his 
service was in France. He held a Fulbright Grant from 1958-59. This was for 
study at the Sorbonne in France, From the time of hie discharge from the Army 
until the time he was awarded the Fulbright Grant, he was a student at Yale 
Graduate School « 



-3- 

APPOINTMENTS ABOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

JONES, Alexander H. , Professor "A", Food Technology, effective July 1, 1960 
at $10,905 per year (maximum). B.Sc.A. and M.S. University of Toronto 1932 
and 1938; Ph.D. Michigan State University, 1950. Has been employed by 
Government of Canada for the past 28 years as a food technologist and 
microbiologist. 

JONES, Robert Carroll, Assistant Professor in Education, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,500 per year (4 steps above minimum), B.S. University of Maine, 
1937; M.S. University of Massachusetts, 1953; expects Ed.D. from Cornell in 
June 1960. Has had 13 years of experience as teacher and head of vocational 
agricultural departments in schools in Massachusetts and Maine. 

KENT, Robert L. , Jr., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. 
Michigan State University, 1957; M.L.A. Michigan State University, 1959. 
Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Michigan State University, 
1959-60. 

KURTH, Rudolf, Associate Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
I960 at $7,826 per year (5 steps above minimum). Ph.D. University of Berne, 
Switzerland, 1943. Scientific Assistant, University Observatory, Berne, 
Switzerland, 1948-56; Privat-Docent in Astronomy, University of Berne, 1951- 
56; Senior Research Fellow, St. Andrews, Scotland, 1952 and 1954; Lecturer in 
Astronomy, University of Manchester, England, 1956-58; Senior Lecturer in 
Astronomy, University of Manchester, England, 195C to date. 

LANICK, Lloyd J., Jr., Associate Professor of Speech, , \ 

effective September 1, 1960 at $7,527 per year (4 steps above minimum), 
B.A. Washington and Lee University, 1947; M.A. Johns Hopkins University; 
Ph.D. Yale University, 1960. Instructor in Dramatics, Washington and Lee, 
1940-51; Assistant Professor and Associate Professor, Washington and Lee 
since 1955. 

LUK0WSKI, Robert F. , Assistant Professor "A", Food Technology, effective 
May 1, 1960 at $6,929 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. and A.B. in 
Hotel and Restaurant Management, University of Denver, 1950; M.B.A. University 
of Denver, 1959. U.S. Army as cook, mess steward and club manager, 1951- 
57; Recreation Cafe, Denver, Colorado as fry cook, April -October, 1957; D, U. 
Cafeteria, Denver as night chef, June 1958-August 1950; Shwayder Brothers, 
Denver as night chef, September 1950-April 1959. Payable from Food Service 
Contract . 

McGinnis, Edward F. , Jr., Instructor "A", Psychiatric Nursing, effective 
July 10, 1960 at $6,500 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S. Adelphi 
College; M.S. expected in June I960. Has had five years of experience in 
teaching in basic school of nursing and in psychiatric nursing. To be paid 
from Mental Health Grant 2M-6400-C3. 



-4° 



MEIER, Paul J., Assistant Professor of Economics, effective September 1, 
1960 at $7,020 per year (maximum). Ph.D. University of Basel, 1953. Has 
had business experience as Assistant Foreign Secretary with Swiss Industries 
Fair; as Assistant Economic Adviser to Swiss Bank Corporation; and as 
Economist to the Credit Suisse (Canada) Limited. He was a lecturer in Busi- 
ness Administration in New Business College, 1955-56; Lecturer in Economics 
at Sir George Williams College, Montreal, 1957-56; Assistant Professor at 
Clarkson College of Technology at Potsdam, New York, 1953 to present. 

SMITH, Frank A,, Instructor in Economics, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$5,083 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.A. University of Massachusetts, 
1957. For the past three years he has been a graduate student at North- 
western. For six quarters at Northwestern he has been a Graduate Teaching 
Assistant so that he has had the equivalent of two years of beginning 
teaching experience and this qualifies him for the third step in our 
salary schedule* 

SWEET, Dale V., Assistant Professor ss A n , Landscape Architecture (Waltham), 
effective July 1, 1960 at $8,125 per year (maximum). B.S. , M.S., Ph.D. 
Michigan State University, 1951, 1953, 1956. Greenhouse, nursery work and 
private estate work, 1930-42; Assistant Professor (research) University of 
Georgia, 1956-59; Associate Professor (research) Texas A & M College, 1959 
to date. 



PROMOTIONS 



ARCHER, Robert, from Assistant Professor of Mathematics to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,527 per year. 

BRIGGS, Lawrence E. , from Associate Professor of Physical Education to Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

DZIALO, Frederick J. , from Instructor in Civil Engineering to Assises* Pro- 
fesses of Civil Engineerirg, effective fiepteober 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

EDWARDS, Frederick H. , from Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 
at $7,527 per year. 

GENTILE, Arthur, from Assistant Professor of Botany to Associate Professor 
of Botany, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,220 per year. 

HERCHENREDER, Herbert A., from Instructor in Electrical Engineering to 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 
at $6,240 per year. 

HIGGINS, George R. , from Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering to 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$6,929 per year. 

HOWARD, Marshall, from Associate Professor of Economics to Professor of 
Economics, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 



-5- 

PROMOTIONS (continued) 

LEE, Deane, from Instructor n A : ', Agricultural Economics to Assistant Pro- 
fessor "A 8 ', Agricultural Economics, effective July 1, I960 at $6,630 per year. 

LENTILHON, Robert w. , from Assistant Professor of Accounting to Associate 
Professor of Accounting, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,527 per year. 

LUDTKE, James B. , from Associate Professor of Finance to Professor of Finance, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

MARCUS, Joseph S, , from Associate Professor of Civil Engineering to Professor 
of Civil Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

OLIVER, Charles F. , from Associate Prof eosor of Education to Professor of 
Education, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

MELLEN, William J 9 , from Associate Professor "A", Poultry Science to Professor 
"A", Poultry Science, effective June 30, 1960 at $10,502 per year. 

RANDALL, William E. , from Associate Professor of Recreation to Professor of 
Recreation, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

ROGERS, Vincent R. , from Assistant Professor of Education to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,527 per year, 

SCHUSTER, Rudolf, from Associate Professor of Botany to Professor of Botany, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 per year. 

TRAVER, Jay R, from Associate Professor of Zoology to Professor of Zoology, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $3,736 per year, 

WILCE, Robert, from Instructor in Botany to Assistant Professor of Botany, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

ZAJICEK, Oliver, from Instructor in Chemistry to Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry, effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

TRANSFER OF APPOINTMENT 

MELLEN, William J., Professor "A", Poultry, effective July 1, 1960 to 
Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, to be paid from ICA-W-374 funds. It is 
recommended that approval be given to the 10% increase in salary in order 
for Mr, Mellen to accept this assignment. 

UPGRADE 

ANDERSON, James F., from Instructor in Horticulture (9 months) to Instructor 
"A", Horticulture, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,020 per year. 



— 0™ 



CHANGE TO FULL-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

BOUCHARD, Mrs, Beryl S. , Instructor "A", Home Economics, effective July 1, 
1960 at $6,760 per year. She has been on \ time basis since September 15, 

EXTRA COMPENSATION 

SNEDECOR, James G., Principal Investigator for Public Health Grant A-1266 
(C3) for four weeks from June 2 through June 30, 1960 at $273 per week. 

EMERITUS 

TAGUE, William H. , Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, Emeritus, 
effective June 30, 1960. 

V0NDELL, John H. , Associate Professor of Poultry Science, Emeritus, effective 
June 30, 1960 

STEP-RATE INCREASES 

To approve step-rate increases for members of the professional staff of the 
University in accordance with the state schedule as earned and payable 
during the months of May, June and July I960, 



EnplflntfBt: of Personnel on Project 86b»-78343 (Trust $u»4) 

Tb ,11 owing peraowB «1U fee ployed i»tenrf.ttenUy cm this 

project elective April 18, I960 until- Decenfeer *1. 1960s 

X. Frederick J. feialo* Xattrator at $2? ,62 pttt toy not to 

exceed 105 „ ' , 

2, Eteer Co Osgood, Professor at $49.14 pet 4* i » «- 

3, Herlt P. White' Bm* «£ *«* ** l 5 ^ 92 4ay m>t 

to es ' 1 105 ctes , , . 

-iane at $2*0:: hour (v apioyee) 







is no ta&fftrslty 7««. Hi *• <* F^ *• to bc 

$2«00/nr. 

Peyroll Dei *• 




ob the amount •'<>* tisse to be enploye* on the pro 

gC ! mal Science Foundstj ' ' ' ^ HefitltSi 



ATTACHMsm^ 



^Rgccwsenda t Ions ) 



nam -■---■ ■ ■ vmM ■-- 



CLASS OF 1964 



A total of 901 applications for our 25 CoMaonssealth 
Scholarships was received this y&ar, Two sub-ceaaaittaes (one 
for women and one for men) of the Scholarship Comaittee screened 
the applications aiad their recoEaaendations are attached for 
Board of Trustee action. Please note that alternate lists are 
included. 

All those reecwaended are needy and scholarly '- scholarship 
was ©easured by both College Board Scores and High School Grades, 

Attachments 3 and. 4 provide data which point up the need 
for sore freshmen scholarships. 



Craraittee on 

Financial Aid and Scholarships 

April 14* I960 



4/14/60 



CLASS OF 1964 - WOMEN ~ RECOMMENDED FOE (MMMGHWmLTH SCHOLARSHIPS 



3 Name 

i< Gorhara Susan M 

2o Gobells Bonnie Co 

3c Qilgut,:, Ann M, 

4 C D©S£Osi©rs 5 Ann L< 

5o Thorbura,. Ruth E c 

6c Brunell s Barbara 

? Stanley o Elaine M« 

8o Mason., Joyce 

9o HLaisd®H c Doris 

10 1, Patz, Frances 



3bwm 



liB) Maglio, Ursula A 
12c Brunells 9 Gail M* 
13 o Webber s Bachel L 
lh Walter o Margaret 
15 o Peszinio Patricia A 
16 o Brassilc> Karen A e 
17 « Gerry, Barbara E 
18 « Sehultz, Carol P* 
19 o Young, Judith Q 
20 a Welch e Gail A 
21* Winters© Sally A<, 
22 .._ Moore Patricia A, 
Barnes, Dorothy E c 



Co 

I 



Florence 
ISes? Bedford 
Athol 



County 



Bristol 
Worcester 



S Vfei 



Hadley Falls; Hampshire 



Waltham 

Cheshire 



Gardner 



Worcester 



Concord 



East Boston 



Middlesex 



Worcester 
Worcester 
Middlesex 
I Suffolk 

AtOTMTSS 



Quincy Korfolk 

Spring field Hampden 

Springfield 

Millis 

Wo Springfield 

Stonehaia 



Kswburyport 
Wayland 
Sorth Quincy 

Melrose 

Fitchburg 

Belmont 

Northampton 



ion 
Norfolk 
lhmp&®n 
Middlesex 
Essex 
Middle se3£ 
Norfolk 
Middlesex 
Worcester 
Middlesex 
Hampshire 



Xbta 



Art 4b Science 

Hath 

Chem or Physics 

Math 



French 



Math 



Education 



Chem< 



English 



Math 



Math 



GheMe 



Physics or 
French 






French 
Baoto 

- x- mtm 3Md BV 

French 

Math 



College 33d « 



1470 

1350 

1290' 
1290 

1280 
1230 
12?0 

1270 

12?0 



1250 



1220 
1280 
1260 
1220 



1250 

1260 
1280 
1320 

1200 



Resources 

63s 

668 
668 
551 
589 
527 
633 
538 



589 
480 
481 



592 
599 
603 
637 
763 
660 
661 
652 
669 



2 



i 

26 . 
27, 

28 . 
29 c 

30 O 

32, 
33o 

3^o 



Downey 9 Pauls 
Franklin* Ban?als 
Kellsye Veronica A 
Fossj Patricia D 
Thompson,. Esther 
Stearns Sally S 
Korona, Jacqusllne'Ti 
Halls Harlan A« 
Johnston Patricia 
Morrill* Jan© E, 
C randall « Kathleen 



'Ibwr* 



35 o Qusy £ Barbara B. 
m Dunbar fi Bett® L 



South Dennis 

Vineyard Bavem 
Springfield 

Tops fie Id 

Springfiold 

Framlngham 

Sharon 

Fairbaven 

Dracut 

Fittsfiold 

Jtelros© 



Coifflrfgr 

rnstable 



■ pf oik 



;»®n 
SS&sax 
Hampden 
Hiddl^sex 
Norfolk 
Norfolk 
Bristol 
Middlesex 
Berkshire 
Middlesex 



Total 
re 



Math or Edo 
Biology 



Cham, 



Lib D Arts 



bh 



Astronomy ? 



Sociolcr:: 



French 



Q&Mm&M* §£1&££9*® 



1210 
12&0 

1240 
1230 
1310 
1360 
1270 
1250 
1220 
1310 

*3io 

1260 
1220 



69^ 
733 
799 
807 
363 
938 
9S& 
808 
896 
912 
963 
983 
979 



I 



; 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Cerastonwealth Scholarships * Men 



$©&& 



I Delaney, Jeiaes Robert 

Z tub in* Paul David 

3 Wilkins t Adrian Rupert 

4 F arras* Wilbert Ernest 

5 Areas* Matt* 

6 Granger, Erik W« 

? Laatbiti* Bonald 8* 

■I 

I I [ $ try char a, Willises Alfred 

9 Koslewski* Thomas 

10 Spes«ski 9 William 

11 Rosser* William S. 

12 Saras 9 Jacob Robert 

13 Crawford;. James 3L 

14 Munree» J asses L. 

5 ; ? Yaghylan? Arthur David 



Hinh Stf: 
ftSudson 

Chelsea 
Hudson 






&Sorthbridg« 
Bartlet , Webster 
Buntington 
Haver e 

Chi cop 

Tanta . Sfcurbridga 

Technical, Springfield 



Marblshead 



Boston Latin 



Soxaaervill.!* 



So Providence 



SSiddlesest 
Suffolk 

Middlesex 
Worcester 

Worcester 
Hampshire 
Suffolk 



Hampden 
Hampden 

Suffolk 



&S8SX 



Suffolk 
Middlesex 

Bristol 



Math, 



Physics or Cham, 



Chem« 

Zoology 

Engr» 

Etkgr- 

Chem, 



Methi 



History & Gov't. 
Prennftdp 



Engr« 






Alternates 



Bennivier, Bernard Will.: at FittSfiald 



1 



5 



S to labors, James 
Bianchard, James A« 
Gage, Kenneth Soever 

Hennessey 9 Thomas 



Severe 
barren 
Malthas) 

MeMord 



BerksM 
Suffolk 
Worcester 
Middlesex 

Middlesex 



Engr 



Math* or Science 



Engr : 



i 



Furhsia**,, Allan Harvey 



English* Bos* 



!>2 



33 



Keene* Ellsworth G«* Jr. 



8 Quintal, Day id Peter 

9 Pier** Carald I 

3.0 Nevers* John Vincent 

11 Milenaki, Paul Edward 

12 Bates, Robert 

13 Chlriboga* David Anthony 

14 Lapro s Robert 

15 Tryba* Joseph 

16 Bui lea* Robert K. 

17 Babln* James 



8 Gray 9 Alden J a 

Greece* Michael No 

Temkin* Robert Harvey 

21 ?k>pper« Thomas Gordon 

22 McNeeley, Stephen 

23 Campbell » Kenneth John 

24 Theroux* William 

25 Smith* Edward P. 

76 Walton* Frederick U«* Jr. 

t 7 McCarthy* Jama® £ c 

28 Benoit, Gordon David 

29 ?nomm* Robert Bdwsrd 
3D Cooper* Alan 

1 Hajari an* John Lee 



Kosinskl. Richard J 



Kuias* Alexander F 



Horwell 

Haver 
Norwood 
St* Mary . 
Adam® M : 
Ludlow 



Suffolk 


Physics 


Plymouth 


Liberal Arts 


£i sex 


■w <■* 


Norfolk 


Engx c 


Essex 


Math* 


Berkshire 


Math, 


Hampden 


W» A3* 


Middle-sex 


Psychology 



DR 



Ho I yoke 
Classical* %&lm 

Sosaaervil! i 



Norfolk 
Hampden 
Sssex 
Middlesex 



Sanderson Academy* AsMi eld Franklin 



Boston La 

Boston Latin 

Framingham 

High & Latin School 
ridge 

Classical* Sslerst 

Cathedral » Spr J ngf 1 el d 

En%Xi.; ton 
Plymouth 

SOBBfe: 1 © 

Dennis* . >uth Regional 

Techfij -M-^agfield 

Lynn Classical 

Rockland 

Teehni eel * Spr ingf i eld 

Hopkins Academy « Had ley 



Psychology 



Suffolk 


Physics 


Suffolk 


Government 


Middlesex 


*• 1W 


Middlesex 


Education 


Lssex 


Engr* 


Hampden 


Predated « 


Suffolk 


i« «» 


Plymouth 


Engr » 


Middlesex 


Physics 


Barnstable 


s; os 


Hampden 


Matho 


Es&ex 


Engr« 


Plymouth 


Engr 


Hampden 


Engr* 


Hampshire 


Engr, 



I 



34 
35 



Coombs, Joseph ?aul 
Keefe» Arthur J« 



Bos tort T schw 1 ea 1 



Wft6tvj< od 



Suffolk 

Horfoik 



Physics 
Math.. 



I 



f 



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Boyce s El&ine 



Cutler, Kenneth G, 



7 



isk & Joan 



CLASS OF 1961 



jor 
Mfcthevatlcs 

Economics 



Mel la, Raymond M. Civil Engineering 

Sftiskkia, Robert L. Economics 



English 



itlttrtf 



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Bristol 
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Hampden 



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Budre&ics., Irene Bacteriology 



Kellihar, Joan 
Lincoln, Prise ilia 
Hoschofi, Hichael 
Os'tek, Th&ddeus 
Zieainskl, Robert 



Education 



Business 



^latheasatics 



4-natneaBt2.cs 



Middlesex 
■rkshire 

lor folk 
re ester 

Hampden 

Berks hire 



Maynard 
Pittsfield 

Cohi&sset 

>rcester 
Chic ©pee 



CLASS OF 1963 



Burns, Ann 



Crocker., Man' 



?o«rnier. 



.tiarnsj mi 



Lord. Bruce 



Fe r reau It * Eic hard 



Liberal Arts 



Ukg 



Electrical Engineering 



Zoology 
History 



Engineering 



Horf e 



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Morfolk 



assess 



Three Sivars 

Tfeyasouth 

Line cd In 

Sharon 

Ipswich 

Saekonk 



a M 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Memorandum 



From 
To: 



apartment of Air Science Date 6 January 1960 



Department of Air 

Course of Study Committee 



Subject Changes to Curriculum, Department of Air Science 



i C * O O O 4 



c o o ♦ » • 



l e The Department of the Air Force recognizes that the substance and desired 
learning outcomes of several advanced Air Science courses so closely parallel 
those of certain courses offered in the fine arts, the humanities and the social 
sciences at this and other institutions of higher learning that the completion of 
one of the latter would satisfy a particular portion of the advanced Air Science 
curriculum. 



2 



Jith the approval of the University of Massachusetts and the Air University 
it is proposed that, in lieu of the advanced Air Science courses indicated, there 
be substituted the following courses offered by the College of Arts and Sciences 2 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 
COURSE 



1st Semester «- 

All of Air Science 51, Air 
Force Officer Development, except 
that part dealing with staff 
organization and management func*- 
tions. 

2nd Semester •» 

All of Air Science 52, Air 
Force Officer Development, except 
that part dealing with military 
justice. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
COURSE 



Junior Year 



Speech 91, Extempore Speech 



Psychology 62, Social Psychology 



Senior Year 



1st Semester •• 

All of Air Science 75, Global 
Relations, except that part deal- 
ing with weather and navigation. 



Government 53, International 
Relations 



. <" « * ,- I-' * 



•»•• »«•».*» * 4 ■ ». » V 



« 4 *■ 






> S > - * » < j « ~ v •> - 



» . » .-,. :. ■. 



I ;' 



t.x. 



2nd Semester - (If and when the university offers a course in world political 

geography) 

All of Air Science 76, Global World Political Geography 
Relations, except that part deal- 
ing with the responsibilities and 
obligations of the Air Force officer, 

3. Implementation of the above would leave with the Department of Air Science 
those subjects in the advanced Air Science curriculum (such as Military Justice) 
which are not substantially treated in any but the Departments of Military and 
Air Science at this university,, The Department of Air Science will continue to 
offer these subjects, and it is recommended that they be awarded credits as 
follows s 

Jun ior Year 

1st Semester «- 

Air Science 51, Staff Organization and Functions 

A study of staff organization and functions, with emphasis on the Air Force 
commander and his staff and the application of management principles in the Air 
Force, 

1 class hour? 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

2nd Semester - 

Air Science 52, The Military Justice System 

A study of the system by which military justice is administered} the rela- 
tionship between military and civil law. 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

Senior Year 

1st Semester *• 

Air Science 75, Weather and Navigation 

An introduction, presenting the weather and navigational aspects of airman** 
ship, such as temperature, pressure, air masses, precipitation, weather charts, 
navigational charts and dead reckoning navigation. 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 



» P, }A* ,> r << 



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**'•> 






2nd Semester «• 

Air Science 76, the Air Force Officer 

A study of Air Force administrative procedures? the responsibilities and 
obligations of the Air Force officer; and the customs, courtesies and rules of 
conduct of the armed services. 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

j 

-dbttN B« tiARCHANT Atch ^, 

Colonel, USAFj Proposed change ot 1959-60 catalog 

Head, Department of Air Science 



Proposed changes in page 124 of 1959-60 catalog 



1 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



1 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 
John C. Mar chant, Colonel, USAF, Head 

The mission of the department program is to develop in selected college 
students, through a permanent program of instruction, those qualities of leader- 
ship and other attributes essential to their progressive advancement to positions 
of Increasing responsibility as commissioned officers in the United States Air 
Force, It is not expected that all so commissioned will select the USAF as a 
career; nevertheless, the program does offer an excellent means to prepare for 
such a career* 

The first two years of instruction, the basic course, give a foundation for 
leadership and Air and Space Age citizenship* The program of the last two years, 
advanced AFROTC and four weeks of summer training at the end of the junior year, 
is designed primarily to provide officer training for those selected and quali- 
fied for flight training and for technical or administrative assignments . 

All students planning to take advanced AFROTC in their junior and senior 
years should complete Psychology 26 (prerequisite to Psychology 62) prior to 
entering the second semester of their junior year. The following courses are 
required for completion of advanced AFROTC: 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Prerequisites, Air Science 1 and 2, or Military Science 1 and 2 and permission 

of department. 

JUNIOR YEAR 

1st Semester Credits 2nd Semester Credits 

*Speech 91, Extempore Speech 3 *Psychology 62, Social Psych. 3 
Air Science 51 1 Air Science 52 1 

Prerequisites, Air Science 25 and 26 or Military Science 25 and 26, and per- 
mission of department. 

SUMMER (4 weeks) 

Summer Training Unit 

SENIOR YEAR 

1st Semester Credits 2nd Semester Credits 

♦Government 53, Int. Relations 3 Air Science 76 3 

Air Science 75 1 

♦Suggested semester. May be taken at any time prior to completion of senior year. 

Atch. 



Proposed changes in pages 221-222 of 1959-60 catalog 

AIR SCIENCE 

Colonel Marchant, PAS, Major Vinskey, Assistant PAS, Major Sprague, Assistant 
PAS, Captain Killion, Assistant PAS, Captain Costantino, Assistant PAS, 
Captain Pfeiffer, Assistant PAS, Captain Martin, Assistant PAS. 

1. (I) 2. (II) Foundations of Air Power - 1 

An introduction to the fundamentals of Air Power, to include elements of Air 
Power, basic aeronautical science, and the organization and operation of the 
military arm of the Federal Government. 

2 class hours; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

25. (I) 26. (II) Foundations of Air Power - 2 

A more advanced consideration of Air Power and the development of aerial war- 
fare, with emphasis on the basic concepts governing the employment of air forces 
and weapons systems, including operations in space. 

2 class hours; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

51. (I) Staff Organizations and Functions 

A study of staff organization and functions, with emphasis on the Air Force 
commander and his staff and the application of management principles in the USAF. 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

52. (II) The Military Justice System 

A study of the system by which military justice is administered; the relation- 
ship between military and civil law. 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 

75. (I) Ueather and Navigation 

An introduction, presenting the weather and navigational aspects of airman- 
ship, such as temperature, pressure, air masses, precipitation, weather charts, 
navigational charts and dead reckoning navigation, 

1 class hour; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 1 



76. (II) Military Aspects of Uorld Political Geogra 



phy t%?5;T^ A 



The concepts of the military aspects of political geography; maps and charts; 
factors of power; and the geographic influences upon political problems with a 
geopolitical analysis of the strategic areas. 

4 class hours; 1 laboratory hour Credit, 3 

THE DEPARTMENT 



*■ -• 



I 



REVISED ROTC AWANCED COURSE C m 



lo Objective; 



**/° 'SL 8841 ™ 1 objective o^ the course of instruct Ls to produce junior 
officers who, by their education* training^ said inherent qualities suited for 

continued development as officers in the totted States A and responsible 
American citizens,, The aim is to provide a basic milit education, and in con- 
^J?*^? other college disciplines to develop -indi il characteristics am 
attributes essential -to an officer and citisen 

b« Although the advance course is elective, only » students possessing c 
standing military and scholastic aptitude and daaonstrai sound I character are 
selected, Students taking the advance course' will attend a six week sumner proa 
between the junior and senior years 

^ c„ The revised advance course curriculum as outlined herein has identical ol 
. jectives with the present program. It is modified by r ing the militarv contact 
hours ^ in the relegation of certain subjects of a "hardware" nature to the summer 
training period^ and by improving the academic content of the -militarv curriculv- 
in addition it requires the student to take certain ass 1 subieots which will in- 
crease the potential value of the future officer by broadening the scope of his aca- 
demic training*, 

2 Discussion 5 

a„ The revised curriculum requires the student, to set mil take 45 eonta 
hours, of academic study in both -hie junior and senior y the following m - 
oral areas? & s 

(1) Kffeetive cos sation* 

(2) Science comprehension o 

(3) General psychology. 

(4) Political development and political ii .utionso 

^See Tab B for comparison of programs ar a detailed discussi<v 

the revised course and seope«» 

b c The Department of Military Science has select* ! ademic elective* from i 
broad general fields listed above which allow the stud© n t of latitude 

and fLaJaMlif.v. 'Phes, malni** ««»««»«, ~.& <2.i,.*~ ..™„...,...* j. j _ A _ 



'row 



Co At the present time only about 50 students in 
years are accepted as advanced cadets* 

*i4 + ° ^° revised curriculum require [20 contact hours 

military instruction per yes ,r summer w 

senior year as compared to the c com 

military^ by 60 p®r year^ 45 sh the e 
demic subject » 



I 



So It is felt that the pr . 
advanced course should continue 
itary contact hours p@r year plus 



credit allocation of 6' hours 
effect based upon ai. average 
28k hours summer workshop cour 



per year for* the 
120 actual mil- 




mm: 



TAB A « Credit* 

TAB B * Comparison of old and new. curricula. 



TAB C « Academic subjects acceptable to the Military 
? ■ Scope of courses. 
Catalog 'Changeso 



TAB I 
TAB E 






I 



TAB A 



CREDIT FOR ROTC 



1g Any discussion of credit for the Army ROTC curriculum should consider as one 
of its aspects the disparity between the Air Force program end the Army program* 
This is best explained by quoting from a letter written by the Commanding General, 
United States Continental Array s which states? "Differences in Department of the 
Army and Department of tbg Air Force positions relative to compulsory versus elee* 
tive ROTE and the curriculum content of their respective programs stems from basic 
differences in the roles and missions of each service* The newly commissioned Air 
Force officer incurs a 5 year active duty obligation, 1*6,, 12 to 15 months flight 
training plus approximately a h year tour of active duty, as opposed to the array 
requirement for a two 2rear active duty^ or 6 months ACDUTRA (Active Duty for Train- 
ing) obligation which Includes attendance at his service school* Thus, the Air 
Force has adequate time to train their personnel on active duty While the Army is 
desirou3 of sec faring officers fairly well qualified at the time they report for 
duty 9 Uniformity between service curricula cannot be achieved for the sake of 
uniformity alone <»" 



2o The military curriculum under the revised program requires of the student 120 
contact hours of military instruction, This^ of course, represents more than the 
average university subject of 90 contact hours per year for the same 6 credits. In 
addition the military student attends a summer workshop of 28U contact hours between 
his junior and senior years for which he receives no university credit. 



3« 



The revision reduces the student's military contact hours, considerable, it should 
be reemphasi^ed that this is time acquired through eliminating portions of the cur^ 
riculum and placing emphasis on more meaningful areas within the program. As always, 
policies and techniques reflecting technological change and. development will necess<» 
it ate constant intredepartmental curriculum study and revision,, 

h v Based on the contact hours which the military student receives,;, and by' placing 
more emphasis on the meaningful areas within the program, it is strongly recommended 
thatthe present 6 credits per jbbt remain in effect , and placing more emphasis on 
the more meaningful areas* 



I 



1 



I 



TAB B COMPARISON OF CURRICULA ~ ADVANCE COURSE ARMOR 
Xo Junior Class 

&«. Subject Present Cour. 

Leadership ID hrs 10 hrs 

Military Teaching 20 hrs 20 hrs 

leadership lab 60 hrs 45 hrs 

History of Armor 2 hrs hrs * 

Armor Actios 24 hrs 45 hrs 

Armor Communications 20 hrs hrs * 

Hedntenaneo and Driver Training 20 hrs hrs * 

3tenk Gunnery 18 hrs hrs * 

Organisation of Arzsor 6 hrs hrs ® 

Academic Subject hrs 45 hrs 



OTAL 180 hrs 165 hrs (120 



b Significant differences: 

(1) Increase in armor tactics by 21 hours in the new course© 

(2) Addition to the new course of & 45 hour academic elective* 

(3) A. reduction in. leadership laboratory, which is primarily drills from 
60 to 45 hours o 

* (4) The deletion of. 66 hours of "hardware" (denoted by *) as specific 

subjects in the new course*, These subjects are new -introduced into the 
course on -a greatly reduced scale 9 using the . integration method -of 
presentation in the units on tactics beginning in the sophomore year 
It is ecspected that, the de^emphssis of this type of instruction during 
the academic year will give the course added interest and will insure 
that the quality of subject material being taught is at the university 
levelo Details of the methods and technique to be employed are cover- 
ed in inclosure ;* to this fab* 

2 Senior Class 

a Subject Present (Sours® Proposed Course 

orations ' hrs 15 hrs . 






c 



logistics 

Array Administration :; hrs 15 hrs 

Military Justice 15 hrs 15. hrs 

Service Orientation 16 bra 

(1) Role of m 

(2) Officer Indoctrination 

Leadership lab _ ) hrs 45 hrs 

Organization and employment of Armor (Tactics) IS hr© hrs 

Maintenance and driving review 2 hrs hrs 

Tank Gunnery Review 2 hrs lire 

Gommunic&tions Review 2 hrs. lire 

Academic Subject hrs hrs 

TOTAL hrs 165 hrs 



(120 railita 



TAB B (Contd) 

b Significant differences; 

(1) A reduction by 20 hours of instruction in 'operations * ' per se 3 as 
an isolated sub«course in the proposed program* 

(2) A reduction by 5 hours of instruction in logistics per s©° as an 
isolated sub«course in the new course,, 

(3) An increase by 5 hours in array administration in the new course*, This 
is a field in which the young officer is involved inn tely upon graduation and 
in which he will be Involved throughout his career o It 'will also benefit him per- 
sonally, in that Arny administrative methods are not radically different from 
business practiceso 

(4) A reduction by 1 hour in service orientation which is of minor conse- 
quence,, 

(5) Elimination of an entire series of course: ich were in the nature of 
reviews , a total of 24 hours This is material which will be reviewed in the 

service schools ^ subsequent to the student's commissioning* and is felt to be &ip®r<=» 
fluous to the ROTC curriculum in the new program for the senior year© 

(6) An addition of U5 hours of academic Instruction designed to broaden the 
education of the student 

(7) lo offset the loss of 25 hours in th© study of operations and logistics* 
two vital aspects of th© military education* th® Army hss authorised us to combine 
15 hours of operations^ 15 hours of logistics and 5 hours of officer indoctrination 
into a 35 hour tactics course This we will do as outlined an Inclosure #1 to this 

A reduction of 15 hours in leadership laboratory <> 



INCL #1 * Tactics, 



« 



I 



I 



I 



TACTICS COMMITTEE 

lo Purpose: The purpose of this directive is to provide criteria and guidance for 
the establishment and conduct of Tactics Courses to scphoraores, juniors and seniors * 
This directive implements a tactics committee to insure uniformity, continuity and 
progressivenese of instruction,, 

2 Tactics Committee: 

a* Compositions The tactics committee will consist of 4 officers and 2 non- 
commissioned officers o 

b© Responsibility: 

(1) Formulate a tactile course for sophomores consisting of 30 hours of 
instruction o 

(2) Formulate a tactics course for juniors consisting of' 45 hours of 
instruction o 

(3) Formulate a tactics course for seniors c< -'ting of 35 hours of 
instruction o 

(4) Prepare lesson plans for each unit of instruction which will be us< 
for that unit of instruction regardless of the instrr assigned This will in- 
sure uniformity of instruction 

(5) Prepare tests and quizzes for each class (sophomores, juniors, seniors) 
which again will insure uniformity c 

(6) Submit lesson plans and quizzes to the Operations Officer for approval 
at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the first class o 

3© Planning Guidance: 

a ffl . Sophomore Tactics: 

fa) 'Objectives: To teach the student the history of armor, armor org&sii~> 
zation and material, and to introduce the student to armor communication To teach 
the basic fundamentals of amor employment, emphasizing the combined arms team 

(^) §£2B£ : History of armor , to include its origin, roles and' development 
Discussion of the organization, missions and capabilities of the tank and armored 
rifle battalions, emphasising organisation of tank anc, armored rifle companies -and ' 
platoons o Introduction to armor material, to include araaor vehicles, their char- 
acteristics, armament, capabilities and limitations Mechanical training, care 
and cleaning of tank mounted machine guns, amor communication, radio operation 
and maintenance, and introduction to radio~teX@pho.ne procedure,, Basic tactical; 
formations and empiojpment of the individual tank, tank section, rifle and machine 
gun squad* and tank and anaored rifle platoons, and basic combined arms teams The 
requesting and use of supporting fires 

(3) Training Guidance : 

(a) This course represents the beginning of a 110 hour course in tac- 
tics, therefor it is essential that the fundamentals be taught at this time is 
suggested that msadmum emphasis be placed on platoon level estimates and orde;. 

(b) All "hardware" subjects should be ta : as integrated subjects 
with main theme being the tactical employment of small units,, as an examples the 
class is being taught troop leading procedure » As an illustration the platoon 
leader Cheeks his communications facilities© At this time the various radios and 
their characteristics can be discussed* The same app to the tank mounted machine 
gunso 

INCLQSURE #1 to TAB B 



1 



I 



I 



INCLOSUKE #1 to TAB 8 (Contd) 

(c) As junior tactics starts with the n phase 5 only the essen- 
tial elements of platoon basic tactics should be taught here to serve as a stari 
ing point for the advanced tactics to follow*, 

(d) Combined arms team principles should be taught end emphasized 
throughout the course where feasible 

b Junior Tactics: 

CO G^JecU^Tes: To teach the student 'the organisation* roles and equi 
stent of the armored cavalry platoon and troop To te the student tactical 
employment of the tank and armored rifle platoon and ; and armored rifle team 
To teach tank gunnery fundamentals and material »- To ■.liarise the student with 
basic vehicles ' lb continue the study of armor communications) To snd the course 
with a brief unit on the ejsployaent and tank and armored rifle battalions o 

(2) §£gj3ej Organization^ roles and equipment o the armored cavalry 
platoon and troop© Discussion of the role of infant: ivision armor units The 
tactical employment of the tank and armored rifle platoons and armored rifle, .and 
tank teams in offensive* defensive and retrograde odd its* A brief unit on. em- 
ployment of the tank and armored rifle battalion* armor communications* -to include 
radiotelephone procedure and supplemental means of o ition c Familiar 

tion with basic vehicles Tank gunnery material and. I ale to include : 
ret familiarisation* functioning and servicing of the main tank gun, ammo, reiv 
determination s conduct of fire 3 range cards* crew drill and preliminary non«firing 
-exercises* mechanical training and familiarization firing of the .»45 caliber pistole 

(3) Training Guidance; 

{&} It is recommended that no more than one fourth of the course 
devoted to ^hardware" exclusively, i»e A * o45 cal pistol training* and gunnery a (12 
hours total). 

(b) .Maxftssum integration of as much of the "hardware" subject material 
as possibleo This is particularly applicable to such subjects as coBB&unications* 
range cards* and vehicles* to include the employment of the combined arms team and 
the use of supporting fires© 

(c) Training must be progressive* and will begin with a short revis 
of essential tactical subjects previously taught in the sophomore year and wo: 
progressively up to the battalion levels 

(d) Armored Cavalry (recon) should be tau a© a separate sub-unit as 
distinct from tank &n& armored rifle instruction 

So Senior tactics; 

CO ^Jgctives* To provide an imderstar- staff organization r 
the division staff as a modelc Staff duties * forms ds* reports* estimate 
plans and orders of the battalion staff To teach the student to arrive at sound 
decisions and transmit those decisions into combat ordc I the battalion le 
To teach the value of military intelligence and methods of producing and using 
intelligence o To provide the student with the fundam nowledge of supply and 
the movement of small units 

(2) Seoge; Staff organization and functions division staff 
a irsodel^ relationship between commanders and their staffs* staff planning* sta 
forms. and reports; stress functioning of the armor b; : staff in combat sit* 
nations o ' Estimates of the situation as a process of Lving at sound decisi 
Military intelligence* stressing the principles of combat intelligence ; , use 
intelligence in operational planning* steps in the production of combat intelli» 
gensejj counterintelligence and safeguarding military . ion* composition mid 

2 



I 



IKCIDSURE #1 to TAB B (Contd) 

w S *!S ° f th t a ff >r ba ^ ali ^ tas ^ *brce and its employment- in , enpfaaais- 
tog task organisation, planning, liaison and coordination which a pessary for 

success in ^war. Duties and responsibilities of company and bait . D officers in 

tr&2^3ng, training record©, reports,, supervision of training and technique of 

scheduling* Practical work in preparation of a ©quad tactical aaoereiaa and in vr®- 

paring f ^ } ^^ ustin £ th@ aeto * ^ steulated firing on a rifle range. ' 

. „ ft . W ™»s course represents the culsdnation of a course in tactics that 

.l^JfTT * +}*?? \ Ba ? ed 0n thia it is •fisential that this unit of instruction 

consider the battalion level a© its primary sphere of interest o 

(b; lecture instruction should be held to an absolute rainimuao 

(c) A continuing situation type unit of instruction should b® conducted 

5 sfT^f wicms •&«*** of training as it goes along thui aiding blocks 



of S3 or S4» 



"**■*. *^«rf* v*. *.#*$. « _ : ■ -*>im ^ 

(d) Preparation for and actual conduct of a rif: mge should be turned 
over to the senior cadets early in the year with instruction Prepare for and 

fire the 1uniftT» rarfafa ^Srv tesw 



fire the junior cadets in May 



o^ 



I 



I 



TAB C ACADEMIC St 

1 Arroy Training Program 145- ;&ry c© 

and specifies that in lieu there oh poter m 

each years*; J froa the folic fields* 

student « 8 ec on by restricting his? choice to a m. or 9 

The election. . a stutert a based on the gui< M a 

faculty advis 

a c Effet Cozamunicationc 

b Scien ; < )mpr@heji n» 

Co General Psychologic 

d„ Political Developtaent and Political Institutions* 

2* Based on guidance furnished by Department of t 

Onivera ' frfessae.; bs, the following subjects « , a » 

-ctive sub, for x >d cadets?. 

a * Bus^ on (pag xatalo 

(lj - Introduction to Accounting I 

(2) 26 « Introduction to Accounting 3 

(3) 27' « Introduction to Accounting 

(4) 61 - Intenr 3 Accounts 

(5) 62 - Advanc ^counting 

(6) 63 «- Cosl 

(?) 64 - Advanced Cost Accounting 

(6) 72 » Administrative / ,ag ar- 
(9). 74 « Advanced h< 

LO) 7? - km i ig 

.^sneral Busi 

(1) 70 ^.Business 1; 

(2) 72 •--> Business Law 

(3) 55 «> -Financial ! 

(4) 75 ** General Insurance 
(5). 76 - life' 

nciples of mm 

(7) 64 - Person :anent 

Co Economics (page atalog 

fi4 ^ Cc. , 3iS 



■do Education (page ] 

66 - Preparation and 

e-o Civil Engineering (page 16 

j 

f o. English (page 179 , cat 
» 82 « Great i 
leal \ 

go Genaan 

(1) 3 - 5 - 

(2) 2$ = 26 

(3) - Scient 



TAB Q (Contd) 

(4) 58 - Middle High German 

) 79 " ^0 Gern&n Conversation and. Composition 

ho (kwemsenfc (page 19$* catalog) 

(1) 51 ■» M&nieipal Government 

(2) 52 <=> American Foreign Policy 

(3) 53 International Relations 

(4) 5? °» The Gove- it and Politics of Russia 

(5) Public AdBdniatration 61 

(6) 63 - Political Parties and Elections 

(7) 65 » Constitutional law 
((<) 66 - American Political Thought 
(9) 70 - Intern. al Organisation 

?2 -' Modern Political Thongl 

.) 73 ■* Cor i [kwernoMkit 

(12) *F4 -! Comparative Political Parties and politics 

(13) Public Personnel Administration (83) 

io History , (page 202 ~ catalog) 

(1) 53 - & r History ©f 5&r B&s1 

(2) 56 «? History of Russia 

(3) 5? - 58 Hispanic^American History 
i) 63 « 64 History of American 
5) 6-6 - The tory of Modern iy 

(6) 70 ~ Europe Sine© 1910 

(7) ?2 - History of American Westward :.on 5 1 

(8) 77 - ifcdern Britain 

(9) 7$ - France Since 1789 
,)) 82, - m - Diplomatic History >j the /■■ .' fcates 

j.o journalism (pars 523^ catalog) 

(1) 75 «*»-N«ws c iication 

(2) 86 «• F« Article Writ?: 

B&theuatics (page 21S S catalog) 
(1) 12 ■?■> Function al Mithematios 
'(2) 29 - Galenlns I 

(3) 30 - Calculus II 
(4} 31 ~ Appli": line for Engineers I 

(5) 32 «• Applied Calculus for Engine 

(6) 51 « M ratry 

(7) 53 - 54 - Higher Algebra 

(8) 55 & ISstthoBiatiCB of Finance 

(9) 56 «• Finite Distances and Llity 

(10) 63 * Statistics I 

(11) 64 - Statistics IX 

(12) 91 - intermediate Calculi: 

(13) 93 - Advanced Galenlus 1 
(lit) 94 ~ Advanced Calculus II 

l.o Philosophy (page 22B S catalog) 

(1) 31 - Introduction to logic and Scieni 

(2) 42 - Social and Personal Ethics 



TAB C (Contd) 

(3) 61 « Contemporary Philosophies 

(4) 68 - Oriental Philosophies 

(5) 75 - Symbolic Logic 

m* Physics (page 237, catalog) 

(1) 51 • 52 - Electricity and Magnetism 

(2) 54 - Heterology 

(3) 55 - 56 - Mechanics 

(4) 6l - Heat end Thermodynamics 

(5) 63 - 64 - Optics 

(6) 66 * Kinetic Theory 

(?) 6? *> Statistical Mechanics and Information Theory 

(8) 85 - 86 ~ Modern Physics 

(9) $$ « Solid State Physics 
(10) » Gaseous Electronics 

n P Psychology (pag© 241* catalog) 

(1) 51 - Sensory and Jfctivated Processes 

(2) 52 « Learning and Thinking 

(3) 56 - Educational Psychology 

(4) 61 - Social Psychology I 
(5 5 62 ~ Social Psychology II 
(6) 79 - Personality 
(?) 86 » Industrial Psyeholo^r 

(8) 88 «. Psychology of Guidance 

[9) 93 - Psychology of Adolescence 



Oo French (page 246^ catalog) 

(1) 1 « 2 - Elementary French 

(2) 5 -». 6-.~ Intermediate French 

(3) 7 ~ 'Intermediate French, French Life and Culture 

(4) 8-~ Intermediate Franco^ French I$fe and. Culture 

(5) 27 - Oral Practice 

Po Italian (page 24S, catalog) 

(1) 1 - 2 - Elementary Italian 

(2) 5 ~ 6 - Intermediate Italian 

(3) 2? - 2$ -Oral Italian 

q<> Spanish (page 248, catalog) 
(1) 1 — 2 - Elementary Spanish 
.(2) 5 « 6 - Intermediate Spanish 

(3) 7 - intermediate Spanish: Hispanic Culture 1 

(4) 8 - Intermediate Spanish? Hispanic Culture 11 

(5) 27 - 28 - Oral Spanish 

r a Russian (page 250 s catalog) 

(1) 1 « 2 « EXementary Russian. 

(2) 5 - 6 . Intermediate Russian 



So Sociology (page 252 , catalog 

(1) 61 « Population Problems 

(2) 68 » Industrial Sociology 

(3) 78 - Crimlnolo, 



TAB C (Contd) 

t Anthropology (page 253 $ catalog) 

(1) 63 - Social Anthropology 

(2) 64 - Proglems in Anthropology 

(3) 65 ■» Ethnographic Survey ©f Mon«liierai@ Peoples 

(4) 66 - The Individual and His Society 

Uo Speech (page 254 # catalog) 

(1) 91 - Extempore Speech 1 and 11 

(2) 92 - Discussion 

(3) 93 =» Argumentation and Debate 
94 — Persuasion 



Interdepartmental Coiarses (page 260^ catalog) 
(1) Social Science 60 - Africa South of the Sahara 
Social Science 69 - India and Southeast Asia 



I 



TAB D - SCOPE OF COURSES - REVISED COURSE 



I 



1 JUNIOR TEAR 

a Leadership (10 hours) - Responsibilities and basic qualities of a leaders 
human behavior and adjustment to Army life| objectives of leadership; leadership 
principles; leadership techniques; functions of the leader, and special problems 
of military leadership 

b<> Military Teaching Principles (20 hours) - Educatiimal psychology as P 8 **** 
tains to the five stages of instruction techniques and the importance of each; 
techniques used in planning and presenting instruction; speech techniques for the 
instructor; the construction and use of training aids; methods of instruction used 
in training; and use of tests to evaluate results of instruction; a practical phase 
wherein the stuient will be required to prepare and present lessons 

Co Branch Tactics and Techniques (45 hours) - Organization, roles and equipment 
of the armored cavalry platoon and troop D Discussion of the role of the infantry 
division armor units The tactical employment of the tank and armored rifle platoons 
and armored rifle and tank temas in offensive , defensive, and retrograde movement s 
A brief unit on employment of the tank and ormored rifle battalion , armor communi- 
cations, to include radio-telephone procedure , and supplemental means of communi- 
cation Familiarization with basic vehicles , tank gunner material and fundamentals, 
to include turret familiarization, functioning and servicing the main tank gua 5 
ammunition, range determination, range cards , crew drill, and preliminary non~firing 
exercises; mechanical training and familiarisation firing of the <>45 caliber pistolo 
Details on initiation fo this subject can be found in Inclo 1, Tab B, of this study,, 

do Leadership Laboratory (45 hours) - Definition of and necessity for discipline, 
military courtesy, and customs of the service , wearing of the uniform, duties of the 
soldier with emphasis on the functions, duties and responsibilities of the non-com- 
missioned officer and junior commissioned officers; characteristics of military com- 
stands and orders o Drill for foot troops - squad, platoon, company, battalion and 
combat command; ceremonies and inspections Special attention will be given to 
fur ther development of leadership potential by requiring the student to participate 
in the planning and conduct of drills and ceremonies «, 

e Academic subject (45 hours per year) -See Tab C for details 
2 SENIOR YEAR 

a© Tactics (35 hours) - Consisting of operations ^ logistics and service 
orientation, as explained in Tab B); staff organization and functions, using the 
division staff as a model; relationships between commanders and their staffs; staff 
planning, staff forms and reports; stress functioning of the armor battalion staff 
in combat situations Estimates of the situation as a process of arriving at sound 
decisions* Military intelligence, stressing the principles of combat intelligence 
use of intelligence in operational planning , steps in the production of combat 
intelligence, counterintelligence, and safeguarding military information Compo= 
sition and missions of the armor battalion task force and its employment in combat, 
emphasising task organization, planning, liaison and coordination which are neces- 
sary for success in war c Duties and respcnsibilit lea of company and battalion 
officers in training, training records, reports, supervision of training and 

1 






M it 






technique of scheduling Practical works in the preparation of squad tactical 
exercises* and in preparing for the conducting the actual or simulated firing 
one rifle range 

bo Army Administration (15 hours) - The role of the officer in unit admin- 
istration to include familiarization with Department of the Amy publications and 
index system; purpose and use of the soldier's and officer 8 s qualification records; 
unit punishment record! individual sick slip; duty roster; morning report; pay and 
allowances; company correspondence and funds; familiarization with duties of com- 
pany administrative personnel,; Boards of Officers; mess management o 

c Military Law (15 hours) - Foundations* basic principles and scope of 
military law; the articles of the Uniform Code of Military Justice; nonjudicial 
punishment; composition and jurisdiction of military courts; measures taken in 
apprehension and pre-trial restraint j pre-trial investigation; important e3.ements 
of certain offenses; preparation and forwarding of charge sheets; basic trial 
procedure; elements of evidence; reviews and appeals; sentences and punishments; 
courts ^-martial records; conduct of a mock court 

do Hole of the United States in World Affairs (10 hours) - Specific analysis 
of the United States as to its economic power.; war potential* its inclination and 
aptitude for the conduct of war as conditioned by size^ geographic location* terrain* 
water barriers and climate; adequacy anc control of communications and trade routes 
A specific analysis covering the material above will be presented on each of the 
following; Soviet Union, Far East* Middle East and the Western Hemisphere* 

e Leadership Laboratory (45 hours) - Basically the same as listed for the 
junior class in this tab* but with Increased emphasis on the actual performance and 
supervisory ability of the student in positions of responsibility normally occupied 
by commissioned officers 

fc, Academic Subject (45 hours per jea,r) - See Tab C for details o 



n 



i 



TAB E ~ AMENDMENTS TO- THE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Colonel Weaver. PMST 5 Major Huff , Asst FM5T, Major Sacra, Asst PMST; Captain 
Phillips, Asst PMST 5 Captain Howden, Asst PMST? Captain Hathaway, Asst PMSTj 
Captain Murray, Asst PMST, Captain Lesley, Asst PMST5 Captain Williams, Asst PMST 
Captain Wilson, Asst PMST C 



51o (I) 52o (II) 

Theoretical and practical instruction in command 'and leadership of small units; 
sailitary teaching principles 1 armor tactics; organization^ roles and equipment of 
reconnaissance ssid armor unit 3 ^ emphasising the role of the ces^psny; employment ©f 
armor combined arms teams in offensive^ defensive and retrograde movements; troop 
leading^ armor communications! maintenance and driving! gunneryi leadership and, 
drill s and the exercise of commando 4 scheduled hours 

Credit 3 

75 (I) ?6o (II) 

Theoretical and practical instruction in military administration, Military 
Law , courts $n& boards! command and staff relationships, and staff procedure sad 
organisation 5 combat intelligence, its procurement and its usesf fundament ale of 
logistics and movement of small units; armor tactics to emphasise the battalion 
level in combat situations, estimates of the situation and combat orders 5 responsi- 
bilities of company and battalion officers; training management; practical work 
in preparing tactical exercises and conduct of ranges; leadership , drill and the 
exercise of command; strategic analysis of the United States 4a world affairs 
4 scheduled hours 

Credit 3 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
May 24, 1960, 12 noon, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brett, Brown, 
Crowley, Fox, Haigis, Healey, 
Hoftyzer, Kiernan, McNamara, 
Puraphret, Schuck, Sullivan, 
Whitmore. Also, Secretary 
Gillespie, Provost McCune, 
Treasurer Johnson and Mr. Lichterman 

All the provisions of Chapter 629 of the Acts of 1958 
having been complied with, the Chairman called the meeting to order 

The minutes of the meeting of April 26 were approved as 
distributed. 

Chairman Whitmore of the Buildings and Grounds Committee 

reported on committee action taken May 24, 1960. On motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To approve the five-year capital outlay 
program as set forth in Attachment A to 
these minutes and hereby made a part of 
these minutes. 

Trustee whitmore discussed the offer of the Commissioner 

of Administration to hire some consulting architects to advise 

Trustees. On recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds and on motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To authorize the Buildings and Grounds 

Committee to draw up a statement defining 
what the consulting architects are to do, 
to circulate the statement among the 
Trustees for approval, and to urge the 
Commissioner of Administration to appoint 
three architects from the list set forth 
in the minutes of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee meeting on May 24, 1960. 

Trustee Brett discussed the status of dormitory con- 
struction by the University of Massachusetts Building Association 



2173 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Architects 



2174 



TRUSTEE 



Resolution 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the light of recent Supreme Judicial Court decision. On 

recommendation of the Buildings and Grounds Committee and on 

motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the following resolution: 

"Whereas the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court 
in Ayer v. Commissioner which held unconstitutional the 
act (Chapter 603, Acts of 1958) creating the State Office 
Building Association has cast considerable doubt on the 
legality of the outstanding obligations of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Building Association and has made 
it impossible for the Corporation to sell additional 
bonds and to continue its normal operation, now therefore, 
be it resolved 

"To solicit the assistance of the Governor of the 
Commonwealth in remedying this serious situation. It 
is respectfully suggested that the following courses 
of action be taken to preserve the integrity of the 
Association's obligations now outstanding and to avoid 
the necessity of further curtailing the badly needed 
expansion of the University as previously planned and 
be it further resolved 

"That the Commonwealth itself or by a public 
authority or in a manner decreed by the Legislature 
in its wisdom irrevocably assume and undertake to pay 
or cause to be paid as when due from time to time the 
principal and interest on the serial bonds of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Association hereto- 
fore issued and now outstanding together with the in- 
cidental charges payable by the said Association as 
provided in the trust indenture securing said bond. 
(A suggested form of bill to accomplish this result 
has already been submitted to the Commissioner of 
Administration and Finance.)" 

Trustee Sullivan wished to be recorded as voting against 
the resolution. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the following resolution: 



I 



TRUSTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



"Whereas the decision of the Supreme Judicial Court 
in Ayer v. Commissioner which held unconstitutional the 
act (Chapter 603, Acts of 1958) creating the State Office 
Building Association has cast considerable doubt on the 
legality of the outstanding obligations of the University 
of Massachusetts Building Association and has made it im- 
possible for the Corporation to sell additional bonds and 
to continue its normal operation, now therefore, be it 
resolved 

"That there be included in the capital outlay program 
for the fiscal year 1961 the total additional sum of 
$7,700,000 made up as follows: (a) $2,300,000 to cover 
the cost of plans, construction cost and furnishings for 
two dormitories for which working drawings already approved 
by the Board of Trustees are completed and immediately 
available to house approximately 590 students and to be 
ready for occupancy in September 1961. (b) $3,500,000 for 
plans, construction cost and furnishings for housing of 
approximately 1,000 students to be ready for occupancy in 
September 1962. (c) $1,900,000 for plans, construction 
cost, furnishings and kitchen equipment for a new dining 
hall to accommodate the increased enrollment to be made 
possible by the dormitory expansion above recommended. 
($110,000 of this amount to cover plans only has already 
been included in the capital outlay program for 1961) 

"It should be kept in mind also that a program of this 
size will necessitate the employment of additional personnel 
which should be provided in the operational budget. 

"The Trustees recognize the fact that this will not 
be an easy program to carry out on time but due to the 
pressure for admission, we believe that every possible 
effort should be made to meet it." 

There were no dissenting votes. 

On recommendation of the Provost and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To make the appointments, promotions and other 
personnel actions included in the list entitled 
Attachment B which is attached to these minutes 
and hereby made a part of these minutes. 

Provost McCune announced that the Ford Foundation had 
awarded the University of Massachusetts $85,000 for a five-year pro- 
gram in practical politics. On his recommendation and on motion 
duly made and seconded, it was 



2175 



Resolution 



Personnel 
Actions 



Ford 
Foundation 



2176 



Visiting 
Lecturers 



TRUSTEE 



Gift 



Shannon 
McCune 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To appoint Ralph Edward Flanders and 
Dennis Joseph Roberts as visiting 
distinguished lecturers in public 
affairs for the academic year 1960-61 
at honoraria of $10,000 each. 

On motion duly made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To accept a gift of $900 from Mrs. John 
S. Ames to purchase an animal at the 
Langwater Dispersal. 

On recommendation of the Secretary and on motion duly 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize Provost Shannon McCune during 
the time he is performing the duties of 
President of the University of Massachusetts 
and in accordance with Chapter 75, Section 
5 of the General Laws, to sign the schedule 
of expenditures of the University of 
Massachusetts. 

On recommendation of the Provost and on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To change the requirements for armored 
ROTC as contained in Attachment D to 
the minutes of April 26, 1960 from 6 
credit hours per year to 4 credit hours 
per year. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 




Secretary 



m? 24, 1900 



UOTEESXXt Cr MAS;". l^XXH 



Bvmmy o£ Capital Outlay Psograa 



fiscal 



.ted €o«t 



T Wi irg> W M l »»M tfft" < ^ t^*^'WWWWW|W3MwrrtW.. 



1961' Sept* l§60 • S»400 E*5,4i»5 



!«r©I 3 
t &. 

>Heg«j . scent Ml 

?opttX&fci©» Col IMittgs 

18-25. Yr, Ol^s Pojpu'iafcion 3fc«ec»t ©orws. Bomitcsrfe 



2*4 $X?,421,000 | 5, 800 „ COS 



1962 Se^ta 1961 - 7,000 286,' 



2.4 



013,000 3*500., C." 



tf63 



i. 1962 - &,000 29®,* 



*» • / 



s^ea^eeo 3 ft «ao/>. 



Sept« 1963 - 9, 



303, ISS 



3,0 



7 ,016,06 • 3 S ?<K>,000 



i%5 Sept, 1964 - 10,000 316,435 



<$ adS 



S^^lOvOiM 



3«800.,QOO 



«* 5 **W«# ;, 



196$ S«pt. 196S - ll»W0 337,184 



«5 * to- 



5*400*000 ; ;••>..■■. ;hX 



i*-<w >» « aTtfK T)i*wti w» »<^.»iwitt3K^^ w*f*rtMws*Mw*»?w»«ite,m«L^^ 



Tot$] 



$&3..»@43,080 4,30O ; 



Total - laeltadiiag Dondtorii $&3 S 1 



This prograai £ ;ed oa fci ■■.: santleu-. of the 

existing r;uti;leultta of the SJaiv46* ; .■;:.. to aaaaftl 

ar&vlo*? by th« Tsruef i the flexibility el 5 a&IIkjs &t nedifyJ 

«&scei",to»al p^ogsrasis as may ■ Board of Trustees. 



II of M 



1- a 



: 



■ 



.■■ 



Hoi 

at ?,MQ $2,300,000 

ISoub lag 5 ; 

or Bm roilsont $ 8 §§0 



• . an imnnnHi 



" 8. 



$3*800.000 



V"* J 



Includes fun ' i sad plans Cor 

Septeafcor 1.963 domlt s, Thnse don i vies 

will be salf-liq ig fro® sfcudsnt rentals 

paid to Stat® t &ir®r« 



4, 



iieilMPSS 



, 8 900 9 00C 



Present feeilitiass are Inadequate for the 
eazelln&nit * illdlng vill he self 1 * 

liquidating fey rsatals paid to Stat© TzreMNHrer. 

mea Center Section i «■ la addition to Federal 3 S 533,000 

Funds 
*o eo$spl.©te the Science Center by providing 

m ace 



f'fi^al. 






*•&><? 3 er 



gj s ess. 



Addition to Physics Building 



© 



2,100,000 



Present building Is inadequate due to enroll* 
tsent increase. 



Addition to ft! lit 



Continuation of steera* electric 
swerage utilities program to serve n@v 

atruotures * 



6. 



CleserooB ami! Offices * School of Business 



stref 



increased c loent* 



7, 



hysxo* 



sation Buiiains rer Me 



Physical id fey fresteen 

aui septs ilitlea will i 

)^ie iner< at* 



2,992*®%® 



l&fewrall Keeeureee Building 



To house ftepertieent 
Wildlife Masages&n 
present buildings 
unsafe* 



for 



1,350,000 



; 



UofH 



«gw%MW=a»5>«tiMtf'rt'(s ir-irJ&fv 



v - ■ ■: 






to Feed Technology Building - t 
atiAltlaa, to Federal Wis • 



$1*50 



T<e &©ca« increase ' : arellmest £or 

im&TKc mA eeaearch in the £ield ei 

£©©d processing. 

Fina Arts liiildi 

lsste^eti©si3i facilities for Fine kttn 
ineltidi&g pal : ing* sculpture, drao 

3»$ie, ®f»C5 6 

E^giaessriag i ifeg atsd fevise Building 



Isp&rifsest 8€a£ien essential fto pssait 
the Sehool of £ogia& 
instruction is vari 

e&8laea?ifkg at tfaa 

graduate te?@l* 



.3 to Off®' 
brandies o£ 
itasrgradaAta md 



1, 915,000 



$23,121,000 



: 



U of H 

Pri- 



Slo» 






9 

4» < 









196 TSo Im located dix-sctly 

i Bali, prow tug 



subjects* 

Scffsltor 

furnishings.. I i 

$# r 

Stocassairy to loci neat t® 

9*000 a fc$mh®n: 196. 

¥he6« dova qs will fe© sel£*l£ ;.ag 

£r«B student | i .surer, 



';:-;' 



i 



3 



T® provide stoan, mla&tric 9 water and sewer 
s«?viceo to new buildings. 

4. Peultsy Planar Laboratety aad Buildings 

To be cost-: ! a Tillsoa Fasts, replacing 

existing i i r«8 ©a aata conpus. Iss@at.ial, 

to provide; reos? fer prog.; I structures* 

5, Physical Idmeaiios and .-diag 

re : ; it ©£ facilities £z<m Mmmi field .tad 

i . Field is neessimvy £© 

raw • star 

©I E 'm tli 

p£-- : . ■ i on the 



400,000 



2* 



700,000 






; if 



g 



,.r •# « <:. 



T,- 



twtejk I llitles to handle ssa- 

l massage of eoal «&d ' 
■ oply'iug with Tona of Anharst official 
request to t- : i s assise©® ere- by present 
unloading ©a siding that is inadequate 
for the tonsaga handled. 



Mo Priority Ho, 



7 



! 



: 









approved c 

'...■■'.■ 
... 












' ; \1 \ 



\ 



5 J, 









Total 



i »wa-. l w*w»vs»e*.wT»s>^ -^r-r-vS<>fv*;«aiF*"i 'W»»- 



18,513,000 






. 



. sss<> 



t$ of 



Capital Outlay 






■ 






2:1 o lagl: ' | 

Sfeydy r« ; ■ ■ drntmrm i ©aalbility of 

gfiMMtratlng te 

Atittg. 

iMHimwal- of aiae 

22 * tg - i*) 

New ■ Pi ■ §@4 foi 

I ■ 

provide 'lictsslfig f< 

fit.. ■ ■ ■■ | . 

23, ■ ■ alty ttarahc i 42,01 

atora .-,■■ goi u rials i , vtor^d »toi«kh 



train 

■ r I ■;."■ ■ -..;...■.■.■ ; 

.-.■■,. of 
tha U&ivara-ity. 



,:--\:-«^W'"'^wn^ii»wc»3';;.-: 






mXr 



Cl< 






i£ $ o 



28 






as 
Doraitoi 
ineludJ 113 . ^©y 

2,966 ■ . 

• 21 , 000 

\ 

furnishing i equif 



lition Xnterior 

eluding &s; li Hall, Shade 'Tree Laboratories, 

South College «nd Oth© 

^rojecfc to cover the necessary interior 
reconstruction awi repair of structures 
being vacated b saeatu feeing aoved 
into new struct . It as Science Center 
met required for md esapansion 

of other depar 

university Warehoi 

Astronomy Lai ,ory & Clas®r©« Building, in- 
furnlshin I ^HBttt 

Educational T¥ and Hadio Fa>siiltiea (Plans) 
Construction of building and procurement 
of aqttij itional ' 

and rails s@ en the c«si§ms in- 
cludiag trai is for 

iut work 

velimiua- vg pi . - | jg- g© E 

on of toimsi Srjiesse Lai 
Building „ 






,00 



* ' ■• ■ •■ s 



1,000,000 
486,000 

30 , 000 



a*u JMC-M-suMfKn»nM«»MinHBMi>awiuua;i ue taimtWHUMtt 



fetal 



Ckstl, 'ogi 

Ftfi, 



I of M 
Priori 

Silo,, 



it« 



33 o ! i id Radl. 



&y EH 






. 






34 o III; it it l«s 



)00 



3S S IkuvmitoT.y Bui ; 3 fexr 1,000 3 

furnish Lnclud - Septesbor IS 

doroifccu In oi 2 S 000 

•l:wd«a?;': bj §@g*t«ifeeir 196i 

$(u Miim&l Se.ttas© Building 9 iacte ;3 $&d 

3? 3 Remntetructlofi Povttd ©f©a® s 






2 ,000.000 



.9 •"■"*">> 



300, C 



38 o ■ Additional Blaisg Coonoao (Plan 

Horfeing Plans for disiiag feci I s ia ths nortl ■ 

wmt corner of tho &anpw8 demilt 

to that area« S«4td9d t© feed •tudoats ia 

" (wb©tr 196S wh«i« anroll; .. ■ ; r-sh«» 11,400,, 



OldMT Buj :434lteg 



i@gosidlt icja Interior 
Good® 11 Library m>& 



40 « -i Rfis&areh Fa*s£ii£. . 

boir&tory &ad of£l a i lis the 

vie laity off lEgls©@flag Bui Ida 

ceatr4li£<»d gtadu i'i g® 

eostrse t progrmi 



SO, 000 



-,*?to 5 



^nttW4W».'«Ma<*t«» 












! 






I 






■ 



' 






























' 



'ATTAGMM&Mr® 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Summer School Employment 



The following personnel appointments are recommended for the operation of 
the various summer programs at the University of Massachusetts: 

School of Engineering Faculty 







% of 


Annual 


weeKiy 
Rate to 


Gross 


name 


Title 


Time 


Rate 


be Paid 


Earnings 




June 6 


- 24, 1960 






C«shiu, Kenneth D. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


$8125 


$203.12 


$609.36 


Costa, Armand J. 


Asst. Prof. 


100 


6500 


162.50 


487.50 


Hopkins, Walter 


Asst. Prof. 


100 


6240 


156.00 


468.00 


Kenney, Peter J. 


Instructor 


100 


4667 


116.67 


350.01 


Laestadius, John E. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


7228 


180.70 


542.10 


Patterson, Robert K. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


7826 


195.65 


586.95 


> 


June 27 - 


July 15, 


1960 






Costa, Armand J. 


Asst. Prof. 


100 


6500 


162.50 


487 . 50 


Hopkins, Walter 


Asst. Prof. 


100 


6240 


156.00 


468.00 


Patterson, Robert K. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


7826 


195.65 


586.95 



July 18 - August 5, 1960 



Hendricks on, Karl N. 



Professor 



100 



9328 



245.70 



737.10 



August 1 - 19, 1960 



Costa, Armand J. 


Asst. Prof. 


100 


6500 


162.50 


4C7 . 50 


Herchenreder, Herbert A. 


Instructor 


100 


5967 


149.17 


447.51 


Patterson, Robert K. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


7026 


195.65 


586.95 


Roys, Carl S. 


Professor 


100 


9328 


245.70 


737.10 



August 15 - September 2, 1960 



Cashin, Kenneth D. 
Kenney, Peter J. 



Assoc. Prof, 100 
Instructor 100 



8125 
4667 



203.12 
116.67 



609.36 
350.01 



August 22 - September 9, 1960 



Costa, Armand J. 


Asst. Prof, 


100 


6500 


162.50 


487 . 50 


Herchenreder, Herbert A. 


Instructor 


100 


5967 


149.17 


447.51 


Patterson, Robert K. 


Assoc. Prof. 


100 


7826 


195.65 


586.95 


Roys, Carl S. 


Professor 


100 


9828 


245.70 


737.10 



2. 
SPECIAL EMPLOYMENT (Engineering) 

Feng, Tsuan H. , Associate Professor of Engineering 

Dr. Feng will attend an ASEE-AEC Summer Institute on Nuclear Energy for ! ...; 
Engineering college teachers to be held at Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana, 
June 13 through August 5. The terms of the grant from the Institute state that 
"his institution will be required to grant him an amount at least equal to one 
month's salary (1/9 of his current annual salary) in addition to the salary for the 
academic year.... The Atomic Energy Commission will match this contriuution to a 
maximum of $750.00, and in addition will provide a travel allowance for each 
participant. ;i It is recommended that Dr. Feng be permitted to attend this seminar 
and receive a salary of $369.55 from the University of Massachusetts. This salary 
will be paid from Summer Session. 

Weekly 
% of Annual Rate to Gross 
Name Tit 1 e__ Time R a:e be Paid Earnings 

Sawa, Martin J. Instructor 100 $5967 $114.75 $688.50 

Mr. Sawa of the Van Norman Machine Company, Springfield, Mass. is to assist in 
teaching a machine shop course, from June 6 to July 15. The Van Norman Machine 
Company has agreed to make Mr. Sawa available for the above period of time. His 
salary is to be paid to the company and they in turn will continue Mr. Sawa on their 
payroll for social security purposes and reimburse Lim for extra travel. Mr. Sawa 
taught at the University during the last three summers under similar arrangements. 

OTHER SUMMER EMPLOYMEDT (not including Main Sessions) 

Arunasalam, V. Inst. , Physics 50 4875 60.92 731.04 

Mr. Arunasalam will teach half-time in both summer session terms. He would 
be employed for the period June 20 - September 9. 

Bartlett, Lawrence M. , Professor of Zoology 

Dr. Bartlett has been requested to assist the University in preparing a staff 
study on medical education and its relationship to the University of Massachusetts. 
The report, to be completed by July 15, 1960, will require a considerable amount of 
research. Dr. Bartlett is the University's liaison person with medical schools and 
adviser to our students who take pre-medical studies on campus for eventual entrance 
to schools of medicine. It is recommended that he be employed full-time at a rate 
of $227.50 per week during the period June 6-17, total compensation $455.00. 

Cary, Harold \L , Head, Department of History 

It is recommended that Dr. Cary be employed for nine weeks (June 6 - July 8, 
July 25 - 29, August 1 - 19) to write a History of the University. Dr. Cary will 
study minutes of the Board of Trustees and other relevant materials for the report 
which will be of great value to the University and also be timely for the 
centennial anniversary of the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Cary should receive 
$2,430.18 for the period of employment designated above. This is based on the 
current summer session weekly rate of 2%% of annual salary for a teacher employed 
on a full-time basis. This salary will be paid out of summer session. 



■ :: n J a 



3 
Weekly 

% of Annual Rate to Gross 



% 



Name Title Time Rate _ be Paid Earnings 

Coughlin, John J., Jr. Inst., Art 50 $5,304 $ 66.30 $716.04 

Mr. Coughlin will teach half-time in both summer session terms. He would be 
employed for the period July 5 - September 16. 

Jaeger, Patricia Instructor 50 5525 69.06 32G.72 

Rom. Lang. 
Miss Jaeger will teach half-time in both summer session terms. She would be 
employed for the period June 20 - September 9. 

Johnson, Robert B. Assoc. Prof. 50 8125 101.56 1,213.72 

Rom. Lang . 
Mr. Johnson will teach half -time in both summer session terms. He would be 
employed for the period June 20 - September 9. 

Kauffman, Sidney W. , Head, Department of Physical Education for Men 

The very large increase in summer session enrollment at the University during 
the past two years and an anticipated record enrollment this summer will require the 
services of a full-time person to (1) supervise and coordinate recreational programs 
in the men's and women's physical education facilities and (2) direct and administer 
the summer counseling and proficiency testing programs in physical education. It is 
recommended that Mr. Kauffman be employed in these capacities at a weekly rate of 
$274.62 for the period June 27 - September 2, total $2746.20. 

*Long, Charles R. Instructor 62^ 4667 72.91 074.92 

Botany 
Mr. Long will teach one 3-credit laboratory course in each main summer 
session term. He would be employed for the period June 20 - September 9. 

MacConnell, William Assoc. Prof. 100 7527 1^8.17 1,129.02 

Forestry 
Professor MacConnell will teach Forestry 55, 155 (June 6 - 27) and Forestry 70 
(June 27 - July 15). 

wMarquis, llorwood Professor 100 7644 191.10 2,293.20 

Education 
Mr. Marquis will teach full— time in both summer session terms. He would be 
employed for the period June 20 - September 9. 

*Multer, Dowell, Instructor in Music 

Mr. Multer will teach half-time during the period June 22 - August 2 at a 
weekly rate of $58.33 and total of $349.90. He will also teach full-time during 
the period August 3 - September 13 at a weekly rate of $116.66 and total of $699.96. 
Total gross earnings will come to $1,049.94. 

Williams, Arthur R. Assoc. Prof. 100 7026 195.65 2,152.15 

English 
Mr. Williams is recommended to act as an assistant in the Provost's Office to 
help supervise and direct the summer sessions program. Mr. Williams will also 
teach half-time during the second term of summer session. The period of employment 
would be June 20 through September 2. 

* Non- University Employee 



SUMMER SESSION 



4. 



Name 



First Terra 




---, 




(June 22 - August 2) 














Weekly 






% Of 


Annual 


Rate to 


Gross 


Title 


Time 


Rate 


be Paid 


Earnings 


Hd. ,Dept.Math. 


50 


$109G5 


$137.31 


$ 823. G6 


Assoc. Prof . ,Acct. 


50 


7527 


94.08 


564.48 


Prof. , Zoology 


62.5 


9100 


142.18 


G53.0G 


Instr. , Engineering 


50 


50G3 


63.53 


3ul . 1G 


Prof. , Government 


100 


0736 


213.40 


1310.40 


Assoc. Prof . ,Hcme Ec 


62% 


G125 


126.95 


761.70 


Instr. , Bus. Law 


100 


5746 


143.65 


861.90 


Assoc. Prof . ,Engl. 


100 


7527 


18G. 17 


1129.02 


Assoc. Prof . ,R.L. 


50 


G125 


101.56 


609.36 


Assoc. Prof . ,Home Ec 


50 


G125 


101.56 


609.36 


Instr. , Physics 


75 


5967 


111.87 


671.22 


Assoc. Prof. ,Math. 


100 


G125 


203.12 


1218.72 


Asst.Prof . ,Bact. 


75 


7C20 


131.62 


7G9.72 


Asst.Prof. , Marketing 50 


6240 


7G.00 


468.00 


Assoc. Prof . ,Soc. 


100 


7527 


ICG. 17 


1129.02 


Instr. , English 


50 


5525 


69.06 


414.36 


Asst.Prof. ,Educ. 


100 


6760 


169.00 


1014.00 


Instr. ,Phii. 


100 


5525 


138.12 


820.72 


Instr. , Accounting 


50 


5304 


66.30 


397.80 


Assoc. Prof . , Psych. 


50 


7228 


90.35 


5*2 W 


Instr. , Psych. 


50 


5525 


69.06 


414.36 


Head,Dept.Ec. 


100 


10985 


274.62 


1647.72 


Asst.Prof. , Rom. Lang 


.100 


6760 


169.00 


1014.00 


Assoc. Prof . ,Engl. 


100 


7527 


188.17 


1129.02 


Head,Dept.Soc. 


100 


109S5 


274.62 


1647.72 


Assoc. Prof . ,Engl. 


100 


8125 


203.12 


1218.72 


Asst.Prof. ,Soc. 


100 


5980 


149.50 


897.00 


Instr. , German 


50 


5967 


74.58 


447.48 


Asst.Prof. ,Educ. 


100 


6760 


169.00 


1014.00 


Instr. Art 


50 


5967 


74.58 


447.48 


Asst.Prof. ,Educ. 


100 


6240 


156.00 


936.00 


Instr. Ec. 


100 


5967 


149.17 


895.02 


Assoc. Prof . ,Engl. 


50 


7527 


94.08 


564.48 


Instr. Psych. 


50 


5746 


71.82 


430.92 


Asst.Prof, ,Chem. 


62.5 


6500 


101.56 


609.36 


Assoc. J?rof . ,Educ. 


100 


8125 


203.12 


1218.72 


Asst.Prof. ,Educ. 


100 


7020 


175.50 


1053.00 


Prof. , History 


100 


9828 


245.70 


1474.20 


Asst.Prof. , Speech 


100 


6240 


156.00 


936.00 


Instr. , German 


50 


5967 


74.58 


447.48 


Asst.Prof. ,Chem. 


50 


6240 


78.00 


468.00 


Asst.Prof. , Govern. 


100 


6240 


156.00 


936.00 


Instr. , German 


100 


5304 


132.60 


795.60 


Assoc. Prof . ,M. E. 


62% 


7527 


117.60 


705.60 


Instr. , History 


100 


5304 


132.60 


795.60 


Instr. ,Chem. 


75 


5525 


103.59 


621.54 


Prof. ,Educ. 


100 


7644 


191.10 


1146.60 


Instr. , Psych. 


100 


5525 


13G.12 


828.72 



Andersen, Allen E. 

Anderson, John W. 

Bartlett, Lawrence M. 

Bemben, Stanley 

Beth, Loren P. 

Briggs, Mildred 

Burak, George J. 

Clark, David R. 

Clarke, Katherine A. 

Cook, Gladys M. 

Crooker, Benjamin C. 

Cullen, Helen F. 

Czarnecki, Reynold B. 

Drew-Bear, Robert G. 

Driver, Edwin D. 

Duckert, Audrey R. 

Eddy, Lyle K. 

Ehrlich, Leonard H. 

Elkins, Arthur 

Epstein, Seymour 

Field, Helen 

Gamble, Philip L, 

Greenfield, Sumner M. 

Kaplan, Sidney 

Korson, J. Henry 

Lane, Robert P. 

Lapreato, Joseph 

Lea, Henry A. 
^Lester, Mrs. Eleanor 

Maclver, Ian T. 

McManamy, Mary E. 

Miller, Reuben G. 
Mitchell, John H. 
| Myers , Nancy A. 
jOberlander, George J. 
j Oliver, Charles F. 
j Pippert, Ralph R. 
j Quint, Howard H. 
| Saver e id, S. Jay 
! Stawiecki, Edmund J. 
I Stidham, Howard D. 
I Tinder, Glenn E. 

Trahan, Mrs. Elizabeth 

Weidmann, George P. 

Wickwire, Franklin B. 

Williams, Robert 
*Winetrout, Kenneth 

iMiller, Robert V. 
* Non-University Employee 



First Term (continued) 



5. 



Name 



Wisnieski, Karol S* 
Witham, Francis H. 
Wynne, Alfred M. 
Zane, Edward A. 









Weekly 






% of 


Annual 


Rate to 


Gross 


Title 


Time 


Rate 


bu Paid 


Earnings 


Instr. Bact. 


50 


$5967 


$ 74.58 


$ 447.48 


Teach. Fel. Botany 


62.5 


4667 


72.91 


437.46 


Instr. ,Chem. 


75 


5967 


111.87 


671.22 


Ass t. Prof . , Market. 


50 


6240 


78.00 


468.00 



SIMMER SESSION 



Anthony, Albert S. 

Archer, Robert R. 
*Banks, Arthur 

Boutelle, Harold D. 

Cannon, George W. 
*Cody,C. 
*Curtis, Michael 

Fitzgerald, John M. 

Frink, Orrin 
*Furni8S, Norman 
*Harailton, Stephen 

Hardy, Harold E. 
*Healey, Allan 

Heller, Peter 

Kates, Sol is L. 

Khabbaz, Samir A. 

Koehler, G. Stanley 

Kornegay, William G. 

Lauter, Paul 

Lentilhon, Robert W. 

Ludtke, James B. 

Manfredi, John F. 

Matheson, Alfred H. 
^McCartney, Kenneth 
*Murphy, Orville T. 

O'Donnell, Walter G. 

O'Donnell, William G. 

O'Leary, Helen F. 

Peirce, Henry B. 

Proctor, James S. 
^Robertson, Charles 

Rogers, Vincent R. 
*Rothman, Stanley 
*Scherer, Isidor W. 
*Smith, Phyllis 

Stengle, Thomas R. 

Varley, Henry L. 



Second Term 



(July 27 - September 6) 



Assoc. Prof . ,Educ. 
Ass t. Prof . ,Math. 
Asst . Prof . , Govern. 
Assoc. Prof . ,Math. 
Prof. ,Chem. 
Asst. Prof . , History 
Assoc. Prof . , Govern. 
Instr. , Accounting 
Asst. Prof . , Russian 
Assoc. Prof . ,Hist. 
Instr. ,Art 
Prof. , Marketing 
Asst. Prof . , Govern. 
Prof. , German 
Prof. , Psych. 
Asst. Prof. ,Math. 
Assoc. Prof . ,Engl. 
Asst. Prof . ,Educ. 
Instr. , English 
Asst. Prof. , Account. 
Assoc. Prof . , Finance 
Asst. Prof . ,Soc. 
Asst, Prof. , Physics 
Assoc. Prof . ,Ec. 
Asst. Prof . ,Hist. 
Prof. , Management 
Prof. , English 
Assoc. Prof . ,Educ. 
Asst. Prof . , Speech 
Asst. Prof. ,Chem. 
Asst. Prof . , Govern. 
Asst. Prof. ,Educ. 
Asst, Prof . , Govern. 
Prof. , Psych. 
Asst. Prof. ,Engl. 
Instr. ,Chem. 
Prof. , English 



100 


7826 


100 


7020 


50 


6760 


50 


8125 


75 


9828 


50 


6500 


50 


722G 


50 


5525 


100 


5980 


100 


7826 


50 


5525 


50 


9823 


100 


6760 


50 


9100 


100 


9464 


100 


5460 


100 


8125 


100 


6240 


50 


5967 


50 


6760 


50 


3125 


100 


7020 


75 


7020 


100 


7826 


100 


6500 


100 


3736 


50 


982G 


100 


7223 


50 


7020 


75 


6760 


50 


6760 


100 


7020 


50 


6760 


33 1/3 


9823 


50 


5980 


50 


5746 


100 


932G 



195.65 

175.50 

84.50 

101.56 

184.28 

81.25 

90.35 

69.06 

149.50 

195.65 

69.06 

122.85 

169.00 

113.75 

236.60 

136.50 

203.12 

156.00 

74.58 

04.50 

101.56 

175.50 

131.62 

195.65 

162.50 

218.40 

122.85 

130.70 

87.75 

126.75 

34.50 

175.50 

84.50 

31.90 

74.75 

71.82 

245.70 



1173.90 

1053.00 
507.00 
609.36 

1105.68 
437.50 
542.10 
414.36 
897.00 

1173.90 
414.36 
737.10 

1014.00 
682.50 

1419.60 
819.00 

1213.72 
936.00 
447.43 
507.00 
609.36 

1053.00 
789.72 

1173.90 
975.00 

1310.40 
737.10 

1034.20 
526.50 
760.50 
507.00 

1053.00 
507.00 
491.40 
448.50 
430.92 

1474.20 



* Non- University Employee 



Second Term (continued) 



6. 



Name 



Wilkinson, Thomas 0. 
Wyman, Raymond 
Zajicek, Oliver T. 



Title 



Assoc. Prof . ,Soc. 
Prof. ,Educ. 
Instr. ,Chem. 



% of 
Time 



Weekly 
Annual Rate to Gross 
Rate be Paid Earnings 



100 $7527 

100 9464 

62.5 5746 



$133.17 $1129.02 

236.60 1419.60 

39.78 538.68 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Personnel Actions 
May 24, 1960 



APPOINTMENTS 



CORREIA, Richard J., Instructor in Civil Engineering (Teaching Associate - 
% time) effective September 1, 1960 at $2,333.50 per year. He graduates this 
June and plans to remain here as a candidate for M.S. in C.E. degree. He has 
been accepted by the Graduate School. 

CROOK, Richard A. , Instructor in Electrical Engineering (Teaching Associate - 
1/3 time), effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. He will receive 
a B.S. in E.E. this June from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He will be a 
graduate student next September. 

DOWD, Morgan D. , Instructor in Government, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$4,667 per year. A.B. St. Michael's College, 1955, LL.D, Catholic University 
Law School, 1950. Half-time instructor, University of Maine during past year. 

GORR, Jack Lester, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (Teaching Associate - 
\ time) effective September 1, 1960 at $2,333.50 per year. B.S. in M.E, 
Wofccesfcer Polytechnic Institute, 1953. Served in U.S. Army Signal Corps since 
then but will be discharged in August 1960. He will be a graduate student. 

KORDAHA, Edwin A, , Instructor in Electrical Engineering (Teaching Associate - 
1/3 time), effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. Will receive 
B.S. in E.E. from University of Massachusetts in June 1960. 

LIBERMAN, Arnold M. , Instructor in Electrical Engineering (Teaching Associate - 
1/3 time), effective September 1, 1960 at $777.83 for first semester only. 
B.S. in E.E. Northeastern, 1959. He has been a graduate student at the 
University of Massachusetts since September 1959. 

SMITH, Richard N. , Instructor "A : , Forestry and Wildlife Management (\ time), 
effective July 1, 1960 at $2,730 per year. B.S. University of Maine, 1958. 
Since graduation he has been employed by the Maryland Game and Inland Fish 
Commission. Has been accepted by the Graduate School. 

SMITH, Robert T. , Instructor J 'A", Poultry Science, effective July 1, 1960 at 
$5,460 per year. B.S. University of Maine, 1953, M.S. University of Maine, 
1954. Has had commercial experience and is currently employed as an instructor 
of Poultry at the University of Vermont. 

STEVENS, Frederick N. , Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (Teaching Associate 
1/3 time), effective September 1, 1960 at $1,555.66 per year. Will receive 
B.S. in M.E. from Northeastern University in June 1960. He will be a graduate 
student. 



V** ' 



-2- 

APPOINTMEilTS ABOVE MINIMUM 

BARFIELD, Arthur Dick, Jr. , Assistant Professor of Education, effective 
September X, 1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum) . B.S. William 
and Ilary, 1949, Ed.M. University of Virginia, 1951, expects Ed.D. University 
of Virginia, June 1960. He has had nine years of teaching mathematics and 
science in high schools in Virginia and California and has also taught evening 
courses in a Junior College. 

BLACI3IAN, John L. , Associate Professor of Economics, effective September 1, 
I960 at $7,228 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. Haverford College, M.A. 
Harvard University, 1943, Ph.D. Harvard University, 1957. He was with the 
Christian Science Monitor, 1937-39; Assistant city editor of the Christian 
Science Monitor, 1939-42; Naval Reserve, 1942-46; study at Harvard, 1946-50; 
with Air Intelligence for U.S. Navy, 1950-52; studied at Harvard, 1952-57 and 
Jacob Wirtheira Fellow from 1954-56; Assistant Professor at Bucknell University, 
1957-59; and is presently connected with the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

FRANCHINI, Angelo, Instructor in Romance Languages, effective September 1, 1960 
at $5,033 per year (2 steps above minimum). Graduated in 1943 from the 
"Ginnasio-Liceo Classico" in Bolzano and Trento, Italy, Doctorate in Letters 
from University of Padua in 1943. Taught Latin, Italian and Greek in Italy, 
1940-55; Putney School in Vermont, 1956-59. 

HALL, Donald E. , Assistant Professor of Education, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. Gorham Teachers 
College, 1954, Ed.M. Boston University, 1955. Experience: 4 years elementary 
schools in Maine, 8 years Junior high school mathematics in Maine, Massachu- 
setts and Alaska, 6 years Boston University Junior College mathematics. 

HARRIS, Denton B. , Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, effective 
January 30, 1961 and for second semester only, at $6,760 per year (5 steps 
above minimum). B.S. in C.E, and M.S. in C.E. University of Massachusetts, 
1952 and 1953. Has been with the Dupont Corporation since then. 

KILLAM, Eleanor, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, effective September 1, 
1960 at $5,720 per year (1 step above minimum). B.S. and M.A. University of 
New Hampshire, 1955 and 1956, expects Ph.D. from Yale in I960. Assistant 
instructor, University of Mew Hampshire, 1955-56; research assistant, Yale, 
1950-59; assistant instructor, Yale, 1959-60. 

L0PREAT0, Joseph, Assistant Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, 
1960 at $5,900 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.A. University of 
Connecticut, 1956; M.A. Yale University, 1957; expects Ph.D. from Yale in 
I960. Has held a number of fellowships at Yale including the Currier and 
Wilson fellowships. Although he has had no teaching experience, he has had 
the equivalent of three years of research experience. 

LOVALD, Keith A., Assistant Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.S. University of Wisconsin, 
1951; M.A. and Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 1955 and 1960. Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Jamestown College, 195^-57; Assistant Professor, South Eakota State 
College, 1957-53. 



-3- 

APPOINTHENTS A BOVE MINIMUM (continued) 

RAYMOND, Agnes G. , Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, effective 
September 1, 1960 at $6,760 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.A. Wilson 
College, 1937; M.A. Syracuse University, 1945; D.M.L. Middlebury French School, 
1956. Taught at Syracuse University, 1943-45; Albertus Magnus College, 1947- 
49; Barnard, 1954-55; Wilson, 1955 to the present. 

RISING, Edward J., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1960 at $7,020 per year (maximum). B.M.E. Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, M.M.E. Syracuse, Ph.D. University of Iowa. Instructor, Syracuse, 
1951-54; Assistant Professor, Kansas State College, 1954-56; Instructor, Uni- 
versity of Iowa, 1956 to date while working on Ph.D. which was received in 
1959. 

R0WELL, Robert L. , Instructor in Chemistry, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$5,967 per year (maximum). B.S.Ed. Bridgewater Si:ate Teachers College, 1954; 
M.S. Boston College, 1956; Ph.D. Indiana University, 1960. .Teaching assistant 
at Boston College, 1954-55; Research Fellow at Boston College, 1955-56; 
Teaching Assistant at Indiana University, 1956-57; Research Assistant at 
Indiana University, 1957-60. 

SEABURY, Barbara J., Instructor in Home Economics (1/3 time), effective 
September 1, 1960 at $1,694.33 per year (2 steps above minimum). B.S. Univer- 
sity of Rhode Island, 1949; M.A. Eastern Michigan College, 1956. Kindergarten 
teacher, Cranston, R.I. 1949-51; teacher and director, The Rehabilitation 
Center, Evansville, Indiana 1952-59; teacher, Elisabeth Morrow Morgan Nursery 
School, Smith College, 1959 to date. 

STAIS, James, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, effective September 1, 
1960 at $6,240 per year (3 steps above minimum). B.A. and M.A. University of 
Michigan, 1945 and 1950. He was appointed an Instructor of Spanish at 
Marshall College in 1950 and is now completing his tenth year there. He was 
promoted to Assistant Professor and is re-appointed for next year as 
Associate Professor. 

STANHOPE, Donald F. , Instructor in Accounting, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$5,746 per year (5 steps above minimum). B.A*' Michigan State Univ. ,1958; M.A. 
Univ. of North Dakota, 1960; C.P.A. North Dakota, 1959. Auditor, Minnesota and 
Michigan, 1952-58; Part-time Instructor, Univ. of North Dakota, 1959-60. 

PROMOTIONS 

BURAK, George J., from Instructor in General Business to Assistant Professor 
of General Business, effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

COLLINS, Dan S. , from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor of English, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

DUCKERT, Audrey R. , from Instructor in English to Assistant Professor of 
English, effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

ILARDI, Vincent, from Instructor in History to Assistant Professor of History, 
effective September 1, 1960 at $5,9£0 per year. 



-4- 

PROMOTI OiTS (continued) 

tfRZYSTOFIK, Anthony T. , from Instructor in Accounting to Assistant Professor 
of Accounting, effective September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. 

ZAITZ, Anthony W. , from Assistant Professor of Speech to Associate Professor 
of Speech, effective September 1, 1960 at $7,527 per year. 



REINSTATEMENT 



ABRA1IS0N, Doris E. , Instructor in Speech, effective September 1, 1960 at 
$5,967 per year. She is returning this fall from a year's leave of absence 
without pay. 

B0SC0, James S. , Assistant Professor of Physical Education, effective 
September 1, 1960 at $6,240 per year. He has been on leave of absence for 
past year. 

BRAUI1THAL, Gerard, Assistant Professor of Government, effective September i, 
1960 at $6,240 per year. He has been on leave without pay during the academic 
year 1959-60. 

C0PELAND, Thomas, Professor of English, effective September 1, 1960 at $8,736 
per year. He has been on leave without pay during the academic year 1959-60. 

ILARDI, Vincent, Instructor in History, effective September 1, 1960 at $5,525 
per year. He has been on leave without pay during academic year 1959-60. 

KING, C. Wendell, Professor of Sociology, effective September 1, I960 at 
$9,023 per year. He has been on sabbatical leave during academic year 1959-60. 

LITTLE, Henry, Professor of Chemistry, effective September 1, 1960 at $9,G28 
per year. He is returning from a year's sabbatical leave. 

TUCKER, Robert G. , Instructor in English, effective September 1, 1960 at 

$5,967 per year. He has been on leave without pay during academic year 1959-60. 



REAPPOINTMENT TO FULL-TBiE 

MENTO, Robert K. , from Teaching Associate in Mathematics (1/3 time) to In- 
structor in Mathematics (full-time), effective September 1, 1960 at $4,667 per 
year. 

PART-TUJE APPOIliTtiENT 

WERTHEII4, G., Visiting Professor in Zoology, to be paid from USPHS Grant 
E742C5 for the period July 1 to September 30, 1960 for a total of $950 for 
the three months. 



-5- 



UFGRADING 



COLLINS, William K. , from Instructor in Agricultural Engineering to Instructor 
"A" in Agricultural Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 at $5,930 per 
year (2 steps above minimum) . 



CHAKGE IN GRADE 

ANDERSON, James F. , from Instructor to Instructor :, A' : in Horticulture for the 
period July 1 to August 24, 1960 at $135 per week or a total of $1,053. 

BANFIELD, Walter H. , from Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology to Assistant 
Professor "A" Entomology and Plant Pathology for the period July 1 to August 
1G, 1960 at $156.25 per week or a total of $1,093.75. 

COLLINS, William K. , from Instructor to Instructor l! A i: in Agricultural 
Engineering for the period July 1 to August 24, 1960 at $115 per week or a 
total of $897. 

DUTCHER, Ray M. , from Instructor to Instructor "A" in Bacteriology for the 
period July 1 to August 23, 1960 at $105 per week or a total of $793. 

JOHNSON, Ernest A., from Instructor A'' in Agricultural Engineering to In- 
structor in Agricultural Engineering, effective September 1, 1960 at $5,525 
per year (4 steps above minimum) . 



EXTRA COMPENSATION 

FROST, Irwin, 3/4 time Research Assistant, Atomic Collissons Project NSF- 
G9502 for the period June 5 to September 3, 1960 at the rate of $69.23 per 
week or a total of $900. 

GENTILE, Arthur C, , Assistant Professor of Botany, from June 6 to August 12, 
1960 as Principal Investigator under Public Health Grant, C4052 (Cl) at $123 
per week or a total of $1230. 

JONES, Phillips R. , Assistant Professor of Physics, Atomic Collissons Project 
NSF-G95G2 for the 10-week period June 6 to August 13, I960 at the rate of 
$169 per week as Principal Investigator or a total of $1690. 

MANDEL, Manley, Director on NSF Grant 8710, for the period June 6 to August 
12, 1960 at $156 per week. 

McCULLOUGH, Mrs. Jane, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, for 18 hours of 
work done on conferences held at the University the week of April 18, 1960 
at $1.34 per hour or a total of $24, 1J. 

NUTTING, William B. , Assistant Professor of Zoology, from June 5 to August 4, 
1960 as Principal Investigator under USPHS Grant E-562C6 at 2/9 of $7,020 
or a total of $1,560. 



i 



I 



-6- 

EXTRA COMPENSATION UNDER JE T PROGRAM 

The following members of the faculty of the School of Business Administration 
and the Department of Economics participated in the Junior Executive Program 
held between April 4 and Hay 14, 1960, This program was independent of the 
regular teaching and advising functions and was in addition to the regular 
faculty and administrative functions of the participants here listed. The pro- 
gram for the six weeks included teaching, advising, supervising field trips 
to industries and aiding in the organization of evening seminars. 
The total compensation for each person is: 

Pao L. Cheng $240 

John T. Conlon 240 

Robert G. Drew-Bear 210 

Lawrence C. Hackamack 740 
N ote : In addition to the teaching and advising functions he was also the 
coordinator. This position required his attention from September 1, 
1959 to May 14, 1960. This position as coordinator carried $500 
of the $740 total indicated. 

Harold E. Hardy 240 

James B. Ludtke 240 

Reuben G. Miller 240 

Robert J. Morrissey 240 

Walter G. O'Donnell 240 

Frank A. Singer 240 

Evening Seminar Lecturers : 
Honoraria: 

Rudolph H. Dyler 30 

Sidney Schoeffler 30 

The source of the funds for the JET Program came from the Experiment in Inter- 
national Living, U. S. Headquarters in Putney, Vermont. The funds have been 
deposited with the Conference Board. 



PITTSFIELD G.E. SUMMER GRADUATE PRCGRAM 

SINGER, Frank A., Associate Professor, for the period June 6 through July 21, 
1960, to teach Business Administration 211 at $1,304.31 for the period. 



LEAVE FOR MISS WINIFRED EACTWOO D 

To approve Miss Eastwood* s participation as a member of the exchange team for 
a trip to Russia for the period June 15 to July 5, 1960 at full salary on a 
leave with-pay-basis and retaining all the rights and benefits relating to 
full employment status. 



I